Trove Tuesday – Early Settlers

A welcome addition to Trove has been the Weekly Times, Victoria’s favourite newspaper for country readers and still in publication.  The editions at Trove cover the years 1869 to 1954 and with a rural focus, I anticipated its arrival. Familiar with the newspaper, I was sure the Western District would be well represented and I wasn’t disappointed.  The photos alone are fantastic.  I’ve found some great Hamilton photos and have shared those to the Facebook group I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria. Some from the 1950s have included faces familiar to many in the group.

There are also family photos and for Trove Tuesday I thought I’d share this lovely photo of Macarthur Pioneers Frederick Button Huggins and Frances Mary Trowell.  Both born in Kent, England in the mid-1830s, they married prior to their arrival at Portland in 1856, settling at Macarthur two years later.  Frances died in 1920 at Macarthur aged eighty-five and Frederick died in 1927 at Macarthur aged ninety-three.

"EARLY SETTLERS AT MACARTHUR" Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954) 6 September 1919: 25. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222567748

“EARLY SETTLERS AT MACARTHUR” Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 – 1954) 6 September 1919: 25. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222567748

During the 1880s, there was a mass exodus of families from the Mount Eccles district near Macarthur.  They included the eldest children of Frederick and Frances Huggins, James, Agnes, and Frances Susan.  With them was Henry Condon, husband of Agnes Huggins and my relatives Walter and Lydia Harman and their children.  Tired of the volcanic stones from nearby Mount Eccles covering their selections making the land unfit for cultivation, they were in search of a fertile place with good rainfall, unlike the often drought prone southwest of the state. That place was Omeo in Victoria’s High Country and they settled there from the mid-1880s.  Henry’s uncle John Condon had lived there since at least 1880 and when his first wife Mary Jane died in 1886, he married Frances Susan Huggins in 1888. 

One of the fifty great-grandchildren of pioneers Frederick and Frances Huggins was the subject of a past Western District Families post.  Witness for the Prosecution from 2011, includes the story of the suspicious death of the wife of the Omeo Methodist Rev. Ronald Griggs.  Lottie Condon, a great-granddaughter of Macarthur’s Frederick and Frances Huggins was unwittingly involved. Lottie’s grandparents James Huggins and Elizabeth Skipworth, both from Macarthur, married in 1881 prior to their move to Omeo.  Their daughter Frances Ethel was born in Macarthur and was only a small child when they moved.  At the age of twenty-one, Frances Ethel Huggins married John Henry Condon, a son of John Condon and his first wife Mary Jane. In 1907, Lottie Elizabeth Condon was born at Omeo to John Henry Condon and Frances Ethel Huggins and twenty-one years later became mixed up in the murder trial of Rev. Ronald Griggs. 

The Harman connection with the families continued with the marriage of Walter and Lydia’s daughter Susannah Harman to William Condon in 1898.  Also, Susannah’s brother Henry was a good friend of Lottie Condon’s parents strengthened by their connection with the Methodist Church at Omeo and in 1928, he too became involved in the murder trial of Rev. Griggs.

To search the Weekly Times, you can follow this link – Weekly Times.  If you would like to read more about Frederick and Frances Huggins’ great-granddaughter Lottie Condon and the murder trial of Ronald Griggs, follow this link – Witness for the Prosecution. 

 

Trove Tuesday – Troveitis

As I write, it is seventeen hours and twenty-one minutes since Trove went offline to prepare for the launch of Trove 7 on Thursday 25 February.  And yes, I’m already missing it.  Not a day goes by when I don’t turn to Trove to find a photo, a parish map, information on events in Australian history or book details.   But I’m reassured knowing in two days this wonderful free resource we are so lucky to have will be back new and improved.

Of course, the online newspapers are my favourite Trove feature especially little gems such as the following article my “Electronic Friend” from Trove sent on Friday.  The article from The Ballarat Star of 18 July 1881 is about my ggg grandfather James Harman.  At age fifty-one in 1881. James and his old horses, pulling a Lennon plough, were a great team, often winning local ploughing matches.  James lived another thirty-five summers but I’m guessing not too many more summers passed after the article before James laid the horses to rest on his Byaduk property Mt Pleasant.

