Passing of the Pioneers

Some of my favourite early settler stories come from those who had almost a lifetime of experiences before they reached Victoria.  Some of those I’ve written about here had travelled to such places as the Americas, the Middle East, and Indonesia during the 1840s and 1850s.  One of the subjects this month, Adolphe Destree had similar experiences and had basically travelled around the world before he reached Portland in his early twenties.  Nine others join Adolphe for June and while they hadn’t travelled the world, they still have their own interesting stories to tell.

DESTREE, Adolphe Jean Baptist – Died 11 June 1875 at Hamilton. Adolphe Destree was born at The Hague, Netherlands around 1835. He trained as a watchmaker and spent time working in Europe and London before travelling to North America.  After working in New Orleans and New York he sailed to Melbourne arriving in April 1857 on the Hussar

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1857, May 1). Mount Alexander Mail p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197086715

After some time working in Melbourne and only still in his early twenties, Adolphe made his way to Portland. He set up shop there, working out of the Portland Dispensary in Percy Street.

Advertising (1858, April 2). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1843; 1854 – 1876), p. 3  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64570850

In 1860, Adolphe decided to leave Portland for Hamilton.

Advertising (1860, February 29). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64513647

He set up shop in a slab hut near the corner of Gray and Brown Streets, Hamilton, then known as Keepings Corner after the local tinsmiths operating from that corner.

Advertising (1860, June 2). Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser, p. 1.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194860690

On 1 February 1863, Adolphe married Annie O’Donnell and a son Adolphe Jr was born at Hamilton in 1864, the first of a family of five sons and one daughter. Henrietta born in 1868 sadly died at the age of ten months.

Adolphe moved his business from the slab hut to a more substantial shop in Gray Street closer to the intersection with Thompson Street. On the night of 20 September 1870, a fire broke out in Gray Street destroying seven shops including Adolphes.  Like many of the business owners, the Destree’s lived behind the shop and lost all their possessions.

DISASTROUS FIRE AT HAMILTON. (1870, September 21). Hamilton Spectator p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196305860

Adolphe moved into a shop across the road near the corner of Gray and Thompson while he rebuilt and he moved his family to Kennedy Street.

Advertising (1870, September 21). Hamilton Spectator p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196305853

Adolphe had an active public life.  He was on the committee of the Mechanics Institute from 1861 and the committee of the Hamilton Hospital and Benevolent Asylum from the mid-1860s. He was elected to the council in 1865 and was elected Mayor in 1868. With a young family, Adolphe was interested in the provision of education in the town. He was a shareholder and early director of the Hamilton & Western District College Company Ltd. and the honourary secretary and treasurer of the Hamilton Common School.

On 11 February 1875, Annie gave birth to a son Harold but exactly four months later on 11 June, Adolphe died after a short illness leaving Annie and five young sons. He was only forty. Adolphe was buried at the Hamilton Cemetery (below).

GRAVE OF ADOLPHE DESTREE, HAMILTON (OLD) CEMETERY

Annie initially continued on Adolphe’s business but by September 1875 she had sold to Farroll & Sons Jewellery Importers.

TYTHERLEIGH, Robert – Died 17 June 1889 at Casterton.  Robert Tytherleigh was born in Axminster, Devonshire, England in 1807.  He arrived at Portland in January 1857 aboard the Mary Ann with his wife Susan and two sons, James and George.  The family settled in Portland and Robert began work as a blacksmith and farrier in Percy Street.

Advertising (1860, February 15). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser p. 4  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64513528

In 1881, Robert and Susan went to Casterton to live with his son.  He died in June 1889 aged eighty leaving Susan and five sons. One son and a daughter predeceased him.

In 1907, a son of Robert and Susan, John Tytherleigh must have been doing some family history research when he wrote to the Portland Guardian, hoping to find out the details of the arrival of the Mary Ann in 1857. The Guardian in response reprinted the shipping details from the papers edition of 30 January 1857.

The Emigrant Ship Mary Ann (1907, March 20). Portland Guardian p. 3  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63964872

FALKENBERG, Johann – Died 9 June 1899 at Byaduk.  Johann Falkenberg was born around 1835 in Prussia.  He arrived in Adelaide around 1852 and spent time in South Australia working for his brother before travelling to Victoria. He was just east of Hamilton at Pierrepoint for a couple of years before returning to South Australia. It wasn’t until 1863 when Johann finally settled in Victoria, taking up one of the first selections at Byaduk. In 1868, he married Ann Hallam and they went on to have a large family. Sadly Ann died in 1881 aged thirty-two leaving Johann with seven young children.

On several occasions, Johann wrote letters to the editor of the Hamilton Spectator. In 1874, he wrote of the plight of the selector farmer competing for land against the graziers.

THE HAMILTON LOCAL LAND BOARD. (1874, December 5). Hamilton Spectator p. 4.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226073023

He had ongoing sheep thefts from his properties and in 1884, he wrote of what appeared to be a case of one law for some and not for others.

FOREIGNERS AND ENGLISH LAW. (1884, September 30). Hamilton Spectator p. 4.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225660441

Rabbits were in plague proportions around the Byaduk area during Johann’s time there, living in the stones from the ancient lava flow of Mount Napier.  Johann felt he was the “greatest sufferer” in the rabbit situation.

Items of News. (1892, August 13). Hamilton Spectator p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226167070

Johann died in 1899 aged sixty-four and was buried at the Byaduk Cemetery.  He left four sons and three daughters, the youngest of whom was nineteen.

GRAVE OF JOHANN FALKENBERG, BYADUK CEMETERY

KERR, Elizabeth Adams – Died 1 June 1913 at Hamilton. Elizabeth Kerr was born in Glasgow, Scotland around 1833.  She arrived in Sydney with her parents in November 1841 aboard the Trinidad.  Her father Thomas Kerr was a police constable in Sydney but he took up a job of customs officer at Portland which saw the family’s move to Victoria.  In 1850, Elizabeth married Walter Herd and they moved to the Coleraine district. They raised a family of five daughters but Walter died in December 1876 and was buried at the Coleraine Cemetery. In 1878, Elizabeth married  Thomas Penhall in 1878 and she continued living at Coleraine.  Thomas died in November 1912 so Elizabeth moved to Hamilton to live with her cousin Albert Kerr of Lonsdale Street. She died there on 1 June 1913 leaving five daughters.

BROKENSHIRE, John – Died 4 June 1914 at Hamilton. John Brokenshire was born about 1849 in Cornwall, England, and arrived in Australia around the mid-1860s.  In 1872, he selected seventy-seven acres of land in the Victoria Valley which he sold in March 1877.  He had married Emma Cooper in 1876 and the couple moved to Hamilton where John worked as a labourer. Their first child, a daughter Emily, was born that year.

The Brokenshire family saw much tragedy. John and Emma had nine children in total. Three children were born between 1876 and 1880 but by the end of 1880, they had all died.  Baby John died in February 1879. Then came a diphtheria epidemic in 1880.  Emma and her daughter Emily were admitted to the Hamilton Hospital in late April displaying symptoms of the disease. Emily died and was buried on 2 May.  Young Henry also fell ill and died on 19 May from erysipelas, a complication of his diphtheria diagnosis. In a matter of fifteen months, their three babies were gone.  Four more children were born during the 1880s, but three-year-old Thomas died in January 1888.  Two children were born in the 1890s, Elizabeth in 1892 and Joseph in 1895.

On 21 April 1914, another of the Brokenshire children would meet an untimely end. Twenty-six-year-old James was killed while helping convert the former Wesleyan Methodist Church in McIntyre Street, Hamilton into a private home.  The scaffolding James was standing on collapsed, and he fell onto a pile of bluestone and died soon after. John took the news hard and he died less than two months later. It was thought the shock of losing James advanced his demise.  John was sixty-five and left his widow Emma and two sons and two daughters.  Then on 27 March 1918, more tragedy when one of the remaining sons Joseph was killed in action in France

DAVIS, Hester Jane – Died 4 June 1914 at Mortlake. Hester Davis was born in Somerset, England about 1850 arriving in Victoria when she was around sixteen.  She married Thomas Montgomery on 28 April 1870 at Warrnambool.  They had no children.

Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers, 21 May 1870 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60449106

THOMAS MONTGOMERY – VIEWS IN AND AROUND MORTLAKE. (1902, February 8). Weekly Times p. 11.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221230136

The Montgomery’s lived at Killymard at Mortlake. Thomas was a shire councilor and also served as shire president with Hester accompanying him to many official functions. Hester was a devout Methodist and attended the Mortlake Methodist Church (below). She was involved with the church community in many ways including as a Sunday School teacher.

MORTLAKE METHODIST CHURCH. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/771417

Hester died in 1914 aged sixty-four. She was remembered at a memorial service at the Methodist Church on 21 June 1914.  Memories of Hester, written by congregation members were read. 

IN MEMORIAM SERVICE. (1914, June 24). Mortlake Dispatch p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119790806

In September 1916, a memorial tablet for Hester was unveiled at the Mortlake Methodist Church. Thomas had remarried the year before to the widow of the Reverend H.J. Brownell, the former minister of the Terang and Mortlake Methodist Church who died in October 1898.  Thomas Montgomery died in March 1920.

RIGBY, William – Died 17 June 1914 at Portland. William Rigby was born in Staffordshire around 1850 and arrived in Victoria aboard the Athletae with his parents in 1855.  The family settled in Heywood. When William was older he went to work for the shire council and was the caretaker and librarian of the Heywood Mechanics Institute. In 1872, he married Sarah Ann Lovell.  In May 1898, William’s wife Sarah Ann died aged forty-four. in 1901, William remarried to Caroline Heazlewood Bye. William was a member of the Sons of Temperance and the Methodist Church. In January 1905, William went to Portland to celebrate the jubilee anniversary of his family’s arrival in Victoria.

Portland Guardian, 1 February 1905 p2 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63691228

In March 1913, William resigned from his position as an officer of the Heywood Shire Council.  He had bought a cottage in Portland and was retiring there.  He died only fifteen months later at the age of sixty-five. He left his widow Caroline and his children from his first marriage to Sarah Lovell.

HEALY, Margaret – Died 8 June 1917 at Macarthur. Margaret Healy was born around 1837 in Kilkenny, Ireland. She arrived in Australia around 3 June 1852.  In 1854, she married Joseph Twist and they settled at Macarthur then known as Eumeralla. At the time there were only three tents and a wooden building called Robbies Store.  Margaret lived out her life at Macarthur and was eighty-six at the time of her death.  She left her husband Joseph, two sons, and four daughters. Joseph Twist died in 1919.

AUSTIN, Harriet – Died June 1917 at Hamilton. Harriet Austin was born in Huntingdonshire, England around 1837.  She married Thomas Walker and they had two children before they boarded the Ocean Home for Victoria in 1860.  On arrival, the Walkers headed for Hamilton settling in North Hamilton.  Around 1907, Harriet and Thomas took up residence in Collins Street, Hamilton.  Harriet died in late June 1917 and was buried at the Hamilton Cemetery on 26 June. She left her husband Thomas and five sons and two daughters. Thomas placed a Bereavement Notice in the Hamilton Spectator.

 Hamilton Spectator, 30 June 1917 p. 5 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119852490

MITCHELL, Alfred – Died 15 June 1932 at Sandford. Alfred Mitchell was born at Henty near Merino in 1865. On the death of his father Richard, Alfred inherited part of his land and after buying further land, he was able to establish the property, Trevellas Downs.  In 1888, he married Elizabeth Cox. Alfred was a leader of agriculture in the district and always open to new ideas.  His dairy herd was considered one of the finest in Victoria.  He was also a Justice of the Peace and Glenelg Shire councilor for 22 years from 1908 to 1926 and from 1928 to 1932 and president in 1916/7.  In 1931, Alfred lost his woolshed, skin shed, and grain when a fire went through Trevellas Downs.

THE HOMESTEAD AT TREVELLAS DOWNS, c1900. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumsvictoria.com.au/items/769284

At the time of his death, Alfred left his widow Elizabeth, four sons, and two daughters.  He was buried at the Sandford Cemetery.

Passing of the Pioneers

One of the best things about finishing a Passing of the Pioneers post is adding the new pioneers to the Pioneer Obituary Index.  If they have family already in the index, I link them up. When you look at the index, you will see parents, siblings, spouses, aunties, uncles, and/or cousins listed beside some of the pioneers. It’s to make it easier for you if you come across a relative in the index. There will be some linking to do now I’ve finished this post.  Previous passing pioneers Alice Sandry will “reunite” with her husband, Mary Ann Skilbeck with her brother, and David Hutton will have his son join him.  Don’t forget to click on underlined text throughout the post to read more information about a subject.

