Trove Tuesday – A Venerable Couple

While researching Hamilton soldier Samuel Winifred Trigger recently, I stumbled across this wonderful photo at Trove of Samuel and Eliza Trigger, grandparents of Private Trigger, published in the Weekly Times on 14 April 1917.

"A VENERABLE COUPLE." Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 14 Apr 1917: 10. Web. 15 Aug 2015 .

“A VENERABLE COUPLE.” Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 Apr 1917: 10. Web. 15 Aug 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121151983&gt;.

Further searching at Trove uncovered the obituaries of Eliza and Samuel, published in the Port Fairy Gazette on 18 March 1918 and 15 April 1918 respectively, and with the help of various records, I was able to find out a little more about Eliza and Samuel.

Eliza was the daughter of Charles Whittaker and Catherine Totterdale and was born in Naae, Ireland around 1823.  After the death of Charles Whittaker, a Battle of Waterloo veteran, Eliza’s family moved to Somersetshire, England.  That is where she met Samuel Trigger, formerly of Devonshire.  They married in 1847 at Bridgeport, Somersetshire and their first child Emily was born around 1848 in Somersetshire.  They then moved to Avening, Gloucestershire and another daughter, Christina was born in 1850.  Samuel was working as a miller and the family lived in Ball Street, Avening.  Another child, a son Henry, was born before they departed Plymouth in 1852 for Australia aboard the Eliza.  The family arrived at Portland on 9 April 1853.

Firstly, Samuel and Eliza settled at Mt Taurus north of Warrnambool, and Samuel worked as a sawyer.  They eventually moved to the Macarthur/Warabkook area where they remained for the duration of their lives.  Eliza passed away on 6 March 1918 and Samuel, only weeks later, on 1 April.  They were buried at Macarthur Cemetery.  The last piece of significant news they most likely received was that of the death of their grandson Samuel Winifred Trigger at Moquet Farm on 16 August 1916.  The family received notification almost a year later, on 11 July 1917.

After I found the photo of Eliza and Samuel, I posted it to the Facebook group “I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria”, knowing a lot of Trigger descendants are members of the group, many I know personally.  Therefore, after reading the obituaries of the couple, I was not surprised to learn that when they passed, Samuel and Eliza left four sons, two daughters, thirty-one grandchildren and thirty-eight great-grandchildren.

SOURCES

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851

FreeBMD. England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915 

FreeBMD. England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index, 1837-1915

National Library of Australia – Trove Digitised Newspapers

Pubic Record Office of Victoria, Index to Assisted British Immigration 1839-1871

 

 

Trove Tuesday – Spec-tacular

Since late last year, myself and many others have followed the progress of the digitisation of the Hamilton Spectator, from the poll conducted by the Australian National Library and Inside History Magazine through to yesterday when we were able to read the first digitised issues of the Hamilton Spectator from 1870-1873. But we had an extra surprise when we discovered that not only was the Hamilton Spectator (1870-1873)  digitised but also the Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser (1860-1870).

From a quick search, I have already found some treasures in the two papers.  For example, an article about the opening of the Byaduk Wesleyan Church at which my ggg grandfather and Methodist local preacher, James Harman was present.  Also an article about an inquest at Cavendish where another two ggg grandfathers Charles Hadden and James Mortimer were jurors. And in another article, a report of the opening of the Presbyterian Church at Casterton, built by yet another ggg grandfather William Diwell and his partner George Northcott.

The most precious pieces of Trove treasure from the two Specs have been the following articles from the Hamilton Spectator about an accident that ultimately claimed the life of William Diwell in 1871.

diwell1

“MERINO.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 22 Mar 1871 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196304000&gt;.

 

William was just forty-six when he died in the days after his accident.  His wife, Margaret Turner, died in 1869 aged forty-five.  Their early departures left a family of eight, the youngest just seven.  It was interesting to read of William’s funeral and learn he was a Forester.

"MERINO." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1873; 1914 - 1918) 29 Mar 1871.

“MERINO.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1873; 1914 – 1918) 29 Mar 1871<http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196304508&gt;.

Thank you National Library of Australia, Inside History Magazine, Hamiltonians past and present and history lovers everywhere who saw the value of having the Hamilton Spectator digitised.

To track the Hamilton Spectator’s path to Trove glory, these are the posts I’ve written along the way.

Vote 1 – Hamilton Spectator

And the winner is…Hamilton Spectator

Make a Pledge for the ‘Spec’

 

 

Trove Tuesday – Rebecca’s Trees

Trove is great for finding photos and it was the Trove picture search I headed to recently looking for the home of George Hall Harman and his wife Rebecca Graham formally of James Street, Port Fairy.  I knew the house no longer existed and with the help of a family history written by George and Rebecca’s granddaughter Edna Harman,  I thought I had roughly found the location of the house while visiting Port Fairy in January 2014.

