Wonderful Western District Women Part 6

March is Women’s History Month.  I started Wonderful Western District Women in March 2017 to take the stories of women I have found in my Passing of the Pioneers posts, delve a little deeper and then showcase their stories by way of the Wonderful Western District Women.  This year I have added a dedicated page as an index. You will see the tab at the top of the page or you can follow the link to read nineteen stories of wonderful women. – Wonderful Western District Women Index

The index includes the next two women, May Robertson and Eliza Cooke. May was an active member of the Hamilton community who championed women’s rights. Eliza, a widow with a young family from Cobden, was a pioneer of the transport industry in the Western District. Remember to click on any underlined text to go to further information on a subject.

ROBERTSON, Marslie May  (c1844-1930) also known as May LEWIS

Marlise May Robertson was born in Inverness-shire, Scotland around 1844 and was seven when she arrived in Melbourne with her parents Angus Robertson and Janet McPherson. It was December 1851 and the family would have been glad to reach dry land.  During the voyage, they faced a shortage of drinking water and a run-in with pirates.  The Robertson family stayed in Melbourne only a few days before journeying to Portland on the schooner Mary Agnes.

PORTLAND BAY c1857. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/75143

It was then on to Straun station on the Wannon River near Coleraine where May’s uncles John and William Robertson had already settled.  Life at Straun was not without its dangers. In 1859, May’s brother drowned in the Wannon River after riding his horse into the river in pursuit of a bullock.  The current swept from his saddle and into the water.  He was fourteen. The following year, Angus Robertson purchased Preston Farm about two miles from Hamilton and the family was on the move again.

In March 1868, May married William Sudgen Price Lewis, the stepson of Richard Lewis, a former owner of Rifle Downs at Digby. William was leasing Hilgay near Coleraine at the time and the couple remained there until around 1871 when they moved to Hamilton.  The Lewis family lived at Pine Lodge in Mill Road, Hamilton. May and William had eight children and some time after 1890, they took a young boy Arthur into their care, raising him as their own.

May was an excellent horsewoman. Her older brother John Straun Robertson rode in the Great Western Steeplechase, and if it was thought proper, I think May would have too.  She showed horses including Gold Dust for Samuel Winter Cooke in September 1890 at the Hamilton Show. Lord Hopetoun, Governor of Victoria and a house guest of Cooke at Murndal, was in attendance. It was day two and the ground was slippery.  While competing in the Best Lady Rider Over Hurdles class, Gold Dust fell at the first jump. May quickly remounted and wanted to continue but wasn’t allowed.   

THE HAMILTON PASTORAL AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. (1890, September 19). Portland Guardian, p. 3 (EVENING).  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63629652

Just months after the Hamilton Show, May and William lost their son Alive in February1891 aged six.  In May 1903, another son James died aged twenty-one.

May was very active in the Hamilton community with charitable works with the Salvation Army. She also joined the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), set up not only to promote temperance but also social and political reform.  The WCTU was very active in collecting signatures for the Women’s Suffrage Petition in 1891.  I was not at all surprised to find May signed the petition. 

Another of May’s interests was the  Australian Women’s National League formed in 1904.  A function of the conservative group was to educate women about politics.  The group was very active leading into the 1913 Federal Election and it seems May was in the thick of it.  In order to dismiss rumours of bribery, she wrote to the Hamilton Spectator saying she did what she did in “the cause of Liberalism”.

BRIBERY CHARGE DENIED. (1913, June 21). Hamilton Spectator p. 6.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225032224

May’s son Arthur Lewis was one of the first Hamilton enlistments for WW1, signing up on 1 October 1914 and leaving two months later.  He dutifully wrote home to May and William describing the sights of Egypt, particularly those with a biblical connection.  In a letter, they received in June 1915 written in April, before Arthur left Egypt for Gallipoli.  He wrote to not worry if there was a delay in receiving letters, as he may be going somewhere it would be hard to get letters out.  He closed  “I will say good-bye for just now, and wishing you all the best of luck – case of accidents: give my best love and wishes to everybody.”