WYLIE, James Roxburgh – Died 20 May 1876 at Hamilton. James Wylie was born in Scotland around 1843, a son of Hugh Wylie and Margaret Roxburgh.  He attended the University of Glasgow where he studied medicine. After some time as an assistant physician in Glasgow, he took a position as a staff surgeon with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O), in Alexandria, Egypt. It was during the time of a cholera epidemic in 1865-6.

JAMES AND MARY WYLIE c1872. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/402115

By 1867, James had travelled to Batavia in the Dutch East Indies (now Jakarta, Indonesia) remaining for three years.  In 1868, he married Mary Thompson in Singapore and their first child Charles was born in Batavia in 1870.  The Wylies arrived in Melbourne later that year, 

A listing in the Government Gazette in late 1870, revealed James had been added to the list of legally qualified Medical Officers in Victoria.  James, Mary, and baby Charles then proceeded to Hamilton where James took over the practice of Dr. Jenkins at the Manor House while Jenkins travelled to England.

THE MANOR HOUSE, HAMILTON

Advertising (1871, April 19). Hamilton Spectator , p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196305691

Dr Jenkins returned and needed his home back so James moved his family and practice to a cottage on Gray Street opposite the post office.

Advertising (1871, July 12). Hamilton Spectator p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196306880

His time in Hamilton was short but James left a lasting legacy, Roxburgh House in Thompson Street. Tenders from builders were called for in the latter half of 1873.

Advertising (1873, September 10). Hamilton Spectator, p. 3.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226074995

William Holden and William Dunn won the tender and began work. The Wylie family was able to take up residence in mid-1874.

Advertising (1874, August 22). Hamilton Spectator p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226076370

Roxburgh House still stands today.

ROXBURGH HOUSE

In 1874, James was appointed deputy Coroner of Victoria acting from Hamilton and was appointed as the Public Vaccinator for Victoria. Away from medicine, James was on the committee of Hamilton’s Alexandra Ladies’ College (below).

ALEXANDRA LADIES’ COLLEGE. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/399135

James and Mary went on to have a further three children, girls Margaret, Harriet, and Josephine but In 1875, two-year-old Harriet died. She was buried at the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery.  By the end of 1875, Mary was pregnant again.

Tragedy struck again on 20 May 1876, when James died after a short illness leaving a pregnant Mary and three children.  It was found he died of a heart complaint at just thirty-three. Throughout his time in Hamilton, James was extremely busy with his various roles.  He was also visiting patients in surrounding towns and at Macarthur, he and Dr James had set up a surgery in the months prior to his death.  James was buried at the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery with his daughter Harriet.

HEADSTONE OF JAMES ROXBURGH WYLIE, HAMILTON (OLD) CEMETERY.

On the 1 August 1876, a daughter Millicent Birmingham Wylie was born to Mary at Roxburgh House.  Mary and the children later left Australia for England and Mary remarried. Her son Charles returned to Australia to live around 1924. Charles was am an interesting character. He was a writer under the pen name “Flinders Barr”.  In 1928 he won a competition for the design of a Canberra Coat of Arm still in use today.

CANBERRA COAT OF ARMS. (1929, May 2). The Argus, p. 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4002833

Charles Roxburgh Wylie died at Warrawee, New South Wales on 17 November 1947.

ARNOTT, William – Died 2 May 1900 at Hamilton. William Arnott was born in Fifeshire, Scotland in 1842. With his parents, William arrived at Williamstown in 1850 and they made their way to Fiery Creek station (Streatham) where his father had work. He was then employed at William Skene’s station, Kanonalla on the Wannon River. On the way there, the family passed through Hamilton when it was known as The Grange and most of the settlement at the time was around the Grange Burn near Portland Road.

After five years at Kanonalla, the family moved to Hamilton. By that time William was fourteen and he went to work for blacksmith and wheelwright George Brownlees in Lonsdale Street as an apprentice.  Once qualified, William went into business with John Jones.

Advertising (1865, December 20). Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser, p. 1.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194470707

The partnership was dissolved in late 1874 and William entered into business with William Betts.  They took over the blacksmith business of the retiring John Denholm.

Advertising (1875, January 23). Hamilton Spectator p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226076945

Around the same time, William entered into the retail trade with his brother James, taking over Mrs Fulton’s grocery business in Gray Street.

Advertising (1874, November 11) Hamilton Spectator., p. 1. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226076157

Arnott and Betts then took over the undertaking business of David Arnott. They offered a free coach for those who couldn’t afford it and erected headstones and grave fences. They even had photos of the latest monument designs. 

Advertising (1876, May 31). Hamilton Spectator p. 1. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226039620

In his personal life, William married Alice Sandry in 1869, and they went on to have nine children.  The family lived in a cottage behind the grocers in Gray Street.  In 1879, the couple’s infant son George died and in 1886, the couple lost their young son Norman Dundas. On 9 May 1887, their nine-year-old son Frederick died as a result of a fall from a wagonette near the Wannon. 

William was a Hamilton Borough Councillor from 1881 to 1887.  He was also a member of Hamilton’s Princess Alice Lodge of the Manchester Unity Independent Order of Oddfellows. He continued in his grocery business, eventually trading alone. By the end of the 1880s, he was operating as the Beehive Store, a cash grocer with produce and a steam chaff mill. In 1898, William sold to neighbouring store John Thompson & Co. who extended into his store.

The Portland Guardian,.” Portland Guardian  21 Dec 1898: 2 Edition: EVENING.

After the sale, the Arnotts moved to Cox Street, Hamilton. Less than eighteen months later, William was dead at the age of fifty-eight, leaving Alice, five sons, and one daughter.  He was buried at Hamilton (Old) Cemetery with his three sons and later Alice.

HEADSTONE OF WILLIAM ARNOTT AND FAMILY, HAMILTON (OLD) CEMETERY

HARRIS, George Cornfield – Died May 1904 at Colac. George Harris was born around 1831 in Coventry, England. He arrived in Melbourne in 1852 aged twenty-one.  Two years later he married Elizabeth Columbine and the couple settled in Prahran and started a family. In the early 1860s, George moved his family to Barongarook near Colac, however, Elizabeth died in 1863 leaving George with young children. On 10 June 1865, he remarried to Elizabeth Hilton of Geelong and they went on to have a large family together.

George was instrumental in the construction of a church and Sunday school at Barongarook West.  He was also the Barongarook West correspondent for the Colac Herald.  George’s obituary mentioned his “brightly” written pieces ensured the “wants and requirements of the forest country were brought before the public, and especially under the notice of the Colac Shire Council.”. Given that description, it would seem the following Barongarook update from the Colac Herald in 1894 may have been the work of George Harris.

BARONGAROOK. (1894, July 3). The Colac Herald, p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91882409

At the time of his death, George had eight living children with four predeceasing him.

HUTTON, John Alexander – Died 2 May 1908 at Penshurst.  John Hutton was born in Tasmania around 1840.  When John was six his father David Hutton took up the Cheviot Hills run near Penshurst which he held until his death in 1875. At that time, John and his brother Thomas took up the property. In 1877, John married Christina Aitken of Penshurst and they went on to have two sons.

Fire touched Cheviot Hills a number of times but one deliberately lit during February 1892 caused much damage to the property. John and Thomas lost 2000 acres of grass, fencing, and valuable Merino rams.  John almost lost his life when fire encircled him while rounding up stock. 

EXTENSIVE BUSH FIRES. (1892, February 9). Hamilton Spectator p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226163601

In 1900, Thomas died and the following year Cheviot Hills was subdivided.  John retained a portion including the homestead. 

FAMOUS PASTORAL PROPERTIES: Cheviot Hills Adjoins Penshurst in Rich Volcanic Country (1942, January 3). The Australasian p. 24. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142415846

John was an active member of the Penshurst Presbyterian Church and sat on the Mt Rouse Shire council from 1887 until his death and was Shire President for much of his last ten years. He was also a trustee of the Penshurst Mechanics Institute. In September1905, a gig John was travelling in hit a rock and tipped over and John was thrown out.  He broke his thigh and suffered shock.  He died three years later aged sixty-eight leaving his widow Christina and two sons, Stanley and Oswald. He was buried at Port Fairy Cemetery.

JACKMAN, James – Died 27 May 1916 at Woodford.  James Jackman was born around 1847 near Tower Hill. He married Margaret Barry in 1867 and they went on to have ten sons and three daughters.  James was a champion ploughman, participating in ploughing matches as a participant and judge.  He was a crop and a dairy farmer, and his was considered a model farm.  James was also a director of the Farnham Cheese & Butter Factory.

GILL, James Bruce – Died 8 May 1918 at Sandford.  James Gill was born around 1849 in Aberdeen, Scotland, the son of a watchmaker. He arrived in Queensland in 1867 aged eighteen. After some time there, he travelled south and purchased Runneymede near Sandford in 1880.

‘RUNNYMEDE’ HOMESTEAD NEAR CASTERTON, 1977. Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/217175

James was widely known in racing circles not only as President of the Casterton Racing Club for thirty years but also as an owner at metropolitan courses during the 1880s and 1890s. During his time with the Casterton Racing Club, the course was remodelled to take advantage of the hill on which the grandstand now sits. He also contributed half of the costs of the changes.

CASTERTON RACECOURSE c1905.
Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/399152

The next photo shows a meeting at the Casterton Racecourse in 1914 at a time James was president of the club.

CASTERTON RACECOURSE 1914. Image courtesy of the State LIbrary of Victoria https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/767564

James also enjoyed hunting and was a member of the Melbourne Hunt Club while his paddocks at Runnymede became a retirement haven for retired hunters.  In 1894, artist Herbert Woodhouse completed the work below showing sixty prominent members of the Melbourne Hunt Club. Among them are several Western District ladies and gentlemen including those by the name of Manifold and Chirnside.  James was also depicted and I have coloured his jacket below.  You can view the work and the names of those illustrated on the link to the State Library of NSW – A Meeting of the Melbourne Hunt Club

‘A MEETING OF THE MELBOURNE HUNT CLUB’. Image courtesy of the Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales https://search.sl.nsw.gov.au/permalink/f/1cvjue2/ADLIB110332134

On 15 July 1885, James married Ruth Pennycuick at the Christ Church, Warrnambool. Ruth was the daughter of the Mayor of Warrnambool James Pennycuick and a granddaughter of William Rutledge late of Port Fairy and Farnham Park, Dennington.  The couple did not have children.

James was a familiar sight around the district driving his black ponies, four in hand, and would often drive them as far as Warrnambool for the races. His obituary remembered that “…beneath a brusque. blunt exterior, he carried a warm and sympathetic nature; being distinctly one for whom esteem increased on acquaintance. He was very generous to his employees, and was ready at all times to do a good turn to anyone”.  From a noted family, James’ older brother was Sir David Gill a Scottish astronomer and he was among a group of colonists named in Burkes Colonial Gentry in 1891.  He was buried at the Casterton New Cemetery.

VAGG, Laban – Died 8 May 1920 at Bostock’s Creek.  Laban Vagg was born around 1837 in Somersetshire, England. Laban joined the British Navy and in 1855, was part of naval activities during the Crimean War (1853-1856). In the late 1850s, he joined the rush to Australia and arrived at Geelong.  He found himself at Ewen’s Hill, Cobrico near Camperdown, and met Jonas Jeffers. He went on to do fencing work with Jonas and he also married Jonas’ sister or maybe daughter Elizabeth in 1863.  They went to have eight sons and two daughters. 

About 1890, Laban and his family moved to Bostocks Creek district where he took up dairy farming.  He was a member of the Hampden and Heytesbury Shire Pastoral & Agricultural Society for more than twenty-five years and a director of the Camperdown Cheese and Butter factory.

Elizabeth died in 1891 aged forty-seven.  Her youngest child was just four at the time. Laban died in 1920 aged eighty-three leaving eight sons and two daughters. He was buried at the Camperdown Cemetery.

SKILBECK, Richard – Died 12 May 1924 at Koroit.  Richard Skilbeck was born in 1838 in Compton, England. He arrived in Victoria in 1858 aboard the Salem.  He headed to Yangery Grange near Koroit owned by his uncle John Midgley.  He started work for them on the farm. In 1860, Richard purchased land in High Street, Koroit and built a small cottage. The following year he married his cousin Sarah Midgley.  Their new home was opposite the newly built Methodist Church which was most convenient as Richard was a devout Methodist and had been one of those who assisted with the construction of the church.   He was also a lay preacher and treasurer with the church.  In 1867, a new Methodist church was built (below).