During the past year, more information was forthcoming when Mike Harman contacted me.  Mike is my Nana Linda Hadden’s first cousin, both grandchildren of Reuben James Harman, a nephew of George Hall Harman.  Mike passed on some of the work his sister Joan had done on the history of the Harmans and the information about George Hall Harman, caught my eye.  Apparently, when Rebecca passed away in 1902, grieving George planted four Norfolk Pines in front of their home in James Street.

Armed with that knowledge while visiting Port Fairy in January, I headed to James Street.  Port Fairy has many Norfolk Pines lining its streets but in the Harman’s block of James Street there are just four, all in a row and only a few doors up from where I previously visited.  I thought if George did plant the trees those standing before me had to be “Rebecca’s trees.”

233

Once home, I went in search of an old photo of James Street.  The State Library of Victoria’s (SLV) collection was the likely place to find one but instead of searching directly at the SLV site, I chose Trove, my preferred ‘search engine’.  I seem to get better results when I search Trove, I like the filters that aid the search and I can tag my results or had them to one of my many lists.  I searched for “James Street Port Fairy”  and toward the top of the search results was a photo from the Lilian Isobel Powling collection at the SLV.  It was of James Street from 1958 and it gave me more than I expected.

JAMES STREET, PORT FAIRY.  Image courtesy of the State Library Collection.  Photo by Isobel Powling, 1958.  Image no.  H2008.75/102 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/95700

JAMES STREET, PORT FAIRY. Image courtesy of the State Library Collection. Photo by Isobel Powling, 1958. Image no. H2008.75/102 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/95700

The photo was looking right at the house that once stood behind the pines, presumably that of George and Rebecca Harman.  The top of St. John’s Anglican Church is visible in the background.

I did take a photo from a similar angle to the 1958 version but a little further back.

230

Although it is hard to see, the top of the church is now obscured by pines and an electricity pole stands in the same spot as 1958.

Recently on the Victoria Genealogy Facebook group’s feed, there was a discussion about family stories becoming family “fact” so I would like to make sure Rebecca’s trees are more than a family story.  I have a lot of Harman information from the Port Fairy Historical Society, but there is no information about the trees.  The Port Fairy Gazette is a possibility, but my first step will be to confirm exactly where the Harman’s lived in James Street.  However, I’m a little “Harmaned out” at the moment and would like to focus on some of my tree’s other branches, so in-depth research will have to wait for now.

Trove Tuesday – Happy New Year

Following on from last week’s Trove Tuesday post, my Trove search has turned to “Happy New Year.”   Like Christmas, there were the cards home from the boys overseas but with little choice in specialised “New Year” cards, postcards or family photographs were popular for sending “New Year” greetings.

The following postcard is from a solider in England to his wife at home.

 

 

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16584

Images courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H99.166/273 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16584

 

Added to the following postcard of Healesville, was “Compliments of the Season 1/1/1906.”  Written on the back was “Miss M. Prisk, Windermere St. Ballarat. A Happy New Year. 1/1/1906.”  I couldn’t help myself.  I checked the Electoral Roll and found Miss Margaret Prisk living with her family at 503 Windemere Street South, Ballarat.  Around 81 years later, I was living one block down and a street over from the 500 block of Windemere Street.  Margaret and her mother Bertha eventually moved to Richmond.  When I have time, I will follow her up a little further.

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/82840

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H85.70/107 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/82840

The following photo, sent around 1905, had written on the back – “To grandmother with love from “Jack & Jill” aged 7 months.”  It looks like Jack and Jill’s mother had her hands full.

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/73481

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victora. Image No. H2005.34/2674 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/73481

It wasn’t the only time Jack and Jill were the subjects of the a “New Year’s” photo.  Just a few years later they were back at the photographers and written on the photo was “To dear Vera wishing you all a happy new  year.”

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  H2005.34/2675 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/73481

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2005.34/2675 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/73481

Happy New Year everyone.

Trove Tuesday – Merry Christmas

Trove has something for all occasions especially Christmas.  This week’s Trove Tuesday revolves around my Trove search for “Merry Christmas,” the message I’m sending you today.

A general search of Trove for “Merry Christmas” results in hundreds of books, thousands of newspaper articles, journals and sound recordings, but the “Pictures, Photos and Objects” are my favourites because of the treasures that abound such as the following:

 

Handwritten note on verso: France 3/11/16. Dear Meryn wishing you a Merry Xmas & a Happier New Year from "Juggo" or Jack Miller. Sent to address in Victoria.

Christmas Card 1916. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no, .H99.166/285 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16619

The card (above), sent from France on November 3, 1916 was to Meryn and it’s the first time I have found a “Meryn” of any spelling at Trove.  The note on the card read  “Dear Meryn wishing you a Merry Xmas & a Happier New Year from “Juggo” or Jack Miller.”

CHRISTMAS CARD 1911.  Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H82.96/168 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/110126

CHRISTMAS CARD 1911. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H82.96/168 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/110126

The Christmas greeting below, is from the workers at the Ballarat Telegraph Office to their “fellow officers” at the Murtoa Telegraph Office.  It is was from Christmas 1883.

