Trove Tuesday – A Highway of Treasures

Recently at the Western District Families Facebook page, the page followers and I completed a virtual tour of the Hamilton Highway “stopping” at historic sites along the way. After 185 kilometres and eight weeks, the virtual tour rolled into Hamilton.  I could not have done it without Trove.  Using Trove as my search engine, I was able to locate relevant out of copyright photos held by the State Library of Victoria and the Museums Victoria Collection.  Also newspaper articles from Trove’s digitised newspapers along the way.

The Hamilton Highway was once the main route to the south-west of Victoria from Geelong and Melbourne and some of the earliest buildings, such as the Elephant Hotel at Darlington, date back to the 1840s.  There was such diversity in the history along the highway.  From Cressy, where local schoolmaster Gabriel Knight documented the growth of the township in the 1910s through to the German settlements between Penshurst and Hamilton dating back to the 1850s.  In between, we visited the beautiful homesteads, learnt about 19th century murders and visited former RAAF bases.  There were volcanoes, bank robberies and many faces from the past.

It was at Hexham that I almost stalled and could have quiet easily got sidetracked.  It had everything I enjoy, homesteads, historic gardens, horses and 1920s/30s glamour.  The Hexham Polo Club began in 1884 and polo really took off in the 1890s.  Families such as the Hoods, Manifolds and Urquharts were there in the beginning and some of their descendants are still members.  The polo drew visitors from Melbourne and the districts around Hexham and was a highlight of the social calendar as were the associated parties and dances.  The following photos are from a tournament in 1936.

"POLO CARNIVAL AT HEXHAM (V.)" The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) 29 February 1936: 27 (METROPOLITAN EDITION). Web. 27 Feb 2017 .

“POLO CARNIVAL AT HEXHAM (V.)” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 29 February 1936: 27 (METROPOLITAN EDITION). Web. 27 Feb 2017 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article141769891&gt;.

 

"POLO CARNIVAL AT HEXHAM (V.)" The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) 29 February 1936: 27 (METROPOLITAN EDITION). Web. 27 Feb 2017 .

“POLO CARNIVAL AT HEXHAM (V.)” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 29 February 1936: 27 (METROPOLITAN EDITION). Web. 27 Feb 2017 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article141769891&gt;.

It wasn’t easy to drag myself away from the polo but I had to keep motoring along but I then came across Boortkoi.  Now Boortkoi was not grandest or the oldest of the homesteads we saw along the Hamilton Highway, but the images of glamour, style and aristocracy it conjured up in my mind made it hard to continue past it.

The State Library of Victoria holds photos of Boortkoi as part of the J.T Collins Collection.  This is one of just many collections the State Library hold and I am constantly grateful to John Collins and his photography for the National Trust he left to the library.  

 J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/231806

BOORTKOI, HEXHAM J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/231806

Boortkoi was owned by the Manifold family and when I did some newspaper searching at Trove, I found this beautiful wedding photo.  On 7 March 1933, Andrew Manifold, son of Edward Manifold of Boortkoi married Jess Robertson of Melton South at Frankston.

"Table Talk of The Week" Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939) 16 March 1933: 4. Web. 27 Feb 2017 .

“Table Talk of The Week” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 16 March 1933: 4. Web. 27 Feb 2017 .

Jess Manifold was beautiful and stylish and I wanted to find out more about her and the life she and Andrew had at Boortkoi. Searching for Jess took me to Table Talk one of my favourite publications digitised at Trove.  I found Jess played tennis in a Camperdown tournament in 1935, a popular social event for the Melbourne socialites.  Table Talk reported on 3 January 1935, Jess had two tennis outfits a pink chukka skirt and a white linen skirt.  Also, at a wedding in January 1937, Jess looked stylish in a cinnamon brown chiffon cocktail dress with a straw toque (brimless) hat adorned with the latest trend, opalescent flowers.  And, at a cocktail party at the Menzies Hotel in 1937, she wore dusty pink with a blue hat, scarf and sash.  I also found Jess was at least twice voted one of Melbourne’s best best-dressed, the only country woman named.

""Grannies" among best-dressed" The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 12 January 1950: 3. Web. 28 Feb 2017 .

“”Grannies” among best-dressed” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 12 January 1950: 3. Web. 28 Feb 2017 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22804008&gt;.