 

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"BREVIA." The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924) 18 Jul 1881 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219331682

“BREVIA.” The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 – 1924) 18 Jul 1881 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219331682

 

**Postscript – Since writing this post I’ve become aware of funding cuts to the National Library of Australia, the home of Trove.  It would be terrible if it meant Trove’s digitisation program was restricted or worse, the introduction of a paywall.  You can read more about the funding cuts here.

Trove Tuesday – Home Saloon

You’ve heard of home brew but what about a home saloon?  For some Hamilton wives with husbands never home until after 6.00pm, it may have seemed an attractive proposition with a good return.  This humorous article, taken from an American newspaper, was published in the Hamilton Spectator 100 years ago today.  It’s another example of the little treasures you find when you dig at Trove.

"SALOON AT HOME." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 12 Jan 1916: .

“SALOON AT HOME.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 12 Jan 1916: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120409423&gt;.

 

Trove Tuesday – Fancy Photos

For my Hamilton’s WW1 research, I’ve read many Hamilton Spectators from the war years online at Trove.  With all the doom and gloom that the war brought to the newspapers of the time, articles like the following make me smile and remind me why I enjoy reading old newspapers.

"FANCY DRESS BALL." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 19 Nov 1915: 4. .

“FANCY DRESS BALL.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 19 Nov 1915: 4. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120405630&gt;.

The title of the Fancy Dress Ball was “The Girls Who Stayed Home” as advertised in the Hamilton Spectator of 22 November 1915.  All proceeds were for the Local Wounded Soldiers Fund.

"Advertising." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 22 Nov 1915: .

“Advertising.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 22 Nov 1915: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120405855&gt;.

 

The article, from the Hamilton Spectator of 19 November 1915,  jogged my memory and I was sure I had seen photos of the event while searching for illustrated newspaper articles about Hamilton at Trove.  Newspapers such as The Australasian, Table Talk and the more recent addition to Trove, Punch, had fantastic photos and they often included country social events.

Punch reported on the Ladies Fancy Dress Ball held in the Hamilton Town Hall on 22 November 1915 with great photos.  I’m always impressed with the detail put into fancy dress costumes 100 years ago and before. Once limited to images from books and newspapers, the rise of film in the 1910s, however, brought new inspiration.  That was evident at the Hamilton Fancy Dress Ball with Charlie Chaplin in attendance.

"HAMILTON LADIES' FANCY DRESS BALL." Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: .

“HAMILTON LADIES’ FANCY DRESS BALL.” Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 – 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138703780&gt;.

The portrait style photos are the real treasures and as names were provided, if  lucky, you may find a family member.  This mysterious gypsy at the Hamilton fancy dress was Miss Eva Wright.

"HAMILTON LADIES' FANCY DRESS BALL." Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: .

“HAMILTON LADIES’ FANCY DRESS BALL.” Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 – 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138703780&gt;.

 

 

As predicted, a number of the ladies went dressed as gentleman.  The following photos show three of those ladies.  Organisers were particularly vigilant on the night to make sure no cheeky men, pretending to be ladies dressed as men, did not pass through the doors.

 

"HAMILTON LADIES' FANCY DRESS BALL." Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: 24. .

“HAMILTON LADIES’ FANCY DRESS BALL.” Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 – 1918; 1925) 23 Dec 1915: 24. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138703780&gt;.

 

The ladies above were from left: Miss Withers – “Tennis Boy”, Miss Eva Strachan “Middy” and Miss L. Meagher “Half-past two in the Morning”.  To read the full article with all the photos click here

Next time you are visiting Trove,  try a newspaper search for your family names and/or towns, but limit your search to the illustrated articles.  You may find a photo of your great-great grandmother dressed as a pirate.  Now that would be a treasure.

 

Trove Tuesday – Thomas Hannay’s Photographs

One of my favourite Facebook pages “Glenelg Shire Council Cultural Collection” alerted me to some new treasures at one of my favourite websites, Trove. Those treasures were the Portland photos of Thomas Hannay, taken around 1859 and held by another favourite, the State Library of Victoria.

From the collection, a photo of Claremont, built by Stephen Henty in 1852 and rented to his brother Francis Henty, caught my eye. The house was the subject of a Western District Families post two years ago. Thomas Hannay’s photo is terrific and if the date on the photos of c1859 is correct, Claremont was in its infancy. At the time of the photo, Francis Henty used the house as a summer home when not at his property Merino Downs.