Richard acquired more land around Koroit and began growing tobacco used to treat scab in sheep. It proved to be a successful crop. In 1864, he became a part-owner in the York Mill at Koroit with his brother-in-law William Midgley but they only kept it for two years.

Advertising (1866, October 10). Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser (South Melbourne, Vic. : 1860 – 1870), p. 3. Retrieved May 24, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194471135

In 1866, Richard took over the management of Yangery Grange after the death of John Midgley.  Richard’s successful farming practices saw the property become well known in the district.  In 1889, Yangery Grange was the equal runner up in a Prize Farms competition conducted by the government.  The judges found Richard’s farm was, “certainly one of the very best, neatest and most profitably managed holdings in the Tower Hill district”

GOVERNMENT PRIZE FARMS’ COMPETITION. (1889, September 21). Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 – 1918, 1935), p. 10. Retrieved May 24, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198058642

It’s was said, Richard was the first in the district to use a threshing machine in partnership with Mr Holden of Port Fairy.  He eventually owned three threshing plants that worked full time at harvest time.

 

AN EXAMPLE OF A THRESHING PLANT, 1910. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/771220

Richard was on the committees of the Warrnambool and Koroit Pastoral and Agricultural Societies and served as President of both. He also was an exhibitor, showing his pigs, sheep, and cattle.  About 1890, he bought into the Koroit Butter Factory.  At the time, the factory wasn’t going well so Richard personally guaranteed the bank so the factory could continue to operate.  He was also chairman of the butter factory board for a good part of his thirty years involvement and chairman at the time of his death. He also represented the Koroit factory on the board of directors of the Western District Cooperative Produce and Insurance Company.

As a Methodist, Richard led a life of temperance and was the founding member of the Koroit Independent Order of Rechabites, a temperance organisation. He also collected funds to build a Temperance Hall in Koroit which also incorporated the Koroit Mechanics Institute.  He was also a trustee of the Koroit Botanic Gardens.

KOROIT BOTANIC GARDENS. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/443593

In 1893, Sarah died aged sixty-one.  In 1907, at the age of 70, Richard travelled to his home town in England and married a woman he knew before he left for Australia, Charlotte Dunn (nee Stables).  Charlotte herself had married after Richard left for Australia but was widowed.  Back in Australia, they settled into life at Yangery Grange and remained there until Richard retired when they moved to nearby Hillcrest owned by his son Alfred. Richard died at Hillcrest in 1924 aged eighty-seven, leaving five children. Two sons and one daughter predeceased him. Charlotte died on 5 October 1922 at Hillcrest

Richard’s obituary in the Koroit Sentintal mentioned his

Strength of character, intelligence, thrift, courage and other sterling qualities were possessed by their departed brother. Few men were so widely known throughout the State – certainly none in a Methodist connection – as Richard Skilbeck. He had known him for over 40 years and had on numerous occasions enjoyed his hospitality, and he knew that the inmates of his home were very dear to him. He not only founded a Christian home, but constantly showed his interest in the house of God. It was largely owing to him that the church was founded at Koroit and he had been an officer and administrator from its beginning. He would be sadly missed from the life of the church throughout the State.

In 1967, Harry McCorkall of Koroit edited and published The Diaries of Sarah Midgley and Richard Skilbeck: A Story of Australian settlers 1851-1864 which is a great read. More information about the Midgley and Skilbeck families can also be found at the Midgley family website

McCANN, Margaret Jane – Died 27 May 1947 at Dartmoor. Margaret McCann was born at Sandford in 1864.  As a young woman, Margaret was a good rider and would accompany her brother Peter on kangaroo hunts.  She married Daniel Sullivan in 1885 and they went on to have seven children.  After the birth of her own children, she acted as a midwife in the Dartmoor district. 

Margaret’s son Joseph enlisted in 1916 with the 38th Battalion while Margaret did her bit at home.  She was involved with the Dartmoor Red Cross, the local Comforts Fund, and the Catholic Church committee.  Sadly, Joseph was killed on 15 April 1918 in France. 

Margaret was eighty-four at the time of her death leaving three sons and two daughters.  Three of her siblings were still living, Peter aged eighty-five and Bella at Sandford aged eighty-seven, both of Sandford and Ann at Tallangatta.  Margaret was buried at the Dartmoor Cemetery.

Time Fillers

Social distancing is nothing new. This photo shows my Nana, Linda Gamble (nee Hadden) as a nineteen-year-old isolating at Cherrypool in 1938 with friends and family.  Cherrypool is a location on the Henty Highway between Hamilton and Horsham. All from Hamilton, the group camped out to protect themselves from a polio outbreak in early 1938.  When Nana talked of the photo she always laughed because isolating themselves was basically useless because a number of Hamilton people made the eighty-five-kilometre trip to visit during their time there.

As we’ve seen over the past weeks social distancing has led to novel ways to fill in time. That was no different out at Cherrypool.  The campers came up with the idea of a mock wedding with Nana as the bride.  That’s when this photo was taken.  A mock wedding in the bush is not an option for us at this time but we can learn about our past and Western District Families is a good place to start.

The main section of Western District Families has more than 430 posts.  You can simply start at this post and start scrolling or you can view the posts by category such as Western District History and Cemeteries.  In the right sidebar of this page, you will see the drop-down box for categories. You will also see the Pioneer Obiturary Category and from there you can read the seventy-nine Passing of the Pioneers posts from the most recent.  Or if you are looking for the obituary of a specific person, go to the tabs at the top of the page you will find the Pioneer Obituary Index.  There you can find a person within the alphabetical lists. Click on their name and you will go their Passing of the Pioneers entry.

Another tab at the top of the page is the Western District Links.  There are some useful links for websites if you are interested in researching Western District family history or local history including Facebook groups and pages.  You will also find links to all the Western District newspapers digitised at Trove.

There is also Hamilton’s WW1 with 160 biographies of men and women who served.  Hamilton’s WW1 is divided into Enlistments, Women, and Memorials., Whichever you choose, just click on the underlined names to read a biography.  There are nine new biographies available.  They are:

William Charles Boyd

Thomas Brown

John Leslie Connor

Duncan Brown Cowan

Edmund Dohle

Robert William Drummond

Gertrude Agnes Grewar

Thomas Leslie O’Neil

John James Affleck Younger

A handy tip while reading the posts and pages at Western District Families is to click on any underlined text which will take you to further information on a subject.  It may be a website like, Trove or the Australian Directory of Biography or it may be a related WesternDistrict Families post.

If you’ve made it through all that, you could check out the Western District Families or the Hamilton’s WW1 Facebook pages.  You don’t even have to be a Facebook member to view them either.  On the Western District Families page recently I’ve been posting links to books about Western District history you can read for free online.  Plus there are 1000s of photos you can browse through.  You will find links to both pages in the right-hand sidebar of this page.

If after all that you find yourself twiddling your thumbs again, try the Western District Families YouTube Channel.  You can view nine videos I’ve made including the Western District Families 2018 Album made up of photos shared to the WDF Facebook page.

Or you can view the playlist I’ve put together including sixty-seven history-themed videos from across the Western District such as ‘Mrs Funk and the Dunkeld and District CWA Cookbook’. Aged 100 in 1910, Mrs Funk reads through the cookbook and is reminded of people, recipes, and stories from her past in Dunkeld.  You will find that video and more on the link – WDF YouTube Playlist.

Happy reading and viewing.

Take a Photo – A Moment in Time

The next “Take a Photo” pic was part of the Western District Families Facebook page theme “Along the Hamilton Highway” in 2017 and is a favourite photo of mine.  From the Museums Victoria Collection, the caption reads “A woman, Christina Park (sic), drying apples.” The date was given as c1931, the place depicted as Lake Linlithgow and the creator of the photo, Myrtle Sharrock. 

Christina looks as though she could have been drying apples at Lake Linlithgow near Penshurst all her life, however, I found the photo depicted just a short moment in time in a long life.

CHRISTINA PARKE DRYING APPLES NEAR LAKE LINLITHGOW, CROXTON EAST. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/769626

Christina was born Christina Arbuthnot in 1855 in the Geelong district, the second eldest child of Alexander Arbuthnot and Elizabeth McKenzie (1) ). It appears she grew up in the Blakeville district north of Ballan.  In 1875 aged twenty, she married Frank Parke (2). Frank built a house at Blakeville and they went on to have ten children over the next twenty years with most born around Blakeville.  In 1883, while working as a sawyer for Mr Blake’s mill at Blakeville, Frank badly cut his hand and was taken to Ballarat Hospital.  In 1885, baby Agnes was born at Barry’s Reef near Blackwood but died a month later. (3) (4).   

BARRY’S REEF c1900
Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/401042

After thirty-five years, Christina moved away from the area she had known most of her life when the Parke family went to Warragul. Baby Charles born there in 1891 (5). But it was around the time she turned forty, Christina’s life saw the greatest change when the family moved to the Melbourne suburb of Collingwood.  Rate books from 1896 show they were living at 90 Reilly Street (now Alexandra Parade) in a rented brick home owned by Arthur Taylor (6). Frank’s occupation was given as sawyer however later records show he was working as a bootmaker, possibly at one of the many boot factories in Collinwood and surrounds. The Parke children too worked in the boot trade on finishing school.  Also in 1896, the last of the Parke children Myrtle Alpha was born (7).

Over the next fifteen years, the Parke family moved to various homes in the northern part of Collingwood. It would have been very different for Christina after forty years in the “bush”.

SMITH STREET, COLLINGWOOD. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/279623

In 1904, Christina and Frank’s son Charles died at the Carlton Children’s Hospital aged thirteen (8).  About five years later they moved further north to the suburb of Northcote and that’s where Frank died in 1912 aged sixty-two (9). Not only did Frank die in 1912 but also son George at Collingwood aged thirty-three. (10) And just a year later, another son Ernest died. (11)

Christina moved back to Reilly Street, Collingwood for a short time before spending the next eight years or so living with her youngest daughters Ivy and Myrtle in homes in Northcote, Clifton Hill, and Fitzroy North, while the girls continued working in the boot trade.  When she was sixty-five in July 1920,  Christina’s mother Elizabeth died at Camberwell. By that time, Christina and her younger sister Ellen were the remaining Arbuthnot children from a family of eight.

The following year in 1921, Christina’s twenty-six-year-old daughter Myrtle married William Joseph Sharrock.  William was a son of John  Sharrock and Janet McMillian of Fernleigh near Mount Napier, just south of Hamilton.

Family Notices (1921, May 14). The Age, p. 5.   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article203972411

William worked as manager of Rockewei near Penshurst and Myrtle went to live with him on the property and so did Christina. By the time the 1930s arrived, Christina was seventy-five and she went to live in Cobb Street in Penshurst while William and Myrtle were off at Glenthompson managing another property (11). Next William managed a property at Croxton East, the location of Lake Linthigow and Christina moved in again.  It’s from that time we find out more about Christiana thanks to the Weekly Times. In 1932, Christina participated in the paper’s Free Exchange Service, offering plant cuttings and National Geographic Magazines in exchange for Robour Tea coupons.

OUR WOMEN READERS’ FREE EXCHANGE SERVICE (1932, August 6). Weekly Times p. 25 (SECOND EDITION).   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223813061

Also, Myrtle took a photo of her mother drying apples and sent it to “Miranda” of the “Women’s Bureau” column in the Weekly Times., the same photo held by Museums Victoria. From Myrtle’s letter, we learn about Christina riding horses and giving swimming lessons.

THE WOMAN’S BUREAU (1934, March 17). Weekly Times, p. 21.http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223202919

Christina was soon on the move again. Her next residence was at Buangor where William and Myrtle were also living around 1936. (12) By 1942, William had taken up the family property Ferneigh at Mount Napier and Christina went with them.

MOUNT NAPIER.

By the end of the decade and into her nineties, Christina made her longest journey, moving to Brisbane. She died on 10 July 1950, aged ninety-five while living in an Eventide Home in Brisbane leaving three daughters, Olivia Limpus of Frenchville, Queensland, Myrtle Sharrock of Hamilton, and Elizabeth James of Toorak. 

Family Notices (1950, July 17). Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 – 1954), p. 4.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56950418

What a life!