On 12 August 1915, Arthur Lewis was shot in the abdomen at Gallipoli.  He was transferred to the hospital ship Guildford Castle, however, he died the following day and was buried at sea. On 25 September 1915, the Hamilton Spectator reported that the Lewis family had received the first news that not only was Arthur wounded over a month before, but he had died from the wounds.  The news came as a great shock to the Lewis family.   On 5 October, within two weeks of hearing of Arthur’s fate, William Lewis passed away. 

May kept busy. She had joined the  Red Cross, making shirts and knitting socks for the boys at the front.  She also entered her fuchsia and dahlia blooms in a Red Cross flower show.  But then May’s oldest son Angus died in Western Australia in March 1916 at the age of forty-four.  The Hamilton Spectator reported the loss was the third for seventy-two-year-old May in eight months. Not surprising she was not her usual “buoyant and energetic” self and was suffering bad health.

But May rallied finding strength from her charitable works and she joined the Friendly Union of Soldier’s Wives and Mothers.  Also, every Sunday she went to the Hamilton Hospital and handed out flowers to the patients.  Her last visit was Sunday 9 June 1930.

HAMILTON HOSPITAL. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

May wasn’t there to hand out flowers the following Sunday.  She had died the day before on Saturday 15 June 1930 at the age of eighty-six.  She was remembered as Hamilton’s best known and much-loved resident and large attendance at her funeral was testimony to that.

COOKE, Elizabeth Jane (c1842-1932) Also known as Eliza MOREHOUSE

Elizabeth Cooke was born in 1842 and arrived in Victoria when she was eight.   After some time, the Cooke family made their way to Ballarat where, in 1866, Eliza married Charles Morehouse.  Children were born to Eliza and Charles in Ballarat before the family moved to Cobden in 1880 where Charles operated a store.  A son was born on 2 August 1881 but just under five months later on 27 December 1881, Charles was dead. Needing to provide for her family, Eliza continued running the store and from around 1882 was operating coach services.

“Classified Advertising” Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954) 12 August 1882: p.3.  <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23343841&gt;.

In doing so, she pioneered coach services between Cobden, Princetown, and Peterborough.  She moved on to mail services as well.  In 1885, she covered the Cobden to Camperdown run

THE CONVEYANCE OF MAILS. (1885, July 14). The Colac Herald, p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352779

She also set to work improving the store.

“Hampden Shire Council.” Camperdown Chronicle  9 November 1883: p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23348063

By 1895, Eliza’s delivery area had expanded.

THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE. (1895, May 6). Geelong Advertiser p. 4.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article149936139

At one stage, Eliza had around forty horses working on her various coach services and each was selected by her.

ROYAL MAIL COACH, VICTORIA c1890s Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/1696441

You could even take a Morehouse coach from Melbourne to Port Campbell for the summer holidays.

“Camperdown Chronicle.”  SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1888.  p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18585307

Eliza also held the lucrative contract to provide bran and oats to the police of Cobden and Camperdown for their mounts. And not only that, she owned the goods shed at the Timboon railway station.  In July 1900, she told the secretary of the Timboon Progress Association (PA) she intended to pull down the shed and remove it to Cobden. Because Timboon couldn’t afford to lose their shed, the Timboon PA organised petitions to send to the Railway Department requesting they buy the shed.  They heard back in August, with the department having offered Eliz £22 for the shed but she refused. She then wrote a letter to the Timboon PA and told them the lowest she would go on the shed was £30.  If she couldn’t get that price, she would remove the building.  I didn’t find an outcome to the situation but I did note that in December 1905 a report in the Camperdown Chronicle mentioned it had been twelve months since the agitation began for a new goods shed at Timboon. 

 Also In 1900, it was reported Eliza’s business was sold to Mr Smith of Colac and John Bryant of Camperdown. However, two weeks later it was reported she was building a new letting stable, corn store and cottage in Curdie Street, Cobden.

COBDEN NEWS (1900, August 30). Camperdown Chronicle p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26109212

Eliza’s daughter Ethel then went on to marry John Byrant in 1902.

Moving with the times, in 1910, Eliza replaced the horse-drawn coach services between Camperdown and Cobden with a motorbus.