In early 1935, the couple moved into the rebuilt homestead at Boortkoi.  During my Trove searches, I discovered Andrew and Jess had commissioned Edna Walling to design a new garden. The following image is Edna’s plan for the garden.

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/236209

Edna Walling Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/236209

I love Edna Walling.  I’ve read her books, tried to emulate her style in my garden (and failed) and looked through her photos held by the State Library of Victoria, another of the wonderful collections they hold.  With Edna Walling now part of the Boortkoi story, I again started losing my way looking through Edna’s photos again, one of which is among my favourite photos I’ve found at the State Library of Victoria (below).

 Edna Walling Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/280983

Edna Walling Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/280983

The touring has now turned to the Henty Highway from Cherrypool to Portland and has just “arrived” at Branxholme.  There is so much history along the twenty-five kilometre stretch from Hamilton to Branxholme, it’s taken ten days to make the trip.  So why not join us.  You’ll find the Western District Families Facebook page here.

You can find the State Library of Victoria’s collection of photos on the link here and the Museums Victoria Collections on the link here.  Always check the copyright status of the photos and if there are any particular citing instructions.  The SLV has special instructions on their collections such as the J.T.Collins collection and the Museums Victoria also has guidelines for using their photos under the Creative Commons licence.  While I could look for my photos directly on those sites, I find using Trove is much easier for searching, filtering and working with the results and I can easily tag for future reference and keep my newspaper and photo discoveries together.

 

 

Trove Tuesday – Hometown News

It was a chance discovery while searching the fifteen or so years of the Hamilton Spectator available at Trove. There in the search results was an article from 1910. That wasn’t expected when only the WW1 years and the decade 1870-9 were available.  Curious, I tried a search of “Harman” and the result was dozens of articles from the 1880s to 1910. Trove had surprised me adding a further three decades of Specs and I couldn’t have been happier.  Since that day a couple of months ago, I have searched, tagged and found out an incredible amount of new detail about my Hamilton district families.  Also, surnames, street names and locations bring such a sense of familiarity when reading my hometown newspaper, even issues from 100 hundred years before I was a resident.

One of the first items of interest I found was an obituary for my gggg grandfather Joseph Harman from 1893. His son James converted to Methodism around 1851 while still in England.  Joseph, entrenched in the Church of England, didn’t share his son’s enthusiasm for Methodism. However, when the Harmans moved to Byaduk in 1863,  the first church built was Wesleyan Methodist and James Harman, by then a Local Preacher, was one of the forces behind the church.  Joseph had little choice but go along to Methodist services, but as soon as a Presbyterian Church was built at Byaduk eighteen years later, he made that church his Sunday morning destination. There were no family loyalties when it came to Joseph’s faith. It would seem that although the new church wasn’t Church of England, it was more to his liking than the teachings of John Wesley. Granted the Presbyterian Church was less than a mile down the road from his home but the Methodist church was only that distance again further on.

"Items of news." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 30 March 1893: .

“Items of news.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 30 March 1893: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225177127&gt;.

Also found was a rare obituary for a female family member.  Although it doesn’t tell me much about my ggg grandmother Sarah Hughes‘ life, the 400 mourners at her funeral tells me something of the sort of person she was.

"Items of News." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 23 May 1885: .

“Items of News.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 23 May 1885: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225661135&gt;.

 

There are also some great articles about Sarah’s husband James Bishop but I’ll save those for a post just about him because he was a character.

Something I enjoy reading in old newspapers is the seemingly mundane day-to-day goings on in a town. Of course, it’s even better when a story includes a family member.  Like the time in 1899 when my gg grandfather Richard Diwell of Hamilton complained about the night soil man.

"HAMILTON BOROUGH COUNCIL." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 14 October 1899: 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR). .

“HAMILTON BOROUGH COUNCIL.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 14 October 1899: 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR). .

The night soil man Frederick Malster was given the right of reply after the investigation into Richard’s complaint.

"HAMILTON BOROUGH COUNCIL." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 28 October 1899: 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR). .

“HAMILTON BOROUGH COUNCIL.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 28 October 1899: 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR). .

One of the best finds so far were a number of sketches included in a Hamilton Spectator supplement in 1888. The Spec had the sketches of businesses and scenes of Hamilton made by a Ballarat company. Sketches such as these give us a chance to see how things have changed…

 

 

Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 17 April 1888: 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR)..