Sources

  1. Victorian Birth Index, Christina Arbuthnot, 1855, Registration No. 4650/1855
  2. Victorian Marriages Index, Christina Arbuthnot, 1875, Registration No. 3981/1875
  3. Victorian Birth Index, Agnes Park, 1885, Registration No,7689/1885
  4. Victorian Death Index, Agnes Parke, 1885 Registration No. 4146/1885
  5. Victorian Birth Index, Charles Clyde Parke, 1891, Registration No. 18049/1891
  6. Victoria, Australia, Rate Books, 1855-1963
  7. Victorian Birth Index, Myrtle Alpha Parke, 1896, Registration No. 18977/1896
  8. Victorian Death Index, Chas Parke, 1904, Registration No. 11812/1904
  9. Victorian Death Index, Frank Parke, 1912, Registration No. 11531/1912
  10. Victorian Death Index, George Alexander Parke, 1912, Registration No. 5236/1912
  11. Victorian Death Index, Ernest Sydney Parke, 1913, Registration No. 10202/1913
  12. Electoral Rolls, Australian Electoral Commission, Christina Parke, 1931, Penshurst, Wannon, Victoria
  13. Electoral Rolls, Australian Electoral Commission, Christina Parke, 1936, Buangor, Corangamite, Victoria

Wonderful Western District Women Part 6

March is Women’s History Month.  I started Wonderful Western District Women in March 2017 to take the stories of women I have found in my Passing of the Pioneers posts, delve a little deeper and then showcase their stories by way of the Wonderful Western District Women.  This year I have added a dedicated page as an index. You will see the tab at the top of the page or you can follow the link to read nineteen stories of wonderful women. – Wonderful Western District Women Index

The index includes the next two women, May Robertson and Eliza Cooke. May was an active member of the Hamilton community who championed women’s rights. Eliza, a widow with a young family from Cobden, was a pioneer of the transport industry in the Western District. Remember to click on any underlined text to go to further information on a subject.

ROBERTSON, Marslie May  (c1844-1930) also known as May LEWIS

Marlise May Robertson was born in Inverness-shire, Scotland around 1844 and was seven when she arrived in Melbourne with her parents Angus Robertson and Janet McPherson. It was December 1851 and the family would have been glad to reach dry land.  During the voyage, they faced a shortage of drinking water and a run-in with pirates.  The Robertson family stayed in Melbourne only a few days before journeying to Portland on the schooner Mary Agnes.

PORTLAND BAY c1857. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/75143

It was then on to Straun station on the Wannon River near Coleraine where May’s uncles John and William Robertson had already settled.  Life at Straun was not without its dangers. In 1859, May’s brother drowned in the Wannon River after riding his horse into the river in pursuit of a bullock.  The current swept from his saddle and into the water.  He was fourteen. The following year, Angus Robertson purchased Preston Farm about two miles from Hamilton and the family was on the move again.

In March 1868, May married William Sudgen Price Lewis, the stepson of Richard Lewis, a former owner of Rifle Downs at Digby. William was leasing Hilgay near Coleraine at the time and the couple remained there until around 1871 when they moved to Hamilton.  The Lewis family lived at Pine Lodge in Mill Road, Hamilton. May and William had eight children and some time after 1890, they took a young boy Arthur into their care, raising him as their own.

May was an excellent horsewoman. Her older brother John Straun Robertson rode in the Great Western Steeplechase, and if it was thought proper, I think May would have too.  She showed horses including Gold Dust for Samuel Winter Cooke in September 1890 at the Hamilton Show. Lord Hopetoun, Governor of Victoria and a house guest of Cooke at Murndal, was in attendance. It was day two and the ground was slippery.  While competing in the Best Lady Rider Over Hurdles class, Gold Dust fell at the first jump. May quickly remounted and wanted to continue but wasn’t allowed.   

THE HAMILTON PASTORAL AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. (1890, September 19). Portland Guardian, p. 3 (EVENING).  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63629652

Just months after the Hamilton Show, May and William lost their son Alive in February1891 aged six.  In May 1903, another son James died aged twenty-one.

May was very active in the Hamilton community with charitable works with the Salvation Army. She also joined the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), set up not only to promote temperance but also social and political reform.  The WCTU was very active in collecting signatures for the Women’s Suffrage Petition in 1891.  I was not at all surprised to find May signed the petition. 

Another of May’s interests was the  Australian Women’s National League formed in 1904.  A function of the conservative group was to educate women about politics.  The group was very active leading into the 1913 Federal Election and it seems May was in the thick of it.  In order to dismiss rumours of bribery, she wrote to the Hamilton Spectator saying she did what she did in “the cause of Liberalism”.

BRIBERY CHARGE DENIED. (1913, June 21). Hamilton Spectator p. 6.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225032224

May’s son Arthur Lewis was one of the first Hamilton enlistments for WW1, signing up on 1 October 1914 and leaving two months later.  He dutifully wrote home to May and William describing the sights of Egypt, particularly those with a biblical connection.  In a letter, they received in June 1915 written in April, before Arthur left Egypt for Gallipoli.  He wrote to not worry if there was a delay in receiving letters, as he may be going somewhere it would be hard to get letters out.  He closed  “I will say good-bye for just now, and wishing you all the best of luck – case of accidents: give my best love and wishes to everybody.”

On 12 August 1915, Arthur Lewis was shot in the abdomen at Gallipoli.  He was transferred to the hospital ship Guildford Castle, however, he died the following day and was buried at sea. On 25 September 1915, the Hamilton Spectator reported that the Lewis family had received the first news that not only was Arthur wounded over a month before, but he had died from the wounds.  The news came as a great shock to the Lewis family.   On 5 October, within two weeks of hearing of Arthur’s fate, William Lewis passed away. 

May kept busy. She had joined the  Red Cross, making shirts and knitting socks for the boys at the front.  She also entered her fuchsia and dahlia blooms in a Red Cross flower show.  But then May’s oldest son Angus died in Western Australia in March 1916 at the age of forty-four.  The Hamilton Spectator reported the loss was the third for seventy-two-year-old May in eight months. Not surprising she was not her usual “buoyant and energetic” self and was suffering bad health.

But May rallied finding strength from her charitable works and she joined the Friendly Union of Soldier’s Wives and Mothers.  Also, every Sunday she went to the Hamilton Hospital and handed out flowers to the patients.  Her last visit was Sunday 9 June 1930.

HAMILTON HOSPITAL. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

May wasn’t there to hand out flowers the following Sunday.  She had died the day before on Saturday 15 June 1930 at the age of eighty-six.  She was remembered as Hamilton’s best known and much-loved resident and large attendance at her funeral was testimony to that.

COOKE, Elizabeth Jane (c1842-1932) Also known as Eliza MOREHOUSE

Elizabeth Cooke was born in 1842 and arrived in Victoria when she was eight.   After some time, the Cooke family made their way to Ballarat where, in 1866, Eliza married Charles Morehouse.  Children were born to Eliza and Charles in Ballarat before the family moved to Cobden in 1880 where Charles operated a store.  A son was born on 2 August 1881 but just under five months later on 27 December 1881, Charles was dead. Needing to provide for her family, Eliza continued running the store and from around 1882 was operating coach services.

“Classified Advertising” Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954) 12 August 1882: p.3.  <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23343841&gt;.

In doing so, she pioneered coach services between Cobden, Princetown, and Peterborough.  She moved on to mail services as well.  In 1885, she covered the Cobden to Camperdown run

THE CONVEYANCE OF MAILS. (1885, July 14). The Colac Herald, p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352779

She also set to work improving the store.

“Hampden Shire Council.” Camperdown Chronicle  9 November 1883: p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23348063

By 1895, Eliza’s delivery area had expanded.

THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE. (1895, May 6). Geelong Advertiser p. 4.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article149936139

At one stage, Eliza had around forty horses working on her various coach services and each was selected by her.

ROYAL MAIL COACH, VICTORIA c1890s Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/1696441

You could even take a Morehouse coach from Melbourne to Port Campbell for the summer holidays.

“Camperdown Chronicle.”  SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1888.  p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18585307

Eliza also held the lucrative contract to provide bran and oats to the police of Cobden and Camperdown for their mounts. And not only that, she owned the goods shed at the Timboon railway station.  In July 1900, she told the secretary of the Timboon Progress Association (PA) she intended to pull down the shed and remove it to Cobden. Because Timboon couldn’t afford to lose their shed, the Timboon PA organised petitions to send to the Railway Department requesting they buy the shed.  They heard back in August, with the department having offered Eliz £22 for the shed but she refused. She then wrote a letter to the Timboon PA and told them the lowest she would go on the shed was £30.  If she couldn’t get that price, she would remove the building.  I didn’t find an outcome to the situation but I did note that in December 1905 a report in the Camperdown Chronicle mentioned it had been twelve months since the agitation began for a new goods shed at Timboon. 

 Also In 1900, it was reported Eliza’s business was sold to Mr Smith of Colac and John Bryant of Camperdown. However, two weeks later it was reported she was building a new letting stable, corn store and cottage in Curdie Street, Cobden.

COBDEN NEWS (1900, August 30). Camperdown Chronicle p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26109212

Eliza’s daughter Ethel then went on to marry John Byrant in 1902.

Moving with the times, in 1910, Eliza replaced the horse-drawn coach services between Camperdown and Cobden with a motorbus.

A HORSE-DRAWN COACH AND A MOTOR BUS AT AN UNIDENTIFIED LOCATION. Photographer: John Henry Harvey Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/50441

Away from the transport business, Eliza was busy in the community. She was an active member of the Cobden Presbyterian Church (below) and was and the Presbyterian Women’s Missionary Union (PWMU).  During WW1, she was the treasurer of the Cobden branch of the Australian Women’s National League (AWNL).

COBDEN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collection https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/772413

On 5 August 1931, Eliza celebrated her ninetieth birthday at her home Kooringa, Curdie Street Cobden. The celebration including a birthday cake with ninety candles.  At the time Eliza was President of the Cobden Ladies’ Benevolent Society and still chairing meetings.

Eliza died the following year and was buried at the Cobden Cemetery.  A memorial tablet was unveiled in her memory in 1935 at the Cobden Presbyterian Church.

CAMPERDOWN CHRONICLE. PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY, THURSDAY, SATURDAY THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935. (1935, April 11). Camperdown Chronicle, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28750285

Eliza left three sons and two daughters. One of those daughters was Minnie Jane also very community-minded and involved with many of the same organizations as her mother.  Minnie never married and lived with her mother until her death.  Minnie died in 1945 aged seventy-six.

 

Take A Photo – Daystar

The following photo from the Museums Victoria collection was posted to the WDF Facebook page in October 2017 when the photo theme was animals.

Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/771583

The description with the photo reads as follows, “The horse ‘Daybreak’ or ‘Daydream’ (?), a champion hunter who won many equestrian events in the Wimmera and Western district. His certificates and prizes are displayed.”  The individuals identified were named as Ethel McIntyre and John Ross and the photo was taken at Douglas (north-east of Harrow) c1920.

Using those clues, I uncovered a wonderful story of a horse called Daystar and his owner John Hugh Ross. I also found John was part of a family I was familiar with from my Byaduk research.

Born around 1900, Daystar was by the sire Timmon out of the mare Phyllis. In the years 1905 and 1906, John Ross of Douglas (also known as Salt Lakes) was racing Daystar on the flat and over steeples at meetings including Casterton, Chetwynd, Wando Vale, and Hamilton. I couldn’t find him winning a race but he did run second a couple of times.

CHETWYND RACES. (1905, June 6). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved October 19, 2019, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72816584

John also took Daystar on the show circuit, riding the horse in hurdle races and hunter classes and it turned out Daystar was a handy jumper. On 14 July 1909, at Douglas, John was schooling Daystar when the horse cleared a jump of 3ft 6in but it was not the height of the jump, rather the length which stood out.

From take-off to landing, Daystar jumped a width of thirty-nine feet (almost twelve metres). At the time, records dating back to 1847 were cited when another horse jumped thirty-seven feet. The current world record for a long jump by a horse across water is held by a horse called “Something” who jumped twenty-eight feet. (8.4 metres) in 1975.

A WONDERFUL JUMP. (1909, September 7). Glen Innes Examiner, p. 5.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180126153

John Ross was born at Knebsworth south-west of Byaduk in 1875. He left school and started working when he was thirteen.  In the 1890s John joined others from Victoria who travelled to the Western Australian goldfields but he was back in Victoria and living at Douglas by 1905. John was a blacksmith and purchased the Douglas blacksmith shop in 1908,  He was also a good footballer.

The young lady in the photo was named as Effie McIntyre. In 1913, John Ross married Effie Grace McIntyre at the Presbyterian Manse at Hamilton (below).

FORMER HAMILTON PRESBYTERIAN MANCE

The wedding ceremony was followed by afternoon tea at the Caledonian Hotel where Daniel Scullion proposed a toast to the newlyweds on behalf of their parents.  John’s wedding gift to Effie was a gold broach and Effie gave John a gold watch guard.  The couple honeymooned in Warrnambool.