A HORSE-DRAWN COACH AND A MOTOR BUS AT AN UNIDENTIFIED LOCATION. Photographer: John Henry Harvey Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/50441

Away from the transport business, Eliza was busy in the community. She was an active member of the Cobden Presbyterian Church (below) and was and the Presbyterian Women’s Missionary Union (PWMU).  During WW1, she was the treasurer of the Cobden branch of the Australian Women’s National League (AWNL).

COBDEN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collection https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/772413

On 5 August 1931, Eliza celebrated her ninetieth birthday at her home Kooringa, Curdie Street Cobden. The celebration including a birthday cake with ninety candles.  At the time Eliza was President of the Cobden Ladies’ Benevolent Society and still chairing meetings.

Eliza died the following year and was buried at the Cobden Cemetery.  A memorial tablet was unveiled in her memory in 1935 at the Cobden Presbyterian Church.

CAMPERDOWN CHRONICLE. PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY, THURSDAY, SATURDAY THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935. (1935, April 11). Camperdown Chronicle, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28750285

Eliza left three sons and two daughters. One of those daughters was Minnie Jane also very community-minded and involved with many of the same organizations as her mother.  Minnie never married and lived with her mother until her death.  Minnie died in 1945 aged seventy-six.

 

Armistice Day 1918 in the Western District

Today is the centenary of the signing of the Armistice which brought an end to the fighting of WW1.  News arrived in the Western District between 8.30pm and 9.30pm on Monday 11 November 1918 while for other towns, it was the following morning.  Everyone knew it was coming, the question was when. Hopes were high after the surrender of Austria and Turkey but there was still uncertainty and an unwillingness to celebrate until the official word came through.

“AUSTRIA’S SURRENDER.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 5 November 1918: 4. Web. 8 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119508007

Most towns had put in some preparation organising bands and ensuring bunting was at hand ready to decorate the streets.  Early on 8 November, rumours spread around Hamilton, Coleraine and other Western District towns that the signing had taken place.  But they were just rumours.

“PEACE RUMOURS.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 9 November 1918: 4. Web. 8 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119508174

 

“PREMATURE EXCITEMENT” Coleraine Albion and Western Advertiser (Vic. : 1902; 1914 – 1918) 11 November 1918: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119615782

Let’s do a fly around the Western District and see how each town reacted.  In most cases, the reaction was like nothing seen before.

In Ararat, official news came through at 8.30pm on 11 November.  Bells started to ring and the two local brass bands swung into action.

Celebrations continued on into the morning of Tuesday 12 November.

“TO-DAY’S RE[?]OICINGS.” Ararat Chronicle and Willaura and Lake Bolac Districts Recorder (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 12 November 1918 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154297182

Then into Tuesday evening with an open-air concert at Alexandra Park.

“PEACE CELEBRATIONS.” Ararat Chronicle and Willaura and Lake Bolac Districts Recorder (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 15 November 1918: 2. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154298902

In Penshurst, church bells rang and the Penshurst Brass Band played.

“ARMISTICE SIGNED” Penshurst Free Press (Vic. : 1901 – 1918) 16 November 1918: 3. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119565333

Just before 9pm, the Hamilton Spectator received a cable and immediately told those waiting in front of the offices in Gray Street. Bells rang, the bands played and people flooded into the streets.  The Hamilton Brass Band was taken by motor car to Tarrington to tell residents there.

“JUBILATION IN HAMILTON” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 12 November 1918: 6. Web. 5 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119508265

After a false start to celebrations, Coleraine took no time took to get in the spirit.  On 12 November the children marched along the streets of the town.

“OUTDOOR DEMONSTRATION.” Coleraine Albion and Western Advertiser (Vic. : 1902; 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 3. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119615803

At Casterton, the townsfolk were “delirious with joy”.  There was fireworks, bands and dancing.

“Peace! Glorious Peace!” Casterton Free Press and Glenelg Shire Advertiser (Vic. : 1915 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 3. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article152657300

Tuesday 12 November was a holiday in Casterton as it was in most places.

“Peace Celebrations.” The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 3 (Bi-Weekly.). Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222633

Some towns like Sandford and Merino waited until official word was received the following morning. At Sandford, in a prearranged manoeuvre, the sight of the flag going up the pole of the Post Office signalled the end of the war.