CHRISTMAS CARD 1883.  Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H8704 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/73925

CHRISTMAS CARD 1883. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H8704 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/73925

Portraits or group portraits. as was the case below, were a popular form of greeting card.  Written on the back of the following card was – “Mrs E. C. Rodgers, Hind Street, Portland. Horsham. Dec. 1911. Dear Friends, Just to wish you all a Merry Xmas and a Bright New Year. You will see a good many faces in this group that you know. With best wishes…”

CHRISTMAS CARD 1911.  Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H84.37/4/90 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/129663

CHRISTMAS CARD 1911. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H84.37/4/90 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/129663

The next card is one of my favourite images that I have found at Trove to date and I have used it to illustrate a post before.  It is a Christmas card to an Australian soldier from an admirer he met while overseas.  Unfortunately her name is illegible on the card. POSTCARD c1918.  Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image No. H99.166/327 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16626

POSTCARD c1918. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image No. H99.166/327 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16626

She wrote:

December 1918, Dear Arthur thanks for your most welcome letter I got a few days ago and also glad you have not forgotten. and I think I am the one who loves you best. Jack was here to last week-end going to Blighty on leave. Lucky We shall all be delighted if you come to say good-bye before going back to Australia. For my part I shall be very pleased to see you again. Do not be surprised if you receive a photo of myself one of these days. Every body at Auntie’s place wishes you a Merry Christmas and happy New Year. Also best wishes and —- from myself. Hoping to hear from you again. Believe me. Yours sincerely…

I wonder if they ever met again?

 

Merry Christmas to the many followers of Western District Families and thank you for your ongoing support.  May your 2015 be filled with many new discoveries about your Western District family.

 

Trove Tuesday – Mysterious Aeroplanes

The media is often accused of fear mongering and it seems it was no different 100 years ago.  The onset of WW1 saw reporting that heightened fear with people leaping at shadows believing the Germans were invading Australia.

When I first came across the following article, I thought it was an isolated case.  A Victorian drover, Mr Sutton spotted a plane in the night sky after the noise of his agitated cattle woke him while camped somewhere between Byaduk and Macarthur.  While half asleep, he saw two rockets fired.   According to the article, from the Hamilton Spectator his was not the only sighting in the district.

 

tt1

"A MYSTERIOUS AEROPLANE." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 20 Apr 1918:  .

“A MYSTERIOUS AEROPLANE.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 20 Apr 1918: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119501085&gt;.

 

The copy of the article was not good so I thought I would see if any other papers reported on the sighting.  Did they what.  A search of “Mysterious Aeroplane” at Trove brought up dozens of reports of various people across Victoria claiming to have seen or heard planes.  The Defence Department investigated, however  some witnesses were doubting what they previously thought they heard or saw.  The Minster for Defence clarified the markings of  the planes of the allies and the enemy which surely wouldn’t have allayed the fear of the public.

 

tt3tt4

"The Mysterious Aeroplane." The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 25 Apr 1918: 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. .

“The Mysterious Aeroplane.” The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 25 Apr 1918: 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74220662&gt;.

 

Dr. Brett Holman from the University of New England has written several posts about the mystery planes of the WW1 period on his site, Airminded.  You can read one of those on the following link, with his explanation on the large number of reports of mysterious aeroplanes during that time –  http://airminded.org/2012/05/22/fear-uncertainty-doubt-i/

It reminded me of something similar from a previous Trove Tuesday post, UFO Alert about four flying saucers seen over Hamilton in January 1954.  Sci-Fi films were moving in to the realm of UFOs and aliens and in the same month as the sighting, The Argus was publishing installments of “War of the Worlds.”

Mysterious aeroplanes aside, what was really mysterious for me was the surname of witnesses from the 1915 and 1918 sightings.  The drover who saw the rockets in 1918 was Mr Sutton.  Three years earlier, Eric Sutton of Redbank, NSW saw the lights of  a plane.   I did check.  There were Suttons living at Macarthur in 1914 and Mr Sutton the drover was possibly Issac Sutton from that town so it’s unlikely there was any connection. Just a strange coincidence.

"GARRA SENSATION." Western Champion (Parkes, NSW : 1898 - 1934) 9 Dec 1915: 28. .

“GARRA SENSATION.” Western Champion (Parkes, NSW : 1898 – 1934) 9 Dec 1915: 28. .

 

Trove Tuesday – “Don’ts” for Centenary Week

With Portland celebrating its 180th birthday tomorrow (November 19),  my Trove Tuesday post this week is an article published in the Portland Guardian of October 15, 1934 prior to that year’s centenary celebrations.  Superintendent Clugston of the police department offered some timely advice for those attending the week-long celebration.  My favourite “don’ts” are “Don’t hurry or rush about”, “Don’t drive your car or other vehicle in a careless or improper manner and extend courtesy and consideration for all other road users” and “Don’t Guess”.

""DON'TS" FOR CENTENARY WEEK." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 15 Oct 1934: 2 Edition: EVENING.. Web. .

“”DON’TS” FOR CENTENARY WEEK.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 15 Oct 1934: 2 Edition: EVENING.. Web. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287060&gt;.