On their return to Douglas, a gathering was held and John and Effie were presented with fifty sovereigns from the locals. It was there Thomas Hobbs spoke of John and Daystar’s contribution to the community.  If someone was requiring medical assistance in the night, they just had to knock on John’s window and ask him to go to Harrow for the doctor. In no time Jack would be aboard “his favourite Daystar” and on his way. John thought he was only doing what he thought was his duty to help others whenever there was a chance.  The rides to Harrow were no trouble because he loved to spend time in the saddle.

John and Daystar continued to compete but in August 1914, Daystar then aged fourteen and with John aboard, dropped dead at the Edenhope P&A show during a round of a hurdle competition.  Daystar cleared the first two hurdles well but ran out at the third jump and dropped from beneath John. A sad and sudden end for Daystar. John must have been devastated not just to lose a horse but his companion. The news of Daystar’s death spread across the country. The story led the “News of the Day” in the Warracknabeal Herald (below).

The Border Chronicle remarked on the coincidence that Daystar carrying number 13 (unlucky for some) had his first and last jumps competition at the Edenhope Show.

As for the Byaduk connection, if you’ve ever travelled through Byaduk, say going from Hamilton to Port Fairy, just past the Byaduk oval you will see the Byaduk Boer War Memorial to the right.  On it is the name of Donald Ross, killed in South Africa on 15 November 1900.

BYADUK BOER WAR MEMORIAL

Across the road is the Byaduk War Memorial.

BYADUK WAR MEMORIAL

With the names of Andrew and Samuel Ross.

BYADUK WAR MEMORIAL

Donald, Andrew, and Samuel Ross were the sons of George Ross and Flora Cameron and younger brothers of John Ross. The boys’ father George died at Byaduk in 1895. Their mother Flora sent off son Donald to South Africa as part of the 1st Australian contingent. Three months after his return in August 1900, Donald was dead from a lung condition. When WW1 came, Flora sent three sons, Andrew, Samuel, and William. At the time of Andrew’s enlistment, the Hamilton Spectator wrote of the “Patriotic Family”

A PATRIOTIC FAMILY. (1916, June 29). Hamilton Spectator p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133702199

On 7 November 1917, Samuel Ross was killed in Palestine while serving with the 11th Australian Light Horse Regiment.  Andrew Ross returned from overseas but died of bronchitis on 10 June 1919.  William returned in 1919 and died at Red Cliffs in 1963.

Meanwhile, John and Effie were running the Douglas Post Office. John had taken over duties temporarily in 1917 when the postmaster at the time enlisted. They also built a new house at Douglas in 1937

John Ross died at Douglas on 29 April 1949 aged seventy-three.  Later in the year, Effie was recognised by the people of Douglas for her service running the Douglas Post Office for over thirty years.  Effie died at Portland in 1976 aged eighty-five. 

Further Reading

Jump of “Daystar” – Gippsland Times – 9 August 1909

Wedding of John Ross and Effie McIntyre – Horsham Times – 21 February 1913

Death of “Daystar” – Terang Express – 25 August 1914

John and Effie’s House Warming – Horsham Times – 23 March 1937 

Obituary of John Ross – Horsham Times – 3 May 1949 

 

WDF News

Some news since my last update.

I was thrilled to be asked along as the guest speaker for the Byaduk/Byaduk North Progress Association Australia Day ceremony. Those of you who have followed my blog for a long time will know of my family connections to Byaduk going back to the early 1860s.  Given the turnout, my ggg grandfather James Harman and his fellow early settlers would have been proud to see the community is still strong in Byaduk. Thank you to the people of Byaduk for having us and for the delicious breakfast. You were all so welcoming and we had a lovely morning.

There have now been four Broken Memories posts. So far you have seen the broken headstones of Samuel and  Frances Hing, Joseph Lissiman, and Thomas Gorman and his three children.  While it wasn’t planned, Parts 2 and 3 have the Hamilton district Diptheria epidemic of 1879/80 interwoven through the stories.  Likewise, Archdeacon Gustaves Innes, of Hamilton’s Anglican Church during that period also makes an appearance in both posts.  There will be more about Gustaves in future posts and the cat I promised in my last update.  The links to the Broken Memories posts so far are –

Broken Memories – An Introduction

Broken Memories – Hamilton (Old Cemetery) Part 1 – Samuel and Frances Hing – The sudden death of Sam Hing’s wife Frances Hing in 1881, was the first in a string of tragedies for Sam and his family.

Broken Memories – Hamilton (Old Cemetery) Part 2 – Joseph Lissiman – A story of a young man who followed his dream only to have his life cut short. And find out how the death of Dunkeld Lay Preacher Joseph Lissiman sparked some ghostly claims in the newspapers.

Broken Memories – Hamilton (Old Cemetery) Part 3 –  Thomas Gorman and his three children, Ethel, Jane and Thomas Jr.  Hamilton stationmaster and former player of the Carlton and Melbourne Football Clubs, Thomas Gorman and three of his children fell to a deadly Diphtheria epidemic in Hamilton and district in 1880.  Read how the Melbourne football community got behind Thomas’ widow and remaining three children and how life turned out for them after their tragic loss.

There will probably be at least three more Broken Memories from the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery. I will then move on to some other cemeteries. I’ve added some new cemeteries to my photo collection over the last month, Byaduk North, Byaduk Lutheran, Branxholme, and South Hamilton Lutheran Cemetery. I’ve also taken my tally of Hamilton (Old) Cemetery photos up to 1500 but I am a long, long way off having a photo of every headstone given my preference for random wanderings rather than an organised approach.

March and April are always busy months  I write most of my Hamilton’s WW1 biographies then and a few years ago I decided to throw Wonderful Western District Women into the mix to coincide with Women’s History Month in March.  There should be at least one WWD Women post during March.  And there is always a birthday post for Western District Families in April.  This year will be birthday post number 9!

For those of you who enjoy Passing of the Pioneers, it’s on hold for the moment.  I would get a lot more PP posts done if new ideas didn’t distract me.  The latest idea is Take a Photo, a new series looking at stories behind photos.

If you follow the Western District Families Facebook page, you’ll know I share a lot of out of copyright photos from the State Library of Victoria and Museums Victoria.  Often it’s possible to find some sort of a story about the subject or event using clues from the catalogue listing.  With the help of Trove digitised newspapers, I’ve found some great stories to include with the photos on the Facebook page and I thought I should share some of those here.  I have one Take A Photo post finished, three close to finished and another four in the early stages,  I’ll post them over the coming months in between everything else.  The first Take A Photo post will be out later today and is the story of a man and his horse.

Broken Memories – Hamilton (Old) Cemetery Part 3

The last edition of Broken Memories touched on the Diptheria epidemic of 1880 in the Hamilton district which claimed the life of Archdeacon Gustaves Innes on 9 April that year. This edition goes back to those times and looks further at the epidemic and those touched by it. The next headstone is located in the Church of England section of the cemetery, only a short distance from the grave of Gustaves Innes 

GORMAN

While organising photos after a visit to the Hamilton cemetery, I came to the headstone above and found I could only make out the name Gorman and the year 1880. However, a search of the Hamilton Spectator quickly revealed the sad story of stationmaster Thomas Gorman and his three children, Ethel, Jane, and Thomas Jr. As recorded on the Gorman headstone “erected by the kindness of his Hamilton friends”, the family were victims of the “same dreadful disease” Diphtheria.

 

Family Notices (1880, May 1). Hamilton Spectator p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225489876

Reading more about Thomas, I discovered something to pique the curiosity of this Carlton Football Club supporter of four decades. Thomas, or Tom as he was known, was a pioneer of the club.

“COME ON THE BLUES!” (1938, June 11). The Australasian p. 21. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article144371844

I also found he was involved in events in the late 1870s now part of Australian folklore. I needed to take a closer look at the life of Thomas Gorman so I went back to the beginning. 

Thomas was born in 1845 at Paramatta, New South Wales a son of British Army soldier Patrick Gorman and Margaret Ryan (1).  A brother William was born in 1848 (2).  By the early 1860s, the Gormans were in Melbourne without father Patrick and living in Hotham (North Melbourne). Thomas began work with Victorian Railways around 1862 to support his family.

The Gorman boys were athletic and played cricket. One of the earliest references to the brothers playing together was from March 1864 in a match between their team Alma Cricket Club (later West Melbourne Cricket Club) against a Young Victorians side. Thomas was nineteen and William aged sixteen.

Richmond (second Eleven) v. Lonsdale. (1864, March 12). Bell’s Life in Victoria and Sporting Chronicle p. 4.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199055492

It was also in 1864, father Patrick Gorman was back in his family’s life and causing trouble for them, enough to force Thomas to have his father charged, stating his job was at risk. Patrick would be no stranger to the City Police Court over the following years. 

The boys continued with their cricket and soon they were also playing the emerging game of Australian Rules Football.  On 28 May 1864, a match was played between Royal Park and Eastern Hill Football Clubs and a Gorman was named for Royal Park. Since no goals were kicked during the game, it was resumed on 11 June 1864.  There were three further matches in which a Gorman played for Royal Park, on 16 July 1864 against Eastern Hill, on 6 August 1864 against Scotch College, and  13 August 1864 against Fitzroy.

On 17 May 1865, a meeting was held at the University Hotel to elect office bearers for the Carlton Football Club. Ben James was elected secretary and his first duty was to write to James Linacre requesting him to take on the role of President.  It was decided to adopt the rules of the Melbourne Football Club.  An intraclub scratch match was played a week later and on 27 May 1865, the Carlton Football Club wearing a uniform of orange including an orange cap with a blue stripe took on Melbourne Grammar  One of the Gorman brothers was on the team.

It was the first year of the Athletics Sports Committee Challenge Cup. There was no draw, rather teams simply challenged the holder of the cup to a match. The winner would then hold the cup. The team to win three consecutive cups was the permanent holder. Throughout the season, Thomas was strong for Carlton in the ruck and often named among Carlton’s best as was William.

FOOTBALL. (1865, July 18). The Herald p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244470269

FOOTBALL. (1865, August 7). The Herald p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244468789

I was able to find six games played by the Gorman brothers in 1865 for Carlton.  In four of those, T.Gorman and W.Gorman were both named, while in the other two games, only “Gorman” was given in the team list. Three of the matches were against the Warehouseman’s Club as well as Melbourne Grammar, Royal Park and Williamstown.   

The Gormans didn’t just play for the Carlton Football Club. Under the rules of the Challenge Cup, players could play for two clubs. On 16 September 1865, Melbourne Football Club was set to play South Yarra for the Challenge Cup in the last game of the season. Bell’s Life in Victoria and Sporting Chronicle described them as the”two crack teams of the colony”  However, Melbourne was without some of its gun players.  Instead, “two good players, Gorman and Toohey, of the Carlton Club, had been impressed for the occasion”.  Melbourne won the game and the 1865 Challenge Cup and it would not be the last time a Gorman played for Melbourne.  

The 1866 season saw a lot of football played by the Gorman brothers both for Carlton and Melbourne, although I have found if Carlton played Melbourne, the brothers played for Carlton.  But no matter who they played for, they always gave their best.  In a match on 14 July, for Melbourne against South Yarra, William was described as “little Gorman the cricketer” giving a standout performance while Thomas, was described as a “heavyweight” in the centre.

THE EARLY DAYS OF AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOTBALL A FOOTBALL – A MATCH AT RICHMOND PADDOCK IN 1866. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/111640

When there wasn’t a Challenge Cup match going with Carlton or Melbourne, the Gormans played in matches such as the Australians vs The World on 7 July 1866. The intraclub match was open only to bona fide members of the Melbourne Football Club.  There was a return match on 4 August but the Gorman brothers played for Carlton that day against South Yarra. On 16 June 1866, William played for Melbourne FC while Thomas played in the opposing team made up of Civil Servants.  It was also in 1866 when one of the Gormans was elected to the Carlton FC committee.       

The brothers played again in 1867, but not with the same frequency as ’66.  Besides, Tom had other things going on in his life.  On 10 August 1867, Thomas then twenty-two, married Alice Ann Travis in West Melbourne (3) and their first child Thomas was born in 1868 (4). Soon after the family moved to Riddells Creek were Thomas was a porter at the railway station. A daughter, Margaret was born there in 1870 (5). Meanwhile, a Gorman was consistently named for Carlton and sometimes Melbourne for the football seasons of 1868, ’69 and ’70.  If an initial was given in the team lists or results, it was “W.Gorman”. Given that, it’s possible William is in the team photo below from 1870.

