Passing of the Pioneers

It’s a bumper Passing of the Pioneers for December with twenty-five new pioneer obituaries from across the Western District.  Christmas is a particularly sad time to lose a loved one and this month there are five pioneers who passed away on Christmas Day.  Two of those were at Casterton on Christmas Day 1917.  As with most months, there are those with something in common. This month, sons or grandsons at war was a common theme.  Remember to click on any underlined words to find further information about a subject.

David Wright BRAYSHAY – Died 16 December 1888 at St Kilda.  David Brayshay and his wife Maria Scott arrived in Buninyong near Ballarat around the time the Union Jack Lead near Warrenheip Street opened in 1857. He opened a drapery with a Mr O’Donnell almost opposite the Robert Burns Hotel in Warrenheip Street.  They then built a brick shop near the centre of the township. When the partnership dissolved, David remained in the brick shop and expanded into groceries. During his time in the town, he was a Buninyong Councillor from 1863 until 1869.

Things turned awry in 1869 when the Ballarat Star reported David’s insolvency and an order of compulsory sequestration. His insolvency case continued in the courts into 1870 and it was not long after David and his family arrived in Hamilton.  David purchased a large amount of land near Buckley’s Swamp and took over the running of Hamilton’s Victoria Hotel.

"Advertising" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 9 November 1870: 1. Web. 25 Nov 2016 .

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 9 November 1870: 1. Web. 25 Nov 2016 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196302997&gt;..

1930 Museum Victoria Collections http://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/766568

THE VICTORIA HOTEL, HAMILTON, 1930. image courtesy of the Museum Victoria Collections http://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/766568

David was again drawn to public life serving as a Hamilton Councillor and  Mayor. On 14 February 1884, the Hamilton Spectator reported David wanted to let 1000 acres of land, reclaimed from Buckley Swamp, for farming purposes.  David’s contribution to reclaiming the swamp was remembered in his obituary in the Hamilton Spectator.

"OBITUARY." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 18 December 1888: .

“OBITUARY.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 18 December 1888: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225762827&gt;.

During December 1888, Hamilton agents Robert Stapylton Bree & Co. advertised the sale of David’s land at Buckley’s Swamp because he was leaving the district.  The following advertisement appeared in the Hamilton Spectator on 13 December 1888 for the auction on the following Saturday.

"Advertising" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 13 December 1888: .

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 13 December 1888: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225759630&gt;.

The sale was then postponed because David, staying at The Esplanade Hotel in St Kilda, fell ill and died the day after the scheduled sale.  He left his widow Maria, one son and seven daughters. Maria died at Hamilton in 1902.

Ann SAVAGE – Died 4 December 1898 at Hamilton.  Ann Savage was born in Walkern, Hertfordshire, England around 1823.  She arrived in Victoria during the 1850s and in 1857 at Geelong married Mark William Hughes, widower and father of two sons.  The couple arrived at Strathkellar around 1859 and their first child Ellen was born at Hamilton that year. In 1862, a son Frederick Charles Hughes was born.  Mark set up a nursery business in Gray Street, Hamilton selling seeds and flowers and the family moved to Gray Street. In 1888, Ann and Mark’s son Frederick married my ggg aunt, Martha Harman, daughter of James Harman,  Mark Hughes died in March 1897 and Ann survived for less than two years after. Ann was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery.

John MacLENNAN – Died December 1908 at Mumbannar.  John MacLennan was born at Contin, Ross-Shire, Scotland around 1825 and arrived at Portland aboard the John Davis in 1853. With a good knowledge of sheep, John was employed by Henry Monro at Upper Crawford Station near Hotspur for six years then at Rifle Downs working for Richard Lewis.  In 1869, John took up land at Mumbannar where he was always willing to let the passing travelling public stop at his homestead.

Elizabeth KINSELLA –  Died 6 December 1914 at Hamilton.  Elizabeth Kinsella was born in Dublin, Ireland around 1828 and arrived at Geelong with her husband Richard Mullin during the mid-1850s. After living in Geelong for a couple of years, they moved to Portland and then Hamilton around the mid-1860s.  They lived in Cox Street and Richard worked as a carpenter. In her later years, Elizabeth was independent and had a great memory of all significant dates from her life.  Elizabeth left three daughters at the time of her death.