CORNER OF GRAY & THOMPSON STREETS IN 1888. Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 17 April 1888: 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR).

 

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THE PRESENT VIEW OF THE CORNER OF GRAY & THOMPSON STREETS.

And how other things have barely changed at all…

 

"VIEW OF HAMILTON VICTORIA." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 17 April 1888: 1 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR)..

HAMILTON SPECTATOR IN 1888. “VIEW OF HAMILTON VICTORIA.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 17 April 1888: 1 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR).

 

DSCN0976

THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR AS IS IT TODAY.

 

Trove Tuesday – Early Settlers

A welcome addition to Trove has been the Weekly Times, Victoria’s favourite newspaper for country readers and still in publication.  The editions at Trove cover the years 1869 to 1954 and with a rural focus, I anticipated its arrival. Familiar with the newspaper, I was sure the Western District would be well represented and I wasn’t disappointed.  The photos alone are fantastic.  I’ve found some great Hamilton photos and have shared those to the Facebook group I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria. Some from the 1950s have included faces familiar to many in the group.

There are also family photos and for Trove Tuesday I thought I’d share this lovely photo of Macarthur Pioneers Frederick Button Huggins and Frances Mary Trowell.  Both born in Kent, England in the mid-1830s, they married prior to their arrival at Portland in 1856, settling at Macarthur two years later.  Frances died in 1920 at Macarthur aged eighty-five and Frederick died in 1927 at Macarthur aged ninety-three.

"EARLY SETTLERS AT MACARTHUR" Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954) 6 September 1919: 25. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222567748

“EARLY SETTLERS AT MACARTHUR” Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 – 1954) 6 September 1919: 25. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222567748

During the 1880s, there was a mass exodus of families from the Mount Eccles district near Macarthur.  They included the eldest children of Frederick and Frances Huggins, James, Agnes, and Frances Susan.  With them was Henry Condon, husband of Agnes Huggins and my relatives Walter and Lydia Harman and their children.  Tired of the volcanic stones from nearby Mount Eccles covering their selections making the land unfit for cultivation, they were in search of a fertile place with good rainfall, unlike the often drought prone southwest of the state. That place was Omeo in Victoria’s High Country and they settled there from the mid-1880s.  Henry’s uncle John Condon had lived there since at least 1880 and when his first wife Mary Jane died in 1886, he married Frances Susan Huggins in 1888. 

One of the fifty great-grandchildren of pioneers Frederick and Frances Huggins was the subject of a past Western District Families post.  Witness for the Prosecution from 2011, includes the story of the suspicious death of the wife of the Omeo Methodist Rev. Ronald Griggs.  Lottie Condon, a great-granddaughter of Macarthur’s Frederick and Frances Huggins was unwittingly involved. Lottie’s grandparents James Huggins and Elizabeth Skipworth, both from Macarthur, married in 1881 prior to their move to Omeo.  Their daughter Frances Ethel was born in Macarthur and was only a small child when they moved.  At the age of twenty-one, Frances Ethel Huggins married John Henry Condon, a son of John Condon and his first wife Mary Jane. In 1907, Lottie Elizabeth Condon was born at Omeo to John Henry Condon and Frances Ethel Huggins and twenty-one years later became mixed up in the murder trial of Rev. Ronald Griggs. 

The Harman connection with the families continued with the marriage of Walter and Lydia’s daughter Susannah Harman to William Condon in 1898.  Also, Susannah’s brother Henry was a good friend of Lottie Condon’s parents strengthened by their connection with the Methodist Church at Omeo and in 1928, he too became involved in the murder trial of Rev. Griggs.

To search the Weekly Times, you can follow this link – Weekly Times.  If you would like to read more about Frederick and Frances Huggins’ great-granddaughter Lottie Condon and the murder trial of Ronald Griggs, follow this link – Witness for the Prosecution. 

 

Trove Tuesday – Troveitis

As I write, it is seventeen hours and twenty-one minutes since Trove went offline to prepare for the launch of Trove 7 on Thursday 25 February.  And yes, I’m already missing it.  Not a day goes by when I don’t turn to Trove to find a photo, a parish map, information on events in Australian history or book details.   But I’m reassured knowing in two days this wonderful free resource we are so lucky to have will be back new and improved.