CARLTON’S FOOTBALL TEAM 54 YEARS AGO (1924, September 23). The Herald, p. 1. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article243887688

Thomas and his family went back to Melbourne around 1871 and he was soon back playing for the Carlton FC.   That year, Carlton played in dark blue uniforms for the first time, having voted to do away with the orange and blue at a meeting on 27 April 1871.  On 3 June 1871, Thomas boarded a train for Geelong with the rest of the Carlton team. They were off to a match against the Geelong team captained by Tom Wills. Tom also played in a match between the Bankers and Civil Servants in August 1871

It appears Tom’s last game of football with the Carlton Football Club was on 7 October 1871 against Melbourne in the final game of the season for the Challenge Cup.  After three hours of play, the Carlton team were the victors and winners of a Challenge Cup for the first time.  During his time with the club over six years, Thomas was named for Carlton at least twenty-two times and made his mark on the game -“Who that has seen him play will never forget Tom Gorman, the Carlton heavyweight; there was no slinging with Tom, but a fair shoulder to shoulder and down the opponent came” (6).

A daughter Edith was born in Melbourne in 1872 (7) but soon the family was off to Longwood, south-west of Euroa and a son Frank was born there in 1874 (8). Thomas was the stationmaster at Longwood and while there he was called to give evidence in December 1875 at an inquest into a fatal accident on the line near the station. Soon after Tom transferred to Euroa as stationmaster and another two children were born there, Jane in 1876 (9) and Ethel in 1878 (10),

By December 1878, the people of Euroa and the wider district were on edge.  The Kelly family from Greta to the north were notorious for their horse thieving and disorderly behaviour. Their rampaging took a more sinister turn in October 1878, when three policemen were shot dead at Stingy Bark Creek, near Mansfield while on the hunt for the Kellys.  The public was warned the gang would stop at nothing.

It was just before 4 pm on Tuesday 10 December 1878 when a man entered the Euroa National Bank and asked the accountant if he could have a cheque cashed. Before the accountant knew it, the muzzle of a gun was pressed to his temple.  It was Ned Kelly and he ordered the accountant to “Bail Up”.  The gang then gathered up around £2,000 of cash, gold, and silver before taking all those in the bank hostage, removing them to the Faithful Creek station about four miles away along the railway line.

RE-APPEARANCE OF THE BUSHRANGERS. (1878, December 12). The Argus, p. 5.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5924398

It was well planned.  The Kellys arrived at Faithful Creek station the day before, taking those there hostage. That evening a hawker arrived at the station and was taken hostage also, and the Kellys fitted themselves out with some new suits for their trip to Euroa. In the morning, Dan Hart was sent ahead to cut the telegraph lines between  Faithful Creek and Euroa. With his job done, Dan had a drink at the Euroa pub and waited for the Kellys to reach town. 

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/244758

The Euroa Railway Station was just across the road from the National Bank, as seen in the view below looking from the station.  The original National Bank is the single-storey building on the right-hand corner. A new bank was later built and is seen on the opposite corner.

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/295293

It was on that fateful afternoon, Thomas Gorman took the short walk from the station to the bank to cash a cheque. It was only minutes after the Kellys arrived.  He knocked on the door but there was no answer and all was quiet inside  He didn’t try the unlocked door but went to the nearby hotel to see if any of the bank staff were in their rooms.  With no success he returned to the bank and knocked again but when there was no reply he left.  What he didn’t know was Dan Hart was guarding the door, ready to shoot anyone who walked through.  Good fortune shone upon Thomas that day. If he had of turned the handle, at the very least he would have been another hostage, or worse, killed.

(1878, December 28). The Kyneton Observer, p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article240931231

Earlier in the day, around 2 pm, Thomas had noticed the telegraph was not working and had an inkling it had been cut but never suspected the Kellys. He had also received word from one of the rail passengers that the line near Faithful Creek station looked like it had blown down. Only an hour before the hold-up, Thomas had organised for the lines to be checked by a passenger on the train to Benalla. 

Word of that surveillance didn’t come through until late into the evening but once Thomas had confirmation the lines were in fact down, he set off in the early hours of the morning with other railway staff to repair it but found it too dark to work, They returned at daylight and the line was successfully repaired but it was a daring operation considering the location of the Kelly gang at that time was unknown.

THE KELLY OUTRAGES. (1878, December 13). The Age p. 3.http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199352746

In July 1879, it was announced the stationmaster at Hamilton Railway Station had received a promotion and was leaving town.  Thomas Gorman was appointed as the new Hamilton stationmaster soon after. The railway at Hamilton had opened only two years prior and when the Gormans reached the town, a new station was under construction. It was completed by October that year.

HAMILTON RAILWAY STATION.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/399071

The Kellys were back in the news by August 1879 after a robbery at the Lancefield Bank. That’s when the people of Hamilton learned of their new stationmaster’s encounter with the Kellys.  The Spectator on 23 August 1879 included the fact in a report about the latest hold-up.  It was a time for visiting past experiences, with Thomas travelling to Melbourne to playing in a charity match for the Hospital for Sick Children with old players from the Carlton and Melbourne Football clubs on 30 August 1879.

On 6 April 1880, Thomas was elected to the General Committee of the Hamilton Football Club with George Rippon as the President. George had served as the first president of the Geelong Football Club from 1859 and was among the club’s leading players until 1865. He continued his involvement with the club, including umpiring Challenge Cup matches until his departure from Geelong for Hamilton in 1876.  And while I haven’t found any occasions where Tom and George faced each other on the field, they were sure to have known each other’s football abilities. Also discussed at the meeting was a match challenge from the Carlton Football Club to the Hamilton club.

“THE HAMILTON FOOTBALL CLUB.” Hamilton Spectator 6 April 1880: p3.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225488377 

The same edition of the Spectator reported Diphtheria, which had been lurking around the district for almost a year, had returned.  Four patients were in hospital and another seven were receiving treatment at home.  All of those who had contracted the disease had been at the Anglican Church Sunday School picnic at the Nigretta Falls on Easter Monday, 29 March.  On 9 April, there were two deaths from the disease, Anglican Archdeacon Gustaves Innes and fourteen-year-old Agnes Cresswell.

Within days, Diptheria had reached the Gorman home.  Little Ethel, just two years old, fell gravely ill and soon four-year-old Jane and father Thomas were also showing symptoms.  On Tuesday 13 April, the three were taken to the Fever Ward at the Hamilton Hospital but Ethel died with hours of her arrival and there were grave fears for Jane.  The following day, twelve-year-old Thomas Jr was also admitted.  By Thursday, Jane Gorman was dead.

At the meeting of the Hamilton Borough Council that week, Mayor William Thomson called for a Royal Commission to investigate how the most recent outbreak occurred since all the children infected to date had been at the picnic at Nigretta Falls and travelled back to Hamilton together. Council voted in favour of such an investigation and also agreed a temporary canvas Fever Ward be constructed at the hospital to accommodate the growing number of patients.  Once the disease was under control, the canvas could be burnt. They also voted to make arrangements for the temporary closure of the Hamilton State School. It was another two weeks before that action was taken.

HAMILTON, c1880. Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia Image no, B 21766/54 collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+21766/54

The powers that be in Melbourne did not think a Royal Commission necessary, but members of the Central Board of Health were sent to Hamilton to conduct an inquiry all the same.  They heard how through 1879 and until their arrival on 17 April 1880, there had been thirty-two recorded deaths from Diphtheria in Hamilton and surrounding towns. All but two were children.

The inquiry saw much finger-pointing as to who at the picnic could have spread the disease and, with new cases still being reported three weeks after the picnic, how did it continue to spread.  The council was accused of allowing waste to build up in street drains. Mr Corbett was made an example of for continuing to deliver goods to the railway station after Diphtheria claimed a son in January and again in the days prior to the inquiry.  Even Thomas Gorman, who at the time lay on his sickbed in the Fever Ward was criticised for continuing his stationmaster duties after Edith fell ill.

Meanwhile, Thomas Gorman Jr was in a “low state” and ten-year-old Margaret Gorman had also been admitted to the Fever Ward.  By Sunday 25 April, Thomas Sr was very ill but it was reported the following Tuesday he was “much improved” but still listed as critical.  Sadly Thomas took another turn for the worse, and he died on Wednesday 28 April.  The Spectator delivered the sad news in their next issue, Thomas Gorman the stationmaster and former Carlton Football Club star was dead.  He was thirty-four.

Items of News. (1880, April 29). Hamilton Spectator, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225490282

At 5.30 am on Friday 30 April, Thomas Gorman Jr also succumbed to Diphtheria.  Just hours later, at 9 am his father was buried in the Church of England section of the Hamilton Cemetery.  The Spectator of 1 May noted that despite the early hour, there were many in attendance including employees from the railway station. They continued,

…no doubt this case is one of the most pitiable that ever occurred in this district…two of his children were struck down by diphtheria. In attending upon them Mr. Gorman caught the disease…every attention was paid to him, but without effect. One by one he saw his children die, and finally, his great courage alone having kept him alive, he followed the two little ones, and another of his children died yesterday.

The Gormans were buried a short distance from others who had died in the weeks before and who had attended the Anglican Sunday School picnic, such as Archdeacon Innes.  While the Gormans were Church of England there is no evidence any of the Gorman children were at the Sunday School picnic, but since all reported cases up to the time of their hospitalisation were said to have been in attendance, there is a strong chance they were.

Some good news came when it was reported Margaret Gorman was discharged from the Fever Ward but the future looked bleak for her mother Alice. She had lost her husband, her eldest boy and two baby girls.  She had no means of income, no savings and three children aged ten, eight and six to support.  Local James Tucker started a subscription fund and approached John Gardiner MLC, the captain of the Carlton FC to assist with fundraising.

It was revealed Thomas was approached by an agent weeks before his death offering life insurance but since funds were tight, he declined. Coincidentally the Spectator report on that revelation ended with “Such is Life” a phrase which in the years since has been associated with Ned Kelly. Folklore or not, that is said to be his final utterance as he faced the gallows a bit over five months after Tom’s death.

Items of News. (1880, May 1). Hamilton Spectator p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225489862

News of Thomas’ passing reached Melbourne with The Australasian of 8 May reporting on the tragic circumstances.     

FOOTBALL GOSSIP. (1880, May 8). The Australasian p. 13. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143022196

By the middle of May, Alice and the children had returned to Melbourne taking up residence in Hotham (North Melbourne).  Alice enrolled the children at the Errol Street State School but was advised their applications would likely be refused for fear of them spreading Diptheria to the other students.

Meanwhile, plans were well underway for a fundraising concert for the Gorman family. It was planned for the Athenaeum Theatre in Collins Street, Melbourne on 27 May under the patronage of the Victorian Football Association, the Carlton and Melbourne Football Clubs and the Metropolitan Rifle Corps.

ATHENAEUM THEATRE, MELBOURNE. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria

A number of singers were booked to entertain the audience and an address by journalist Edmund Finn was planned.

NEWS OF THE DAY. (1880, May 22). The Age, p. 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202140330

The concert was well attended and £25 was raised for the family.  An extract of Edmund Finn’s tribute delivered on the night is below. You can read it in full on the link – The Late Mr Thomas Gorman by Edmund Finn

THE LATE MR. THOMAS GORMAN. (1880, July 3). Hamilton Spectator p. 1 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR). http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225485876

Meanwhile, at Hamilton on 29 May, a cheque for £100 was made out to Alice Gorman.  By August, a total of just over £193 was raised for the family. By then Alice was ill, suffering heart palpitations and money already raised was dwindling due to doctors’ fees.

Items of News. (1880, August 17). Hamilton Spectator, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225488082

Alice recovered and by the end of the year was appointed to take over the station and post office at Joyce’s Creek between Maryborough and Castlemaine.

[?] of News. (1880, December 11). Hamilton Spectator p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225485819

And so continued the Gorman family connection with Victorian Railways.  Alice was later stationmistress at Northcote Station (later known as Merri Station) with daughter Margaret as her assistant (11). Alice died in Clifton Hill in 1938 aged ninety-two (12) 

By 1909, Margaret was thirty-nine and the caretaker of Croxton Station near Thornbury. She then moved on to Glen Iris Station. While there, Margaret had an experience similar to her father’s at Euroa when the ticket box was held up one evening.  It was reported a gun was pointed at her during the robbery in April 1924, but that was later retracted.  Margaret was left shaken by the incident.

GLEN IRIS STATION c1920. Image courtesy of the Public Record Office of Victoria wiki.prov.vic.gov.au/index.php/VPRS_12800_P1_H_5142

Margaret next worked as an inspector with Victorian Railways (13) until her retirement. She never married and died at St Kilda in 1957 at the age of eighty-six. (14)

Frank Gorman also worked with Victorian Railways but moved to New Zealand and worked on the railways there. He was in that country when WW1 broke and he enlisted and served with the New Zealand Army.  On his return to New Zealand, he resumed his work on the railways but died on 18 March 1925. He was working as a guard at Kapuni on the North Island when the train on which he was travelling, hit a cow. Frank died as a result.