John LUCAS – Died 5 December 1915 at Macarthur.  John Lucas was born in Tasmania around 1841 and arrived with his parents in Victoria as a young boy.  He lived at Macarthur from the mid-1860s and he worked as a bootmaker.  He married Bridget Haley in 1863. Bridget died in 1903 at Macarthur.  John’s obituary indicates he had previously been married.  At the time of his death, John had five sons, three daughters, forty-four grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Helen LAIDLAW –  Died 18 December 1915 at Hamilton.  Helen Laidlaw was the second daughter of James Laidlaw and Mary Coates and was born at Learmonth on 24 September 1860.  In the 1870s Helen’s father purchased Lake Wallace Station near Edenhope. He was soon back in central Victoria, purchasing  Amphitheatre Station south of Avoca around 1880.  It was at Amphitheatre Station where Helen married John Fenton of Ararat in 1884.

"Family Notices" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 31 July 1884: 2. .

“Family Notices” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 31 July 1884: 2. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226046744&gt;.

The following year, Helen and John’s first child Gwendoline was born at Ararat. Soon after they arrived in Hamilton and Nellie was born there in 1887. John ran a stock and station agency in Gray Street, Hamilton and served as Mayor from 1904 to 1906.

On 21 June 1915, Helen and John’s eldest son John Wilfred Fenton enlisted, embarking on 18 November 1915. Around two weeks later, Helen fell ill and her condition deteriorated until her death on 18 December at the Fenton home Lantana in Gray Street aged just fifty-five.  On 19 June 1918 John Wilfred Fenton, by then a Military Medal recipient, died from the effects of gassing in France.  Helen was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery and a memorial to John Fenton Jr, appears on the headstone.

fenton-2

HEADSTONE OF HELEN FENTON, OLD HAMILTON CEMETERY.

William BROWN –  Died December 1915 at Branxholme.  William Brown was born around 1825 in Scotland and arrived in South Australia about 1850.  Three years later he married Maria Boyne, arriving in the Western District around 1863.  William worked at Muntham and Grassdale stations near Digby then owned by John Coldham.  By 1869, they were living at Branxholme where their daughter Agnes was born.  William worked as a contractor around the Branxholme district.  In February 1909. William lost a daughter and wife. First his daughter Mrs Rosina Joyce of Branxholme then just ten days later his wife Maria died.  Two of William and Maria’s grandsons, brothers Matthew and Thomas Joyce were both killed in France while serving in 1917.

Isabella IRVINE – Died 15 December 1916 at Mortlake. Isabella Irvine was born at Newcastle on Tyne around 1849 and arrived at Portland with her parents and three siblings in 1854 aboard the Indian Ocean.  In 1875, Isabella married Thomas Keogh and they spent their married life living in Mortlake. At the time of her death, Isabella had three sons and one daughter.  Two sisters were also still alive, Annie Boswell Irvine Small and Tomina Irvine Small both living in Mortlake and married to brothers Thomas and Charles Small.

Henry POTTER – Died 4 December 1916 at Hamilton.  Henry Potter was born around 1841 in Norfolk, England and arrived in Adelaide with his parents around 1854.  The family moved to Portland and Henry became an apprentice plasterer.  After his apprenticeship, Henry entered into a partnership with Thomas Wyatt lasting forty years. Henry married in 1861 to Catherine Stokes.  In 1870, Burns and Wyatt moved to Mount Gambier where they remained for five years completing several large jobs including the Mount Gambier Church of England.  By 1874, Henry and Thomas had moved their business to Hamilton and worked on the Alexandra Ladies College and the Hamilton and Western District College.  In his later years, Henry was a Clerk of Works for the Hamilton Borough Council on projects such as the Hamilton YMCA (below).  At the time of his death, Henry was the oldest living member of the Grange Lodge of Freemasons.

dscn0968

THE FORMER YMCA BUILDING IN HAMILTON.

Thomas McALLEN – Died 16 December 1916 at Port Fairy. Thomas McAllen was born around 1836 in County Clare, Ireland and left when he was twenty-seven with his wife Jane.  They arrived at Port Fairy and first lived at Yambuk then Tyrendarra.  Thomas retired to Port Fairy around 1910 and lived in Polding Street where Jane died in March 1915.  At the time of his death, Thomas had three sons and four daughters. Thomas was buried at the  Yambuk Cemetery.