“Sandford Celebrations.” The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 3 (Bi-Weekly.). Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222628

At Merino, bells rang and guns fired.

“Merino Celebrations.” The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 3 (Bi-Weekly.). Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222625

Heywood held off with celebrations until official word came after 9am on Tuesday 12 November. Preparations were then quickly underway for a large demonstration at 3pm

“Heywood.” Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 2. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88196524

At Portland, the Observer received an urgent wire from Reuters around 9.30pm on 11 November with the news and the celebrations began.  People got out of the beds and rushed into the streets.

“LOCAL CELEBRATIONS.” Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 3. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88196546

At Orford, a public picnic was planned for the following Friday.

“CELEBRATIONS AT ORFORD.” Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 2 (EVENING). http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91987686

At Port Fairy, there were a couple of hiccups but that did suppress the euphoria.

“ORDERLY CELEBRATIONS.” Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 2 (EVENING). Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91987660

The official message arrived about 9pm on 11 November and the news spread around the town like wildfire.

“Advertising” Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 2 (EVENING). https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/page/8499675

Tuesday was a holiday and just as well because no one would have turned up for work anyway. Port Fairy’s celebrations continued all Tuesday and into Wednesday.

“TUESDAY MORNING.” Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: 2 (EVENING). http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91987687

“AFTERNOON DEMONSTRATION” Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91987687

At Koroit the shops and school closed Tuesday and Wednesday.  A large bonfire was built and on Tuesday night after a parade, it was lit.

“CELEBRATION AT KOROIT” Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74039937

In Warrnambool, people waited outside the Standard office for the news on the evening of 11 November.  Fire bells started ringing as soon as the news was read out.

“PEACE AT LAST!” Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 12 November 1918: 3 (DAILY.). Web. 5 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74039813

A torchlight parade was organised for Tuesday night with a massed tin-can band.

“STATEMENT BY MR. WATT.” Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 12 November 1918: 3 (DAILY.). Web. 5 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74039792

Buildings and streets across Warrnambool were decorated with flags and bunting.

“THE CELEBRATIONS IN WARRNAMBOOL.” Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74039829

Camperdown residents rushed into Manifold Street.

“General Rejoicing.” Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954) 12 November 1918: 2. Web. 10 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32180700

Cobden celebrated too.

“PEACE AT LAST.” Cobden Times (Vic. : 1918) 13 November 1918 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119543664

In Colac, they went “wild”.

“Local Rejoicings” Colac Reformer (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 12 November 1918: 3. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154137089

 

“PEACE CELEBRATION.” The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918) 13 November 1918: 3. Web. 5 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74474856

A torchlight parade took place on Tuesday night.

“COLAC AT NIGHT.” The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918) 13 November 1918: 3. Web. 7 Nov 2018 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74474852

A TIN CAN BAND READY FOR COLAC’S TORCHLIGHT PARADE ON 12 NOVEMBER 1918. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/771371

 

“CELEBRATIONS IN COLAC” Colac Reformer (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 14 November 1918: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154135561

.Despite all the celebrations, the underlying feeling was summed up by the Warrnambool Standard.

 

BIRDS OF PEACE! (1918, November 14). Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 (DAILY.). Retrieved November 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74039924

Christmas 1930s style

Christmas in the 1930s was tough as the Depression set in but the goodwill shown by those more fortunate helped make the day a little happier for those who had nothing.

Fewer advertisements for Christmas gifts was obvious but by the middle of the decade there was something new to advertise, electrical products.  By the end of the decade, Australians realised that the war to end all wars, the Great War, was not the end.  The big message to shoppers throughout the 1930s, a follow on from the 1920s, was to “Buy Australian”.  At least they still had the choice then.

The Victorian Dried Fruits Board came up with this recipe and more were in their free cook book.

Christmas Cake. (1930, November 28). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 12. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72647907

What a nice touch from the Portland Guardian editor for Christmas 1930 as he reminds us not to forget “our brothers the animals” at Christmas.  Now what’s for dinner?