The youngest of the surviving Gorman children, Edith, married watchmaker Samuel Haymes in 1897 (15). She lived most of her married life in North Melbourne. Edith died at Sans Souci, New South Wales on 12 December 1951.     

No doubt Alice, Margaret, Frank and Edith thought often of those they left behind in Hamilton in April 1880.  In football circles for years to come when old-timers remembered back to the players in the early days of the Carlton Football Club, the name of Tom Gorman and that of his brother William were among those raised. 

OLD CARLTON. (1909, July 19). The Herald, p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article242063149

Today, Tom’s platform at Hamilton has long been quiet.

THE FORMER HAMILTON RAILWAY STATION

At Tom’s final resting place with his children Thomas Jr, Jane and Ethel, the headstone donated by his friends, lays broken.  Almost 140 years on, there is no-one left to visit and the grave wouldn’t warrant a second glance from passers-by.  Little do they know the significance of those who lay below. Not just the connection to Australia’s homegrown sport and two great clubs of the game but also their part in one of the darkest periods of Hamilton’s history. That alone should never be forgotten.

 

GAMES RECORD OF THOMAS GORMAN

The following games were taken from team lists found in newspapers at Trove.

CARLTON
DATE OPPONENT GORMAN
27 May 1865 Melbourne Grammar School Gorman
10 June 1865 Warehouseman Gorman
15 July 1865 Williamstown Thomas & William
22 July 1865 Warehouseman Thomas & William
5 August 1865 Royal Park Thomas & William
26 August 1865 Warehouseman Thomas & William
5 May 1866 Intraclub Thomas & William
9 June 1866 South Yarra Thomas & William
16 June 1866 Emerald Hill Thomas & William
30 June 1866 Melbourne Thomas & William
21 July 1866 Melbourne Thomas & William
4 August 1866 South Yarra Thomas & William
18 August 1866 Melbourne Thomas & William
1 September 1866 South Yarra Thomas & William
22 June 1867 Melbourne Thomas & William
6  July 1867 South Melbourne Thomas & William
24 August 1867 Melbourne Gorman
27 May 1871 Geelong Thomas
10 June 1871 Melbourne Thomas
24 June 1871 Collingwood Thomas
15 July 1871 Melbourne Thomas
22 July 1871 Albert Park Thomas & William
5 August 1871 Melbourne Thomas*
19 August 1871 South Yarra Thomas
2 September 1871 Melbourne Gorman
7 October 1871 Melbourne Thomas

*William emergency

MELBOURNE
DATE OPPONENT GORMAN
16 September 1865 South Yarra Gorman
16 June 1866 Civil Servants William (Melbourne) Tom (Civil Servants)*
23 June 1866 The Banks Thomas and William**
7 July 1866 The World Thomas and William
14 July 1866 South Yarra Thomas and William
11 August 1866 South Yarra Thomas and William
25 August 1866 South Yarra Thomas and William
15 September 1866 South Yarra Thomas and William

*Thomas and William were down to play two games on 16 June 1866. Both were selected to play for Carlton against Emerald Hill in a Challenge Cup match. Also, William was selected for Melbourne to play in a match against the Civil Service, a team on which Thomas was selected.  Results found for the Melbourne vs Civil Service show the Gormans did play in that match. Results for the Carlton vs Emerald Hill were not found in the newspapers available.

**Intraclub match for Melbourne – Australians v The World

SOURCES

1. NSW Birth Index, Thomas GORMAN, Reg. No. 312/1845 V1845312 62

2. NSW Birth Index, William GORMAN, Reg. No.  349/1848 V1848349 65

3. Victorian Marriage Certificate,  Alice Ann TRAVIS, Reg. No. 3024 / 1867

4. Victorian Birth Index, Thomas GORMAN, Reg. No. 17999 / 1868

5. Victorian Birth Index, Margaret GORMAN, Reg. No. 13969 / 1870

6. Centenary Souvenir of the Carlton Football Club: from 1864-1933 by Colin Martyn 1934 

7. Victorian Birth Index, Edith Agnes GORMAN, Reg. No. 25040 / 1872

8. Victorian Birth Index, Frank GORMAN, Reg. No. 23736 / 1874

9. Victorian Birth Index, Jane GORMAN, Reg. No.  16122 / 1876

10. Victorian Birth Index, Ethel May GORMAN, Reg. No.  15844 / 1878

11. Electoral Rolls, Victoria, Bourke, Subdistrict of Northcote, Alice Ann GORMAN, 1906

12 Victorian Death Index, Alice Ann GORMAN, Reg. No. 8175 / 1938

13. Electoral Rolls, Victoria,   Victoria, Batman, Subdistrict of Northcote, Margaret Alice GORMAN, 1934

14. Victorian Death Index, Margaret GORMAN, Reg. No. 242 / 1957

15. Victorian Marriage Index, Edith GORMAN, Reg No. 6942 / 1897

 

©2020 Merron Riddiford

 

Broken Memories – Hamilton (Old) Cemetery Part 2

Broken Memories takes a look at broken headstones and memorials in Western District cemeteries and the stories behind them beginning with the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery.  Links to previous parts to the series are at the bottom of this post.  Any underlined text throughout the post will take you to further information about a subject.
LISSIMAN

Joseph Mitton Lissiman was born in  Droitwich, Worcestershire in the West Midlands of England around 1853 and went to school at the Old Swinford Hospital to the north at Stourbridge. The family eventually made their way further north to Birmingham.  Joseph left school at fifteen and by the time of the 1871 England Census, he was living further north again in Staffordshire and working in an apprenticeship role.  Joseph was also deeply religious, a parishioner of the Church of England. Joseph became a Sunday School teacher and volunteered around the church where possible.

In 1876 and still in England, Joseph read an article written by the Ballarat Archbishop Samuel Thornton Joseph about the needs of the Ballarat Anglican Diocese. That year the Archbishop wrote a series of articles for the English journal Mission Life with excerpts published in Victorian papers.  An example is the following extract from the Bacchus Marsh Express with Archbishop Thornton describing the Ballarat diocese and putting out a call to young Englishmen to help. He continued, “the bush clergyman should be ready for plenty of open-air and saddle-work”.

BISHOP THORNTON ON AUSTRALIA. (1876, May 27). The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 – 1945), p. 3. Retrieved December 11, 2019, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88347775

Joseph longed to go. By that time his parents were dead and nothing was keeping him in England.  He approached his local clergymen who knew Archbishop Thornton.  He was happy to put in a good word for him. Joseph saved his money and in 1877 he applied to work with the Anglican church in Australia at his own expense.  There was some hesitation from the church to approve his application because Joseph had no theological training. His devotion, however, was unquestionable.

By June 1879, the dreams of twenty-six-year-old Joseph had come true. He had become a Lay Reader for the Anglican Church in the Ballarat Diocese, assigned to Hamilton Archdeacon Gustaves Innes.  Joseph was based at the small township of Dunkeld, east of Hamilton, and spread the word throughout the wider district. The majestic mountains, Sturgeon and Abrupt (below) overlook Dunkeld.

Some days, Joseph would ride north between the two to the sparsely settled Victoria Valley beyond.

THE VICTORIA VALLEY by NICHOLAS CHEVALIER. Engraver Frederick Grosse. 1864
Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/236368

On other days, he would turn his horse to the west and follow the Wannon River around the foot of Mount Sturgeon and make his way to Cavendish. Or he would head to the south to Penshurst or even further beyond to Macarthur, a round trip of around 130 kilometres. But still, his circuit was not complete.  There was also the parishioners of Glenthompson to the east of Dunkeld.  Joseph’s pay was subsidised by subscribers to the church in each of the areas he preached. However, congregation numbers were low, meaning low subscriptions meant little to pay Joseph for his hard work.

Items of News. (1880, January 22). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918), p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226058043

Its doubtful monetary reward was top of Joseph’s mind. In fact, when not travelling miles on horseback, Joseph was involved with the Dunkeld community. He and Miss Elliot of the town trained the local school children in singing, something met with hearty applause when they sang at the Dunkeld Wesleyan Anniversary Tea.  Later in the month, the Dunkeld school held a “breaking-up jubilee”. Games were played and Joseph acted as a judge.

DUNKELD. (1879, December 25). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918), p. 3.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226053158

Joseph must have been exhausted yet still his passion for his work was evident to all who met him.  But just six months of living his dream, things took a tragic turn.

On 22 January 1880, news came Joseph was ill, attributed to overwork. A good rest was what was needed to return him to good health.  He was taken to the Hamilton Anglican parsonage to stay with Archdeacon Gustves Innes and his wife.

Items of News. (1880, January 22). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918), p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226058043

However, on 31 January 1880, the Hamilton Spectator announced Joseph was dangerously ill with “colonial fever” (typhoid) and the doctors gave “faint hope of his recovery”.

The Church of England Messenger and Eccliseiastical Gazzette reported on his illness,

Parochial Intelligence. (1880, February 4). The Church of England Messenger and Ecclesiastical Gazette for the Diocese of Melbourne and Ballarat p. 6. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197135188

Joseph succumbed to typhoid on 7 February 1880.

JOSEPH MITTON LISSIMAN. (1880, March 2). The Church of England Messenger and Ecclesiastical Gazette for the Diocese of Melbourne and Ballarat p. 8 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197135250

Joseph was buried in the Church of England section of the Hamilton Cemetery.  Archdeacon Innes officiated at the grave while local Sunday School teachers gathered to farewell their friend.  The Hamilton Spectator reported, “he had no relatives in the colony”. But he did have kind friends and as written on his headstone, the cost of the monument was paid for by “a few of his friends”.  Sadly, his surname was incorrectly spelled.

HEADSTONE OF JOSEPH LISSIMAN, HAMILTON (OLD) CEMETERY

Joseph’s obituary in the Hamilton Spectator mentioned,

…his numerous friends at Dunkeld and Cavendish will not easily forget his love for little children, his simple piety and homely ways…it is somewhat pathetic to reflect on so ardent a young spirit quenched in the very commencement of his career. Perhaps, however, his death may teach the lesson of his life, and his cordial relations with other denominations his purity of life and gentle unselfishness may be copied by some of the young members of his flock, who, in a few months, had already begun to look upon him as an old friend, and not as a new arrival in the colony.

In the Diocese publication,  Archdeacon Innes relayed the story of Joseph helping a young girl kicked in the face by a horse.how in the months before

JOSEPH MITTON LISSIMAN. (1880, March 2). The Church of England Messenger and Ecclesiastical Gazette for the Diocese of Melbourne and Ballarat p. 8 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197135250

An interesting point about Joseph’s death was the timing, right in the midst of a Diphtheria epidemic in the Hamilton district.  As seen below, Joseph’s death was not the only one reported on 10 February 1880 but also that of young Esther Smith who died of Diphtheria. It may be possible Joseph was misdiagnosed as there are some similarities in the symptoms of both diseases such as a sore throat, fever, malaise but beyond that, each develops differently.

Family Notices (1880, February 10). Hamilton Spectator p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226055370

Now for a twist in the story…

Life for Hamilton’s Archdeacon Gustaves Innes returned to normal after Joseph’s death, or so it would seem.  On Easter Monday 29 March 1880, he had a great day at the Anglican Sunday School picnic at Nigretta Falls, just west of Hamilton.

NIGRETTA FALLS c1879. Photographer: Thomas Washbourne. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/53200

There was food, games, the Hamilton Brass Band provided entertainment and Gustaves arranged a greasy pig competition.  The Spectator reported, “If the Ven. Archdeacon was loved and respected before Monday, his bonhomie on that all eventful day greatly increased his popularity, the children being practically shown that there is a time for all things.”

On Saturday 3 April 1880, it was reported Gustaves was suffering a sore throat and a replacement was called for the Sunday service. It was thought he’d caught a cold at the Sunday School picnic. His condition worsened and on 6 April it was reported four patients were receiving treatment for Diphtheria at the Hamilton Hospital with another seven receiving treatment at home.  All were at the Sunday School picnic. It was confirmed Gustaves was among the cases.

Two days later Gustaves” condition was critical and his daughter Lily had also contacted Diphtheria.  The next morning, 9 April, Gustaves died aged forty-two leaving his widow and his daughter Lily who recovered from her illness.

The funeral took place the following day at the Hamilton Christ Church with a large crowd in attendance.  Given the growing fear of the contagious disease, it was thought a good idea to leave the coffin outside in the hearse while mourners went inside the church for the service.