Janet Manson CLARKE – Died 17 December 1916 at South Yarra.  Janet Clarke was born in Scotland around 1835 and on 23 August 1858 she married John Kennedy MacMillan a young Presbyterian minister.  With a demand for Presbyterian clergymen in Victoria, Janet and John left for Australia soon after their marriage and made their way to Beechworth where John was inducted as Reverend of the Beechworth Presbyterian Church.  In 1869, Reverend MacMillan was appointed to the St Andrews Presbyterian Church and remained there  for thirty-five years.

ST. ANDREW'S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH c1890.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/69513

ST. ANDREW’S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH c1890. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/69513

Janet was also active in the community and was a founding member of the Hamilton Ladies Benevolent Society.  In 1891, Janet travelled to the “old country” Scotland accompanied by one of her daughters.

"Items of News." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 12 November 1891: . .

“Items of News.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 12 November 1891: . <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226165639&gt;.

Reverend MacMillan died in February 1904 and Janet survived him a further twelve years.  When she died, Janet had three daughters and five sons.  She was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery.

Elizabeth BYRNE  – Died 12 December 1917 at Tellangatuk. Elizabeth was born in Liverpool, England and was married there in 1858 to Thomas Jasper.  They arrived at Port Fairy around 1864 on the Birkenhead. By then the couple had three young daughters. After spending some time in Port Fairy, they went to Mount Rouse then Dunkeld before settling at Tellangatuk around 1872. The couple had ten children. Thomas died on 7 May 1900.  Elizabeth and Thomas had a further nine children after their arrival in Victoria and when she died, Elizabeth had twenty-six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Bridget GHEOGHAN – Died 25 December 1917 at Casterton.  Bridget Gheoghan was born in England in 1839 and arrived in Australia in 1853  In 1870, Bridget married  Robert Pierce at Penola. Bridget and Robert lived at Mount Gambier for eighteen years before moving to Casterton around 1880.  At the time of her death, Bridget had one daughter and four sons, with her youngest son John serving in France.  John died of pneumonia in France on 17 November 1918, seven days after the Armistice.

Mary Clare TYNAN – Died 25 December 1917 at Casterton. Mary Tynan was born in Ireland around 1864 and arrived with her husband Richard Bolton in Victoria around 1885. They headed  to Casterton where Richard opened a barrister and solicitor practice.  Better known as Clare, Mary left one son and two daughters when she died during the evening of Christmas Day.  Her son Richard was away on active service at the time of her death and returned to Australia on 1 July 1919.  She was just fifty-four.  Richard Bolton died in April 1920.

William Henry ROSEVEAR – Died 27 December 1917 at Condah.  William Rosevear was born around 1848 and in 1869, he married Margaret Morrison. He was a bootmaker at Condah for forty years.  William enjoyed cricket and football and was a longtime goal umpire for the Condah football team.  He left his widow Margaret and four sons.

John GILL – Died 1 December 1918 at Koroit. John Gill was born at Galbally, Ireland about 1844.  He arrived in Melbourne around 1864 and headed straight to the Koroit district to join family members.  He was a carpenter by trade but turned to farming. In 1891, John married Margaret McGrath and they had three children.  John was buried at Tower Hill cemetery.

Catherine GRANT – Died 7 December 1918  at Digby. Catherine was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1839.  She arrived in Australia aboard the Lord Raglan in 1862 with her parents and they made their way to the Digby district.  Catherine’s was a tragic life.  In 1865, she married Thomas Finlay and they had a son Edward in 1867 but tragedy struck in December 1869 when Thomas died as the result of a fall from a hay wagon.

"COUNTRY NEWS." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 28 December 1869: .

“COUNTRY NEWS.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 28 December 1869: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5809360&gt;.

On 8 March 1880, Edward Finlay then fourteen was accidentally shot while he and a friend prepared for a hunting excursion.  Edward died a short time after.  Catherine lost the two closest to her in the space of eleven years.  She never remarried and continued living at Digby for the next thirty-eight years.  As she grew older, living alone became more difficult and on 15 December 1913 Catherine slipped while tending to her chickens and dislocated her shoulder. In February 1915, Catherine fell in her backyard and broke her elbow.  On 7 December 1918, Catherine died aged seventy-nine and a large cortege followed her remains to the Digby Cemetery two days later.