1930b

Christmas. (1930, December 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64294022

Christmas. (1930, December 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64294022

Mrs.  S. Roy Champness generously provided a three-course meal for the unemployed men finding themselves in Kaniva on Christmas Day 1930.  Seven “tramps” had a better Christmas day thanks to Mrs Champness, while in Portland 26 unemployed men ate dinner in the rather unsettling surrounds of the old goal buildings, with the overseer of proceedings, the senior constable of police.  Any wonder he reported the men were “decent and well-behaved”

CHRISTMAS DINNER FOR UNEMPLOYED. (1931, January 16). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72628871

CHRISTMAS DINNER FOR UNEMPLOYED. (1931, January 16). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72628871

The State Relief Committee were calling on all housewives of Victorian to contribute to the making of 10,000 Christmas puddings for Christmas 1931.  Others providing aid to feed the unemployed and their dependents were merchants, farmers and manufacturers.

Wanted.—10,000 Xmas Puddings. (1931, November 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64296734

Wanted.—10,000 Xmas Puddings. (1931, November 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64296734

A “Mother Hubbard Cupboard” was placed in Horsham’s Firebrace Street in the week leading up to Christmas Day 1931.  Non-perishable goods could be put on the shelves, but on December 24, poultry and other perishables could be added.

"MOTHER HUBBARD CUPBOARD" CHRISTMAS CHEER. (1931, December 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72654972

“MOTHER HUBBARD CUPBOARD” CHRISTMAS CHEER. (1931, December 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72654972

Horsham shops were adorned with cyprus greenery and bunting for Christmas 1931.  Good weather gave shoppers a feeling of bright times ahead.

THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT IN TOWN. (1931, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72655454

THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT IN TOWN. (1931, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72655454

Guesstimates in 1932 put the annual Christmas shop at over £1,000,000.  The Portland Guardian considered the effect this would have on Australia’s prospects if all that money was spent on Australian made goods.  Another guesstimate suggested this would generate £250,000 of wages and thus stimulate the economy.

JOBS & CHRISTMAS BOXES. (1932, December 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64299947

JOBS & CHRISTMAS BOXES. (1932, December 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64299947

JOBS & CHRISTMAS BOXES. (1932, December 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64299947

A trip to the pictures over the Christmas period became more popular during the 1930s.

Christmas Talkie Attractions. (1932, December 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64300056

Christmas Talkie Attractions. (1932, December 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64300056

Hopes were up for some old-time Christmas spirit for 1933.  Money was beginning to circulate more than it had in the two years before.  The banks received £30,000 of coins from the Treasury for Christmas 1933, for the purpose of change, while in 1932, the amount required was only £10,000.

1930l

A Merrier Christmas. (1933, December 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72577244

A Merrier Christmas. (1933, December 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72577244

Buying for the man of the house is not an easy task any Christmas.  In 1933, wives were advised to “Please Him,  Not Only Yourself”.  Obviously written by a male and one with considerable tastes too.  It was suggested that a subscription to a magazine such as “National Geographic” would be appealing to a husband, but stay away from the “Vogue” and “Harper’s Bazaar“.

1930n

CHRISTMAS GIFTS and GIVING. (1933, December 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 13. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11718687

CHRISTMAS GIFTS and GIVING. (1933, December 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 13. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11718687

Campbell’s Cash Store also had gift suggestions for men including Fuji Tennis shirts and boxed suspenders.

CAMPBELL'S CASH STORE. (1933, December 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64284389

CAMPBELL’S CASH STORE. (1933, December 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64284389

Another call for “Buy Australian” and possibly a more accurate guesstimate from the Commonwealth statistician regarding the annual Christmas spend.

1930q

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1934, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287561

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1934, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287561

The trend of dieting was taking off in 1934, but girls, forget it at Christmas.

1930s

CHRISTMAS DISHES. (1934, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287556

CHRISTMAS DISHES. (1934, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287556

Buy Australian first, Empire goods second.

Australian Made Gifts and Toys. (1934, December 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287698

Australian Made Gifts and Toys. (1934, December 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287698

Hams were scarce in 1935 after 1000 overcooked in a factory fire at Dandenong.

CHRISTMAS HAMS BURNT. (1935, December 10). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75239494

CHRISTMAS HAMS BURNT. (1935, December 10). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75239494

Camperdown’s famous clock tower was lit up for Christmas 1935.  Christmas Eve plans in the town included the arrival of Santa at 7pm and amplified music broadcast from the Amalgamated Wireless Australia Ltd.  At 10pm, dance music would be played in Manifold Street.