Of course, the online newspapers are my favourite Trove feature especially little gems such as the following article my “Electronic Friend” from Trove sent on Friday.  The article from The Ballarat Star of 18 July 1881 is about my ggg grandfather James Harman.  At age fifty-one in 1881. James and his old horses, pulling a Lennon plough, were a great team, often winning local ploughing matches.  James lived another thirty-five summers but I’m guessing not too many more summers passed after the article before James laid the horses to rest on his Byaduk property Mt Pleasant.

 

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"BREVIA." The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924) 18 Jul 1881 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219331682

“BREVIA.” The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 – 1924) 18 Jul 1881 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219331682

 

**Postscript – Since writing this post I’ve become aware of funding cuts to the National Library of Australia, the home of Trove.  It would be terrible if it meant Trove’s digitisation program was restricted or worse, the introduction of a paywall.  You can read more about the funding cuts here.

Trove Tuesday – Home Saloon

You’ve heard of home brew but what about a home saloon?  For some Hamilton wives with husbands never home until after 6.00pm, it may have seemed an attractive proposition with a good return.  This humorous article, taken from an American newspaper, was published in the Hamilton Spectator 100 years ago today.  It’s another example of the little treasures you find when you dig at Trove.

"SALOON AT HOME." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 12 Jan 1916: .

“SALOON AT HOME.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 12 Jan 1916: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120409423&gt;.

 

Trove Tuesday – Fancy Photos

For my Hamilton’s WW1 research, I’ve read many Hamilton Spectators from the war years online at Trove.  With all the doom and gloom that the war brought to the newspapers of the time, articles like the following make me smile and remind me why I enjoy reading old newspapers.

"FANCY DRESS BALL." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 19 Nov 1915: 4. .

“FANCY DRESS BALL.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 19 Nov 1915: 4. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120405630&gt;.

The title of the Fancy Dress Ball was “The Girls Who Stayed Home” as advertised in the Hamilton Spectator of 22 November 1915.  All proceeds were for the Local Wounded Soldiers Fund.

"Advertising." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 22 Nov 1915: .

“Advertising.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 22 Nov 1915: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120405855&gt;.

 

The article, from the Hamilton Spectator of 19 November 1915,  jogged my memory and I was sure I had seen photos of the event while searching for illustrated newspaper articles about Hamilton at Trove.  Newspapers such as The Australasian, Table Talk and the more recent addition to Trove, Punch, had fantastic photos and they often included country social events.

Punch reported on the Ladies Fancy Dress Ball held in the Hamilton Town Hall on 22 November 1915 with great photos.  I’m always impressed with the detail put into fancy dress costumes 100 years ago and before. Once limited to images from books and newspapers, the rise of film in the 1910s, however, brought new inspiration.  That was evident at the Hamilton Fancy Dress Ball with Charlie Chaplin in attendance.

"HAMILTON LADIES' FANCY DRESS BALL." Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: .

“HAMILTON LADIES’ FANCY DRESS BALL.” Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 – 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138703780&gt;.

The portrait style photos are the real treasures and as names were provided, if  lucky, you may find a family member.  This mysterious gypsy at the Hamilton fancy dress was Miss Eva Wright.

"HAMILTON LADIES' FANCY DRESS BALL." Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: .

“HAMILTON LADIES’ FANCY DRESS BALL.” Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 – 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138703780&gt;.

 

 

As predicted, a number of the ladies went dressed as gentleman.  The following photos show three of those ladies.  Organisers were particularly vigilant on the night to make sure no cheeky men, pretending to be ladies dressed as men, did not pass through the doors.

 

"HAMILTON LADIES' FANCY DRESS BALL." Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: 24. .

“HAMILTON LADIES’ FANCY DRESS BALL.” Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 – 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: 24. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138703780&gt;.

 

The ladies above were from left: Miss Withers – “Tennis Boy”, Miss Eva Strachan “Middy” and Miss L. Meagher “Half-past two in the Morning”.  To read the full article with all the photos click here

Next time you are visiting Trove,  try a newspaper search for your family names and/or towns, but limit your search to the illustrated articles.  You may find a photo of your great-great grandmother dressed as a pirate.  Now that would be a treasure.

 

Trove Tuesday – Thomas Hannay’s Photographs

One of my favourite Facebook pages “Glenelg Shire Council Cultural Collection” alerted me to some new treasures at one of my favourite websites, Trove. Those treasures were the Portland photos of Thomas Hannay, taken around 1859 and held by another favourite, the State Library of Victoria.