Charles Henry JOHNSTONE – Died December 1930 at Mortlake.  Charles Johnstone was born around 1843 and arrived in Victoria as a fourteen-year-old.  It wasn’t long before he was drawn to the goldfields and spent time at the Ballarat and Clunes diggings. Still keen to chase his fortune, Charles went to the goldfields of New Zealand but had no success. After his return, Charles selected in the Laang district west of Cobden. In 1871, he  married Louisa Molyneaux from Garvoc. Louisa died in 1923. At the time of his death, Charles had sixty-eight grandchildren and forty-five great-grandchildren.

John McLean GALLACHER – Died 1 December 1933 at Hamilton.  John Gallacher was born around 1867 at Redruth on the Wannon River.  As a young man, John went to the Wimmera as land became available but returned to the Western District. He married in 1899 to Emma Payne and they settled at Mount Eccles near Macarthur. In 1917. the family moved to  Hamilton and John and Emma were given a send-off at Macarthur’s Methodist church in July 1917. In his younger years, John excelled at football, cricket, boxing and rope quoits.  His obituary stated John, “by his sterling manliness. won hosts of friends, by whom he was highly respected.”  John and Emma had five daughters and one son and each of the girls became teachers.  John was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery and forty-five cars followed the hearse to the cemetery.

Janet Scott MacDONALD – Died December 1934 at Peterborough.  Janet was born around 1844 near Mount Buninyong. Her parents had arrived three years earlier from Perth, Scotland.  She married Charles MacGilivray in 1869.  In 1873, they moved to  Peterborough settling “in the wilderness on the banks of Curdie’s Inlet”,

CURDIE'S RIVER. PETERBOROUGH. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64687

CURDIE’S RIVER. PETERBOROUGH. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64687

In the early days, Janet welcomed pioneering clergymen into her home and Charles MacGilivray was behind the construction of the first church at Peterborough. Janet was often turned to when a history of the town was sought.  She could tell of the times she was lonely when barely anyone else lived around or the tales of the many shipwrecks along the coast near Peterborough.  Janet’s six sisters all lived into their eighties and two were living at the time of her death.

Thomas O’HALLORAN – Died 24 December 1934 at Hamilton.  Thomas was born at Allansford around 1868. His first job was with James Farrar, a Warrnambool coachbuilder. He then went to Macarthur operating  a coachbuilding and undertaking business.  In 1893,  Thomas married local girl Mary Ann Lucas a daughter of John Lucas (listed above). Around 1915, Thomas and Mary Ann moved to Hamilton and Thomas opened Thomas O’Halloran & Son undertakers in Lonsdale Street.

"Advertising" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 3 March 1917: 8. .

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 3 March 1917: 8. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129397006&gt;.

Mary Ann died in 1929 and since Thomas’ health was not good, he retired soon after. Thomas was considered  one of the best cabinetmakers in the state.  His craftsmanship is still on display today in St Mary’s Catholic Church Hamilton, with Thomas having made the tabernacle and canopy over the altar and the confessional. He also made the St. Mary’s Church WW1 Roll of Honour. It was in the same church a Requiem Mass was held for Thomas on Boxing Day after he died on Christmas Eve from a lengthy illness.

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63044

INTERIOR ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH HAMILTON. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63044

William Charles PEVITT – Died 25 December 1938 at Heywood. William was born around 1857, a son of Henry and Harriet Pevitt.  He married Alice Hannah Scantlebury at Sandford in 1880 and they had four children.  Alice died in 1893 at Heywood aged thirty-one.  After Alice’s death, William lived with family at Merino and then Homerton. In 1907, William married Mary Ann Brown at Warrnambool. William returned to Heywood and lived there until his death.  Mary Ann died around 1935.

George Edwin CHARMAN – Died 21 December 1942 at Coleraine.  George Charman was born in  1852 at Moorabbin.  He married Elizabeth Hollis at Portland in 1877. They spent the first nine years or so of their marriage at Portland before moving to Coleraine where they remained and had eleven children.  A sad time came in 1897 when their third daughter Mary Ann died suddenly aged fourteen.

"OBITUARY" Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 4 January 1943: 4 (EVENING). .

“OBITUARY” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 4 January 1943: 4 (EVENING). <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64383343&gt;.

In 1922, Elizabeth died and in time George moved in with his daughter Edith, wife of Ben Rigby.  It was there George died in 1942.  He was buried at the Coleraine Cemetery.