 

CLAREMONT c1859. Photographer Thomas Hanney. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/5 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318575

CLAREMONT c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/5 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318575

 

As I scrolled through the photos, some familiar names appeared.  They were the names of some of the Portland pioneers who have appeared in Passing of the Pioneers posts or other Portland related posts here at Western District Families.

There was Thomas Must’s home Prospect (below). Thomas was a Passing Pioneer in September 2013. The photo I found of Prospect for that post was from the 1960s, but Thomas Hannay’s photo shows Prospect, built in 1855, as a reasonably new home and with the Must family posing in the front yard.

 

"PROSPECT"c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/26 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320200

“PROSPECT”c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/26 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320200

 

There was also a photo of Captain James Fawthrop’s home. James Fawthrop’s grave was part of the Old Portland Cemetery Part 2 post. He was famous as captain of the Portland lifeboat that went to the aid of the steamer the Admella in 1859. The good Captain, his wife Jane Rosevear, and child posed for Thomas Hannay on his trip to Portland.

 

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FAWTHROP RESIDENCE, PORTLAND. c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/16. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/319967

 

George Crouch’s name was familiar to me, as his wife, Marianne Trangmar was one of the pioneer women of Portland featured in the book Portland Pioneer Women’s Book of Remembrance I wrote about in January 2013.  Their family home is below.

 

CROUCH RESIDENCE, PORTLAND c1859. Photographer Thomas Hanney. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/14 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318507

CROUCH RESIDENCE, PORTLAND c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/14 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318507

 

Thomas Hannay, not only photographed George Crouch’s home, he also photographed his business Trangmar & Crouch that he started with James Trangmar.  The business was established after James Trangmar, a December 2012 Passing Pioneer, arrived in Portland in 1844. James Trangmar  removed himself from the business in 1856 but the name continued on. The business moved to new premises in 1857 and it is presumably that building that was photographed by Thomas Hannay.

 

H2013.345/20 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320053

TRANGMAR & CROUCH c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H2013.345/20. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320053

 

Stephen Rowan Robertson, a Passing Pioneer from August 2013, married William Corney in 1846 and the house below is their family home in Portland.

 

Image courtesy of the State Libary of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/9 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318519

CORNEY FAMILY RESIDENCE, PORTLAND, c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Libary of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/9 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318519

 

Robertson’s Iron Store (below) was owned by the Robertson brothers, James, John, and William.  James and William are among Western District Families’ Passing Pioneers .

 

ROBERTSON'S IRON STORE, PORTLAND c1859. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318582

ROBERTSON’S IRON STORE, PORTLAND c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2013.345/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/318582

 

But Thomas Hannay’s photos are not limited to Portland. I also found Larra near Camperdown, the home of March 2012 Passing Pioneer, John  Lang Currie.  John Currie purchased Larra Estate in 1844.

 

"LARRA" c1859. Photographer John Lang Currie. Image no. H2013.345/42 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320299

“LARRA” c1859. Photographer Thomas Hannay. Image no. H2013.345/42 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/320299

 

There are over eighty photographs by Thomas Hannay, from towns including Digby, Sandford, Hotspur, and Woolsthorpe and you can find them on the following link – Thomas Hannay’s Photographs

Back at Trove, I searched for Thomas Hannay and found he was from Maldon, but was Thomas Hannay Sr the photographer or Thomas Hannay Jr? The following articles are their obituaries, with father Hannay, passing away in 1883 and his son in 1897.

 

"MALDON." Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) 7 Dec 1883: 3. Web. 8 Sep 2015 .

“MALDON.” Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918) 7 Dec 1883: 3. Web. 8 Sep 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88523890&gt;.

 

 

"LOCAL NEWS." The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) 24 Sep 1897: 6. Web. 8 Sep 2015 .

“LOCAL NEWS.” The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954) 24 Sep 1897: 6. Web. 8 Sep 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188142819&gt;.

 

Trove Tuesday – A Venerable Couple

While researching Hamilton soldier Samuel Winifred Trigger recently, I stumbled across this wonderful photo at Trove of Samuel and Eliza Trigger, grandparents of Private Trigger, published in the Weekly Times on 14 April 1917.