From the collection, a photo of Claremont, built by Stephen Henty in 1852 and rented to his brother Francis Henty, caught my eye. The house was the subject of a Western District Families post two years ago. Thomas Hannay’s photo is terrific and if the date on the photos of c1859 is correct, Claremont was in its infancy. At the time of the photo, Francis Henty used the house as a summer home when not at his property Merino Downs.

 

CLAREMONT c1859. Photographer Thomas Hanney. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/5 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318575

CLAREMONT c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/5 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318575

 

As I scrolled through the photos, some familiar names appeared.  They were the names of some of the Portland pioneers who have appeared in Passing of the Pioneers posts or other Portland related posts here at Western District Families.

There was Thomas Must’s home Prospect (below). Thomas was a Passing Pioneer in September 2013. The photo I found of Prospect for that post was from the 1960s, but Thomas Hannay’s photo shows Prospect, built in 1855, as a reasonably new home and with the Must family posing in the front yard.

 

"PROSPECT"c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/26 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320200

“PROSPECT”c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/26 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320200

 

There was also a photo of Captain James Fawthrop’s home. James Fawthrop’s grave was part of the Old Portland Cemetery Part 2 post. He was famous as captain of the Portland lifeboat that went to the aid of the steamer the Admella in 1859. The good Captain, his wife Jane Rosevear, and child posed for Thomas Hannay on his trip to Portland.

 

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FAWTHROP RESIDENCE, PORTLAND. c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/16. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/319967

 

George Crouch’s name was familiar to me, as his wife, Marianne Trangmar was one of the pioneer women of Portland featured in the book Portland Pioneer Women’s Book of Remembrance I wrote about in January 2013.  Their family home is below.

 

CROUCH RESIDENCE, PORTLAND c1859. Photographer Thomas Hanney. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/14 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318507

CROUCH RESIDENCE, PORTLAND c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/14 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318507

 

Thomas Hannay, not only photographed George Crouch’s home, he also photographed his business Trangmar & Crouch that he started with James Trangmar.  The business was established after James Trangmar, a December 2012 Passing Pioneer, arrived in Portland in 1844. James Trangmar  removed himself from the business in 1856 but the name continued on. The business moved to new premises in 1857 and it is presumably that building that was photographed by Thomas Hannay.

 

H2013.345/20 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320053

TRANGMAR & CROUCH c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H2013.345/20. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320053

 

Stephen Rowan Robertson, a Passing Pioneer from August 2013, married William Corney in 1846 and the house below is their family home in Portland.

 

Image courtesy of the State Libary of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/9 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318519

CORNEY FAMILY RESIDENCE, PORTLAND, c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Libary of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/9 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318519

 

Robertson’s Iron Store (below) was owned by the Robertson brothers, James, John, and William.  James and William are among Western District Families’ Passing Pioneers .

 

ROBERTSON'S IRON STORE, PORTLAND c1859. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318582

ROBERTSON’S IRON STORE, PORTLAND c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318582

 

But Thomas Hannay’s photos are not limited to Portland. I also found Larra near Camperdown, the home of March 2012 Passing Pioneer, John  Lang Currie.  John Currie purchased Larra Estate in 1844.

 

"LARRA" c1859. Photographer John Lang Currie. Image no. H2013.345/42 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320299

“LARRA” c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image no. H2013.345/42 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320299

 

There are over eighty photographs by Thomas Hannay, from towns including Digby, Sandford, Hotspur, and Woolsthorpe and you can find them on the following link – Thomas Hannay’s Photographs

Back at Trove, I searched for Thomas Hannay and found he was from Maldon, but was Thomas Hannay Sr the photographer or Thomas Hannay Jr? The following articles are their obituaries, with father Hannay, passing away in 1883 and his son in 1897.

 

"MALDON." Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) 7 Dec 1883: 3. Web. 8 Sep 2015 .

“MALDON.” Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918) 7 Dec 1883: 3. Web. 8 Sep 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88523890&gt;.

 

 

"LOCAL NEWS." The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) 24 Sep 1897: 6. Web. 8 Sep 2015 .

“LOCAL NEWS.” The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954) 24 Sep 1897: 6. Web. 8 Sep 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188142819&gt;.