James WILSON – Died 25 December 1944 at Portland.  James Wilson’s parents were earlier settlers at The Lagoons, Bridgewater where he was born in 1863.  In 1886, he married Priscilla Hollard.  James ran a hairdresser and tobacconist shop in Portland and did some work for Messrs Learmonth & Co auctioneers in Portland.

"Mr. James Wilson's New Building." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 14 November 1894: .

“Mr. James Wilson’s New Building.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 14 November 1894: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65397334&gt;.

He spent time in Melbourne running a business and living at 346 Burwood Road Hawthorn in 1918 before moving back to Portland in 1937.  James was closely associated with the Methodist Church and Sons of Temperance.  Priscilla died in January 1943 at Portland.  James and Priscilla had no children.

William Henry ANDERSON – Died 23 December 1950 at Ballarat. William Anderson was born around 1861 at Linton and married Edith Gardiner of Smythesdale.  The couple moved to the Otways, early pioneers of the district.  William ran dairy farms at Princetown and Carlise River.  They remained in the district until 1914 when William and Edith moved to Wangoom, near Warrnambool but remained in dairy farming.  After WW1, William’s returned servicemen sons took up soldier settlement blocks at Chocolyn and William and Edith moved there until 1930. They then moved to Ferguson Street, Camperdown. William was a member of the Oddfellows and enjoyed following football and cricket.  He was buried at the Camperdown Cemetery.  Edith died in November 1951 at Camperdown.

Passing of the Pioneers

It’s four years this month since Passing of the Pioneers began.  Starting out with the Portland Guardian, Horsham Times and the Camperdown Chronicle, the number of newspapers at Trove from which I can now draw obituaries has increased considerably.  This month, it is with great pleasure that I am able to post my first obituary from the newly digitised Hamilton Spectator (1870-1879).  It wasn’t a Hamilton person, rather Thomas Anderson of Portland, with his death reported on by the Spec correspondent.  It’s also the first Passing of the Pioneers with the blog’s new layout.

There are a further fifteen pioneer obituaries included in this post and once again, the stories that come with them are good reading.  The July pioneers have been added to the Western District Families Pioneer Obituary Index taking the total number to 566.

Thomas ANDERSON:  Died 12 July 1870 at Portland.  Thomas Anderson, born about 1805, was an early arrival in the colony with the Hamilton Spectator correspondent believing in 1870 he was the oldest colonist in Portland other than the Hentys.  Thomas was a publican and ran the Old Lamb Inn Collins Street Melbourne around 1840 to 1843 as reported in the Spectator of 13 July 1870. That is also recorded on the Port Phillip Pioneers website.  Once in Portland, Thomas was for a time the owner of the Union Inn in Julia Street.  He lived at Clinton Cottage in Portland.   The funeral procession was described by the Spectator correspondent on 16 July 1870, as “one of the largest…which has been witnessed in this district”.  Present were magistrates, bankers, the President of the local shire, the Mayor of the Borough of Portland and “…every class of the community, in carriages, on horseback and on foot, from every part of the district…”.

OLD LAMB INN c1858 by George McRae, Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H36480  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/274274

OLD LAMB INN c1858 by George McRae, Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H36480 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/274274

Jane LAMB:  Died 1 July 1890 at Heywood.   Jane Lamb’s obituary brings together three generations of pioneer obituaries for the Steven family, with Jane joining her daughter Johanna Steven and granddaughter Isabella Reid on the Western District Family Pioneer Obituary Index. I have found with this family they were often listed as both Steven and Stevens. In Jane’s obituary, it was Stevens, however, I do think it is Steven.  Jane married Robert Steven/s in Scotland and they travelled to Victoria with their family.  Robert ran a bakery and confectionary shop in Julia Street and later owned “Wee Station”, as it was known locally, a small property at South Portland.  Robert passed away seven years before Jane.

Robert DONELAN:  Died 25 July 1901 at Karabeal.  Robert Donelan was born in Galway, Ireland around 1833.  He arrived in Victoria to live with his uncle, Hamilton’s first Police Magistrate, Acheson Ffrench of Monivae Estate near Hamilton.  Robert’s obituary said his family appeared in Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland.  Indeed, they did, the 1912 edition, for example, sees the Donelan family of Killagh, Galway on page 196.  More information about Killagh with photos is on the following link – Killagh House.