"A VENERABLE COUPLE." Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 14 Apr 1917: 10. Web. 15 Aug 2015 .

“A VENERABLE COUPLE.” Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 Apr 1917: 10. Web. 15 Aug 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121151983&gt;.

Further searching at Trove uncovered the obituaries of Eliza and Samuel, published in the Port Fairy Gazette on 18 March 1918 and 15 April 1918 respectively, and with the help of various records, I was able to find out a little more about Eliza and Samuel.

Eliza was the daughter of Charles Whittaker and Catherine Totterdale and was born in Naae, Ireland around 1823.  After the death of Charles Whittaker, a Battle of Waterloo veteran, Eliza’s family moved to Somersetshire, England.  That is where she met Samuel Trigger, formerly of Devonshire.  They married in 1847 at Bridgeport, Somersetshire and their first child Emily was born around 1848 in Somersetshire.  They then moved to Avening, Gloucestershire and another daughter, Christina was born in 1850.  Samuel was working as a miller and the family lived in Ball Street, Avening.  Another child, a son Henry, was born before they departed Plymouth in 1852 for Australia aboard the Eliza.  The family arrived at Portland on 9 April 1853.

Firstly, Samuel and Eliza settled at Mt Taurus north of Warrnambool, and Samuel worked as a sawyer.  They eventually moved to the Macarthur/Warabkook area where they remained for the duration of their lives.  Eliza passed away on 6 March 1918 and Samuel, only weeks later, on 1 April.  They were buried at Macarthur Cemetery.  The last piece of significant news they most likely received was that of the death of their grandson Samuel Winifred Trigger at Mouquet Farm on 16 August 1916.  The family received notification almost a year later, on 11 July 1917.

After I found the photo of Eliza and Samuel, I posted it to the Facebook group “I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria”, knowing a lot of Trigger descendants are members of the group, many I know personally.  Therefore, after reading the obituaries of the couple, I was not surprised to learn that when they passed, Samuel and Eliza left four sons, two daughters, thirty-one grandchildren and thirty-eight great-grandchildren.

SOURCES

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851

FreeBMD. England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915 

FreeBMD. England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index, 1837-1915

National Library of Australia – Trove Digitised Newspapers

Pubic Record Office of Victoria, Index to Assisted British Immigration 1839-1871

 

 

Trove Tuesday – Spec-tacular

Since late last year, myself and many others have followed the progress of the digitisation of the Hamilton Spectator, from the poll conducted by the Australian National Library and Inside History Magazine through to yesterday when we were able to read the first digitised issues of the Hamilton Spectator from 1870-1873. But we had an extra surprise when we discovered that not only was the Hamilton Spectator (1870-1873)  digitised but also the Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser (1860-1870).

From a quick search, I have already found some treasures in the two papers.  For example, an article about the opening of the Byaduk Wesleyan Church at which my ggg grandfather and Methodist local preacher, James Harman was present.  Also an article about an inquest at Cavendish where another two ggg grandfathers Charles Hadden and James Mortimer were jurors. And in another article, a report of the opening of the Presbyterian Church at Casterton, built by yet another ggg grandfather William Diwell and his partner George Northcott.

The most precious pieces of Trove treasure from the two Specs have been the following articles from the Hamilton Spectator about an accident that ultimately claimed the life of William Diwell in 1871.

diwell1

“MERINO.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 22 Mar 1871 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196304000&gt;.

 

William was just forty-six when he died in the days after his accident.  His wife, Margaret Turner, died in 1869 aged forty-five.  Their early departures left a family of eight, the youngest just seven.  It was interesting to read of William’s funeral and learn he was a Forester.

"MERINO." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 29 Mar 1871.

“MERINO.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 29 Mar 1871<http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196304508&gt;.

Thank you National Library of Australia, Inside History Magazine, Hamiltonians past and present and history lovers everywhere who saw the value of having the Hamilton Spectator digitised.

To track the Hamilton Spectator’s path to Trove glory, these are the posts I’ve written along the way.

Vote 1 – Hamilton Spectator

And the winner is…Hamilton Spectator

Make a Pledge for the ‘Spec’