CHRISTMAS FESTIVITIES. (1935, December 17). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32177037

CHRISTMAS FESTIVITIES. (1935, December 17). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32177037

In 1935 at Cobden, Santa arrived at a golf course in a car to meet with children from the Cobden School.  Times sure were changing.

COBDEN. (1935, December 28). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32177289

COBDEN. (1935, December 28). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32177289

The well known Hedditch family of Bridgewater ate Christmas dinner at the same table the family had celebrated around for the previous 90 years.  Those at the table in 1935 included the fifth generation of Hedditchs to do so.

PERSONAL NOTES. (1936, January 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64271313

PERSONAL NOTES. (1936, January 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64271313

Electrical appliances boosted advertising during Christmas 1936.  This article comes from a double page feature in the Argus of December 4, promoting various brands of electrical products including Hecla  kettles.  There was also a message from the State Electrical Commission, remember them, recommending electrical products as a  Christmas gift.

Advertising. (1936, December 4). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 15. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11943599

Advertising. (1936, December 4). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 15. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11943599

Even the geese were thinking about the merits of dieting in 1936!

CHRISTMAS IS COMING!. (1936, December 5). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 18. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11944520

CHRISTMAS IS COMING!. (1936, December 5). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 18. Retrieved December 16, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11944520

Greeting telegrams returned that year.

Christmas Greetings by Telegraph. (1936, December 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64274441

Christmas Greetings by Telegraph. (1936, December 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64274441

The giving of plants at Christmas was beginning to take off in 1937 and J.W. Robinson from the Ormond Plant Farm had some suggestions.

Gardening Column. (1937, December 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64277874

Gardening Column. (1937, December 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64277874

Prosperity was beginning to return to Australia and 1937 was one of the best seen for many years.  There had been a recent decline in wool and wheat prices but things were still looking promising.  As Australian manufacturing grew, more Australian goods were being consumed than ever before.  Apparently in the past Australians were ashamed to give an Australian made Christmas gifts, but with a growing pride in the quality of product being produced, that was changing.

Christmas, 1937. (1937, December 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64277899

Christmas, 1937. (1937, December 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64277899

The Government were offering some Christmas cheer in 1938.

1930z

CHRISTMAS SUSTENANCE SPECIAL ISSUE TO FAMILIES. (1938, December 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73186034

CHRISTMAS SUSTENANCE SPECIAL ISSUE TO FAMILIES. (1938, December 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73186034

The Horsham Times considered the history of Christmas.

1930bb

The Horsham Times. (1938, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73186642

The Horsham Times. (1938, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73186642

Someone or something stole Mr L. Harvey’s turkey the week before Christmas, 1938.

THE CHRISTMAS DINNER THAT VANISHED. (1938, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73186705

THE CHRISTMAS DINNER THAT VANISHED. (1938, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73186705

Christmas 1939 arrived and so had WW2.  It was the first of six Christmases Australians would celebrate while troops were fighting.

An interesting scheme in Victoria was given the go ahead to continue despite the war.  Gifts of Victorian produce could be bought from the Department of Agriculture which would then be sent overseas to British recipients.  Produce included tinned fruit and sultanas.

1930ee

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1939, October 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64394241

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1939, October 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64394241
Posting of Christmas Cards. (1939, November 30). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64394633

Posting of Christmas Cards. (1939, November 30). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64394633

If you couldn’t afford a Christmas ham in 1939, you could always try to catch one at the Horsham Christmas Angling Competition.

angling. (1939, December 8). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73144147

angling. (1939, December 8). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73144147

Fifty children from the Narrawong district enjoyed a visit from Santa and gifts from a Christmas Tree.

Christmas Tree at Narrawong. (1939, December 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64394794

Christmas Tree at Narrawong. (1939, December 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64394794

Just like WW1, the soldiers’ Christmas hampers were a focus, something that would continue into the 1940s.

SOLDIERS' CHRISTMAS HAMPERS. (1939, December 19). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73144465

SOLDIERS’ CHRISTMAS HAMPERS. (1939, December 19). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73144465