Robert married Bridget Lalley in 1863 and around 1870 they started the Karabeal Inn on the Cavendish/Dunkeld Road.  The couple had ten children, however, not all survived. There is a sad reminder, a couple of kilometres south of Cavendish.  It is the site of the lone graves of two of Robert and Bridget’s children, Eliza and Viola, both dying at age one, Eliza in 1875 and Viola in 1886. A photo of the grave is on the Victorian Heritage Database website.  Robert also sat on the Shire of Dundas and at one stage put his name up for candidature in the Victorian Parliament but later withdrew it.

James SMITH: Died 5 July 1914 at Bringlebert South.  Born in Wiltshire, England around 1833,  James Smith arrived in Victoria aboard the Ugiauah and apparently was one of the last of the early Henty employees to pass.  James spent time at the diggings and then carrying goods along the Portland Road. Then he lived at Sandford before eventually settling at Apsley.  A further obituary is available on the link http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129451701.  More about the Smith family is available on theGlenelg & Wannon Settlers & Settlement website 

William Grange HEAZLEWOOD:  Died 10 July 1914 at Portland.  William Heazlewood, it was said, was the first European child born at The Grange (Hamilton) at the time of his birth in 1844.  His father Robert Heazlewood had a blacksmith shop by the banks of the Grange Burn, that ran through the settlement of The Grange.  The map, below, from the interpretative sign at the site of The Grange in Digby Road Hamilton, shows the “Smithy” shop next to Blastock’s Grange Inn to the right.

097 (2)

MAP OF THE GRANGE. Interpretive board, Digby Road Hamilton.

 

099 (2)

After a few years, the Heazlewood family moved to Portland.  When old enough,  William began a printing apprenticeship with the Portland Guardian.  In 1864, he married Miss G.M.Richards who arrived in Portland ten years earlier aboard the Nestor. William was for a time the Portland pound keeper and was a member of the Sons of Temperance.  He purchased a property, Cherry Grove, in North Portland a planted a large orchard.  He remained on the property until around 1910.  William passed away after collapsing while walking along Henty Street, Portland.

Francis Thomas BEGLIN:  Died 11 July 1914 at Portland.  Frances Beglin died after collapsing while helping to unload the cargo from the SS Casino.   Born about 1849 in Portland, Francis was a cornet player with the Portland Band and was a member of the Portland Battery Garrison Artillery.

SS CASINO.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H92.302/23 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/195620

SS CASINO. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H92.302/23 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/195620

 

James William PASCOE: Died July 1917 at Terang.  James Pascoe was ninety-eight years and six months old when he passed away in 1917 and he did a lot during that time.  Born in Cornwall in 1819, he worked as a farm hand as a boy then in the Cornish mines.  Word of gold discoveries in Victoria reached Cornwall, and James and a group of other men travelled to the Victorian goldfields, landing at Geelong in 1852 and then travelling on to Castlemaine. James then went on to Ballarat and was there at the time of the Eureka uprising in 1854.

James discovered work as a carrier was more lucrative than looking for gold, and he starting carrying goods from Melbourne to the Bendigo goldfields.  He then settled at Creswick long enough to operate a store there, Pascoe and Thomas.  Next he returned home to Cornwall before going back to the Creswick district and operating a hotel and general store at Newlyn. Around 1887, James moved south to a bush block at Glenfyne, until the early 1890s when he moved to Terang for the last twenty-five years of his life.  That was the most settled period of his life.

James DOWNEY:  Died 13 July 1918 at Koroit. James Downey was born in Tipperary, Ireland around 1822 and arrived in Victoria in 1853.  He settled  in Koroit where he remained for the next sixty-five years.  During his life, James went from a farm labourer to a rich landowner, but he never forgot where he came from.  He enjoyed mixing with his employees and lending a hand when needed.  James married Margaret Moloney in 1864 and they had seven children.  James was a devout Catholic and was a charitable community member.