CHRIST CHURCH ANGLICAN CHURCH, HAMILTON

A large crowd then followed the hearse to the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery.  Of course, Gustaves was buried in the Church of England section of the cemetery.

I went to the cemetery in search of his grave. After a lot of examining the maps on the cemetery’s deceased search and the various photos I have of photos close by, I have come to the conclusion, the grave below belongs to Gustaves. There is no inscription and like Joseph Lissiman’s headstone, it too appears broken.  He is buried in the next row across and seven graves down from Joseph Lissiman.

GRAVE OF ARCHDEACON GUSTAVES INNES, HAMILTON (OLD) CEMETERY

Gustaves would remain close to Joseph Lissiman after death and given the events after Joseph’s death, that may have been too close for comfort for Gustaves as the story takes another twist,

On 30 April 1880, the Geelong Advertiser broke a story.  Apparently, the ghost of Joseph Lissiman appeared before Archdeacon Gustaves Innes in his study one night in the weeks after Joseph’s death. Not only that, the apparition predicted Gustav’s death.

A REAL GHOST STORY. (1880, April 30). Geelong Advertiser p. 3.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150416314

That revelation led the Hamilton Spectator to break a promised silence. After Gustaves’ death, they were shown a note written by him the morning before his death while he was still apparently lucid. “It was shown to us with a request that we would not publish it, as it could do no good, and might hurt the feelings of his relatives.” Instead, a family friend “with questionable taste, thought proper to furnish a very distorted version of the affair to the public”. The contents of the note sighted by the Hamilton Spectator were different from the account published in the Advertiser.

“Items of News.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 4 May 1880: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225487099

Rather, shortly after Joseph died claimed the Spectator, Gustvaves was home alone when he heard rattling coming from the room which served as Joseph’s sick room. Gustaves rushed to the room, peered into the darkness and when he thought the coast was clear, said to himself with a chuckle, “It must be old Lissiman. What do you want?” Gustaves’ note continued…”Then I had an answer, not audible, but such as possibly a spirit can convey, ‘ Never, mind, you’ll follow me soon.’ It was singular, I never told anyone.”

Items of News. (1880, May 4). Hamilton Spectator p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225487099

Whatever happened on that night must have weighed on Gustaves’ mind for him to pen a note as he lay on his death bed.  All the same, the matter of a ghost, it would appear, was soon forgotten. Gustaves and Joseph, however, were not forgotten. They were remembered together in April 1881 a year after their deaths at the laying of the foundation stone of a new Anglican church at Dunkeld.

THE LAYING OF THE FOUNDATION STONE OF ST. MARY’S, AT DUNKELD. (1881, April 7). Hamilton Spectator p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225487149

But the matter of a ghost was not forgotten.  On 23 July 1881, the Leader newspaper published in a supplement an excerpt from the Wesleyan Spectator, under the headline “The Living and the Dead”, a paper written by Reverend Joseph Waterhouse a year earlier when the first word of a ghost hit the papers.  At least, the Hamilton Spectator‘s version of the story was given, but the Reverend Waterhouse added, “I believe all the above; I will give three instances in which the dead have appeared to me, the living.”

I will leave the topic of ghosts here for now but the next edition will continue on from where the story of Joseph Lissiman and Archdeacon Innes left off including a revisit to the Anglican Sunday School picnic at the Nigretta Falls on Easter Monday 1880. Coming Soon.

If you missed the early editions of the series Broken Memories, you will find them on the links below:

Broken Memories: An Introduction

Broken Memories –  Hamilton (Old) Cemetery Part 1 

 

 

Broken Memories – Hamilton (Old) Cemetery Part 1

Broken Memories is a series of stories about those buried in Western District cemeteries with broken headstones or monuments. Beginning with Hamilton (Old) Cemetery, the posts will be published regularly over the coming months. For more about the series Broken Memories follow the link – Broken Memories – An Introduction.  If you click on any underlined text throughout the post you’ll find more information about a subject.  

HING

The headstone of Sam and Frances Hing is the only one I’ve seen at the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery to date with a Chinese inscription. It also comes with a tragic story.

Frances Mary Ann Lever was born in London in 1856, a daughter of Edwin and Julia Lever. Edwin and Julia and their nine children arrived in Melbourne in March 1866 aboard the Queen of Australia (1) and took up residence in Richmond. Edwin Lever died in February 1871 at Richmond when Frances was around fifteen.

Three years later on 23 November 1874, Frances was eighteen, in Warrnambool and a bride-to-be at the local Christ Church. The groom was thirty-seven-year-old storekeeper Samuel Hing. Samuel Hing who was also known as Sam Hing and Ah Hing arrived in Australia in the late 1850s when in his early twenties.

Family Notices (1875, February 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 1.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11512744

The wedding created much interest in the town. The bridesmaids were local girls, the groomsmen were commercial travellers and the wedding breakfast was held at the Criterion Hotel. According to the Warrnambool correspondent for the Hamilton Spectator, on the morning following the wedding, Samuel with Frances in her wedding dress, “paraded the streets” of Warrnambool. A son Edwin Francis was born to Sam and Frances in 1876 at Warrnambool (2).

It’s possible the Hings resided in Melbourne after their marriage. A Samuel Hing of Little Bourke Street, Melbourne was among a number of Chinese traders charged with selling sly grog in June 1875.  The charges against Samuel Hing were dropped.  There were also several trips between Melbourne and Warrnambool on the steamer by a Mr and Mrs Sam Hing. One example was in March 1876.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1876, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4.   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7433847

In late 1876, the following notice appeared in the Hamilton Spectator announcing Sam was trading at Coleraine.

COLERAINE (1876, November 4). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226039730

However, by early 1877, things weren’t looking good for Sam. He had been trading in Warrnambool as Sam Hing & Co.  The “& co.” was a man called Ah Charn. What happened to Sam’s Coleraine shop is unclear but his Warrnambool shop was in financial trouble. The assets of Sam Hing and Ah Charn were to be sold to repay creditors.

Advertising (1877, February 16). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 3.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5914671

But it didn’t end there.  Sam was charged with concealing assets after it was found he left a parcel of cutlery with Alice Unkles of Oakvale between Port Fairy and Yambuk.

The Argus. (1877, May 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 5.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5923042

Sam was sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour.  You can find Sam’s prison record on the link –  Central Prisoner Register

By April 1878 there was a Samuel Hing trading in Percy Street, Portland. In time, Sam and Frances moved to Burns Street, Hamilton and Sam won first prize for his celery at the Hamilton Agriculture Show in March 1880.  Around the end of October 1881, Samuel was out of town, already absent for about ten days. During that time, Frances took sick and doctors were called. They did all they could, but she died a painful death.

Family Notices (1881, November 10). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918), p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226061270

An inquest was held at Hamilton’s Caledonian Hotel on the afternoon of 9 November. It was found Frances’ “Mysterious Death” as it was headlined was due to a substance she had taken with the intention of terminating a pregnancy resulting in a fatal hemorrhage. Samuel strongly denied Frances was pregnant and told of how she had similar abdominal pain once on a trip to Hong Kong. He added the only medicine Frances was known to take was dispensed by Hamilton chemist Carl Klug and she never used Chineses medicines.

Other witnesses said no medicine entered the house other than that prescribed by Doctors Annand and Scott and dispensed by Carl Klug.  Frances’ brother Ernest also gave evidence. Mr Giles the jury foreman suggested maybe a closer examination of the evidence be made, considering the death only took place the evening before, However, the jury was called to give their verdict and after some deliberation announced their decision.

Sam was so upset about the verdict, he wrote to the Hamilton Spectator.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE (1881, November 15). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918), p. 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226061968

Frances was buried at the Hamilton Cemetery the day after the inquest.

By April 1887, Sam was managing a drapery shop in Thompson Street, Hamilton. Judging by advertising in the Hamilton Spectator at the time, the Chinese traders of the town were involved in takeovers and changes of management. Among them was Erng Long.

Advertising (1887, April 16). Hamilton Spectator p. 3.http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226157050

On Easter Monday 1887 (11 April) around 6.30pm, Robert Gallagher entered Sam’s shop. A previous customer, on this occasion Gallagher tried on clothes. He then attempted to leave without paying, rushing from the shop. Sam tried to stop him but Gallagher pushed him aside leaving Sam bloodied. Gallagher was charged with unlawful assault and theft but given a very light sentence a matter commented on in the Hamilton Spectator.  It was reported Sam was still feeling the effects of the altercation the following day.

Two months later on 18 June 1887, Sam was dead.  When I first looked up Sam’s death in the Victorian Death Index, I found his place of death was Ararat, a place he had no known connection (3). When I’ve seen that scenario in the past, more times than not it has played out the location of death was the Ararat Asylum. Sadly, that was the case for Sam.

ARARAT ASYLUM c1880. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H1887 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/151015

From Sam’s case file from the asylum (4), on 30 May, about a month after the incident with Gallagher, Sam was taken to the Ararat Asylum by Erng Long who nominated himself as Sam’s nearest relative being his brother.  With them was another man described as a cousin. Sam was suffering from acute mania and at the time of his admission, he was “at times very excited waving his arms about. Subject to fits of immoderate crying. At times laughs heartily”. He was also considered dangerous. 

Sam wasn’t eating well on admission but two weeks later on 16 June, an update in his file showed his eating had improved and he was getting up and dressed each day.  He died two days after that update. It appears an inquest was not held into nor did the Hamilton Spectator report on his death. 

Sam’s body was returned to Hamilton and buried at the cemetery with Frances on 20 June.  Canton now known as Guangdong was inscribed on the headstone as his birthplace, however, his prison record gave his birthplace as further south at Macau.

The Hamilton cemetery records show another burial in the grave of Frances and Samuel Hing, an unnamed baby buried on 24 December 1886, five years after the death of Frances and months before Samuel’s death.  The Victorian Birth Index shows the birth of a son to Samuel Hing at Hamilton in 1886. (5). The mother of the child is listed as Terne Ah Hing. The Victorian Death Index shows the boy lived for a day (6). Again, the mother’s name is Terne Ah Hing.  In 1887, another son of Samuel Hing was born at Hamilton (7). The mother’s name listed on the Victorian Birth Index is Journ Ah Hing.

The closest I can find to Sam having re-married is a listing in the Victorian Marriage Index of the marriage of Ah Hing to Margaret Gavin in 1886 (8). Interestingly, a Margaret Ah Hing was admitted to the Ararat Asylum in 1898 (8). She died there in 1924 aged sixty-five. Her parents were unknown. (9)  

At the time of Sam’s death, Edwin Hing, son of Sam and Francis, was twelve. Sadly, Edwin died six years after his father in 1893, drowning after a fall from a boat off Macau. 

Family Notices (1893, June 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 (EVENING).  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65402621

The Hamilton Spectator reported on a letter received by Frederick Edward Mitchell of Portland notifying him of Edwin’s death. Edwin, who was educated at the Hamilton State School, appears to have gone to China not too long after his father’s death. Around the age of seventeen, he was employed by the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service as an interpreter and was working at the time of his death. Edwin had given Frederick’s name as someone to contact in case of an emergency.

Items at News. (1893, June 8). Hamilton Spectator p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225180725

Frederick was two years older than Edwin and was born in Hamilton and likely attended the Hamilton State School like Edwin.  His father James Mitchell was a bootmaker with a shop in Thompson Street, the same location as Sam Hing’s last shop.  Seemingly a friendship formed between Frederick and Edwin sometime during their time in Hamilton and continued beyond.  Frederick went on to become a postmaster at different locations across Victoria and died at Queenscliff in 1940.

SOURCES

(1) PROV, Unassisted Passenger Lists, (1852-1923) Series Number VPRS: 947

(2)  Victorian Birth Index, Edwin Francis HING, 1876, Reg. No. 6024/1876

(3) Victorian Death Index, Sam HING, 1887, Reg. No. 4925/ 1887

(4) PROV, Ararat Asylum: Case Books of Male Patients, Agency No: VA 2841; Series No.: VPRS 7403, Vol E (1887-1890); P0001

(5) Victorian Birth Index, Unnamed Male HING, 1886, Reg. No. 26609/1886

(6) Victorian Death Index, Unnamed HING, 1886, Reg. No. 12912/1886

(7) Victorian Birth Index, Unnamed Male HING, 1887, Reg. No, 28845/1887

(8) Victorian Marriage Index, Ah HING, 1886, Reg. No. 3900/1886

(9) PROV, Ararat Asylum: Case Books of Female Patients; Agency Number: VA 2841; Series No.: VPRS 7401. Volume E (1892-1900); P0001

(10) Victorian Death Index, Margaret AH HING, 1924, Reg. No. 19/1924