John FLETCHER:  Died 31 July 1918 at Branxholme.  John Fletcher was born around 1842 in Scotland and arrived in Portland as a child of eleven.  He married in 1867 and he and his wife had eleven children.  John worked as a station manager, managing well-known properties including Ardachy, Mundarra and Straun and was considered a fine judge of livestock and an expert on Merino sheep.

mundara

MUNDARRA WOOLSHED. Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. Image no. H95.200/1079 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230709

William WILSON: Died July 1924 at Geelong.  William Wilson was born in Somersetshire in 1833.  He married in the early 1850s to Jane Clements and in 1855 they sailed to Australia arriving in Geelong.  The couple’s eldest three children were born in Geelong before the family moved to Ballarat hoping for some luck with gold prospecting.  A further eight children were born during their time in Ballarat.  By 1874, William had a selected land in the Heytesbury Forest at Scott’s Creek.  In the early 1880s, William moved into Camperdown, although he did keep his property at Scott’s Creek.  While in Camperdown, he ran a business in Manifold Street.  William was ninety-one at the time of his death.  Jane passed away around twenty-five years before him.

John CROMRIE:  Died 16 July 1927 at Warrnambool.  John Cromrie was born in Northern Ireland and first lived in Melbourne when he arrived in Victoria around 1860.  After about six years, he moved to Warrnambool and remained there sixty years until his death.  He first ran a saddlery business and then moved into coachbuilding.  He was in partnership with Mr A. Purcell and they operated from a large premises in Liebig Street.  John was also the oldest member of the St. John’s Presbyterian Church committee.  He was a widower of around forty years and had a family of five children still remaining at the time of his death.

WARRNAMBOOL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1903.  Photographer Joseph Jordan.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H96.160/837   http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/53807

WARRNAMBOOL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1903. Photographer Joseph Jordan. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H96.160/837

Jane WILSON:  Died 15 July 1934 at Ascot Vale.  Jane Wilson was born in Ballarat in 1860 and was the daughter of William Wilson (above).  After her marriage, Jane lived in Terang for around forty years before moving to Melbourne about 1920.  In 1885, Jane married John George Boyes.  John died in 1902 and Jane raised their three children alone.

Matthew Charles RHOOK:  Died July 1936 at Hamilton.  Matthew Rhook was born at Narrawong in 1854.  His first job was for George Lamb, a Portland butcher and he then worked at various large properties around the Portland and Port Fairy district.  He also spent time gold prospecting in Northern Victoria.  Matthew married Elizabeth Jane Quick in 1878.  They eventually made their way to Hamilton, settling in Eversley Street.  At the time of WW1, two of Matthew and Elizabeth’s sons, Archie and Harry, enlisted.  Harry was killed overseas while Archie returned home.  A profile for Archie Rhook is available on the Hamilton’s WW1 pages.

Angus Stuart REID:  Died 22 July 1937 at Camperdown.  Angus Reid was the son of Stuart Reid and Jessie Craig and was born at Eddington in 1878.  He attended school at Geelong Grammar before working in the mercantile business in Melbourne.  He returned to Eddington to take up the running of the station

EDDINGTON HOMESTEAD, Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/216810

EDDINGTON HOMESTEAD, Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/216810

In 1916, Angus married Irene Thomson of Hawthorn.

 Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 8 Jul 1916: 10.  .

Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 8 Jul 1916: 10. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page13616253&gt;.

In 1918, Stuart Reid and in 1923, Angus’ mother Jessie died.  After the death of his mother, Angus bought out the beneficiaries of her estate, thus owning Eddington outright.  He sold the property in 1931.  Angus’ obituary has a lot of information about the lives of his parents.

Henry HAMMOND: Died 4 July 1941 at Cobden.  Henry Hammond was born in Dandenong around 1859 and during his life he travelled widely throughout Australia from Queensland to Western Australia.  However, in the early 1890s, Henry settled down at Cobden.  He carried timber using his bullock team for construction of the Cobden Pioneer Butter Factory.  He also did fencing for the Heytesbury Shire and ran a butcher shop.  Henry’s wife died around twelve years before him.

Fanny Lea PICKEN: Died 9 July 1941 at Camperdown. Fanny Picken was born in Geelong around 1856 and was the last remaining child of James Picken, a Camperdown legal practitioner.  Fanny never married and devoted much of her time to the St. Paul’s Church of England choir.  Fanny and her sister were members of the choir for many years.

ST. PAULS CHURCH OF ENGLAND, CAMPERDOWN.  Image Courtesy of the  J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/216509

ST. PAULS CHURCH OF ENGLAND, CAMPERDOWN. Image Courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/216509

Thomas WEBB: Died  19 July 1943 at Cobden.  Thomas Webb took his first steps while sailing with his parents from England to Australia.  He was born in Birmingham around 1869. Thomas was the local Cobden undertaker for forty-four years as well as blacksmith and wheelwright.  In addition to his role as secretary of the Cemetery for many years, he was also a Justice of the Peace and a past Master of the Cobden Freemason’s Lodge.  He also was a regular at the local football.  Thomas’ wife died only a month before him.  They had no children, although there was an adopted son who was missing in action while serving during WW2.

 

 

Passing of the Pioneers

Welcome to November Passing of the Pioneers with a Stawell, Port Fairy and Irish flavour. The pioneers include a licensee, a chemist and an inventive engineer.

If you are new to the monthly Passing of the Pioneers, the obituaries listed here are a summary of the original obituaries, using dates and other information direct from the obituary. I make no attempt to check or correct information contained in the obituary. The original obituaries are found by clicking on the names of the pioneers.

A word of warning, while obituaries often have a wealth of information, that information must be treated with caution.  Naturally, obituaries are written using second-hand information and recall events that occurred many years before the subject’s death, therefore that information can often be incorrect and sometimes even fanciful.   Therefore, information found in an obituary can only used for a guide to find primary sources to qualify the claims of an obituary.

Alexander RUSSELL: Died 27 November 1867 at Port Fairy. When Alexander Russell first arrived in Port Fairy in 1847, he took up his chosen profession as a doctor. However, upon his return to the “old country” he gave away medicine and moved into the field of “mercantile speculation” and upon his return to Port Fairy established the Moyne Mill using machinery he brought back from Scotland. Alexander was also the first Mayor of Belfast (Port Fairy) and was elected to the State parliament as member for Villiers and Heytesbury. He relinquished his seat due to ill-health.

Mary D. KEATING: Died 8 November 1914 at Port Fairy. Mary Keating was born in Port Fairy and before her marriage to William Wall, she worked as a teacher at the local Catholic school. William was the Secretary of the Belfast Shire. During her life, Mary was a tireless worker for the Catholic church. William predeceased Mary by fifteen years and they had four children.

Michael QUINLAN: Died November 1914 at Hawkesdale. Michael Quinlan was born in Tipperary, Ireland around 1835, and travelled to Australia when he was around twenty-four. He settled first around Koroit, before taking up land at Hawkesdale. He was a Minhamite Shire Councillor and enjoyed visiting the winter race meeting at Warrnambool.  Michael left one daughter at the time of his passing.

George KAY:  Died 11 November 1915 at Stawell. George Kay lived his forty-nine years in Stawell, in that relatively short time left his mark. He began work at the Stawell foundry and worked in engineering. He took up a partnership in the Kay & Co. Stawell Foundry and remained there until his death. One of his engineering feats was inventing a judging machine for the Stawell Athletics Club, famous for the Stawell Gift. The machine earned him much praise, including from the Governor of Victoria on a trip to Stawell. He was a member of the Stawell Rifle Club and a member of the Pride of Wimmera Lodge.  He left a widow and two daughters.

William WAREHAM: Died 3 November 1916 at Woolongoon. William Wareham’s obituary states he was born at Box Hill in 1844 , however his Victorian Birth registration shows Moonee Ponds in 1845.  At age nineteen, William went to work at Woolongoon Station, near Mortlake. He married and settled in the area.

OBITUARY. (1916, November 8). Mortlake Dispatch (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved November 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119795904

OBITUARY. (1916, November 8). Mortlake Dispatch (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved November 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119795904

He left a large family including thirty-two grandchildren.

Mary KELLY: Died 19 November 1916 at Stawell. Mary Kelly was born in Tipperary, Ireland around 1836 and travelled to Australia with her parents when she was a girl. She married John Kay and they settled at Great Western.They later moved to Stawell and ran a wine saloon in Main Street before becoming licensees of the Star Hotel (later known as the Stawell Club) in the late 1890s. Family members continued to run the hotel until 1910 when John Alison took over the licence, but Mary continued to own the building.

Margaret ANDERSON: Died 20 November 1916 at Port Fairy. Margaret Anderson was born in Melbourne in 1844 and moved to the Western District with her family at the age of three, taking up residence at Rosebrook. She married John Wright and they settled at nearby Yambuk. Four years prior to her death, Margaret moved into Port Fairy. She was a devout member of St Patrick’s Catholic Church at Port Fairy. Three sons and one daughter were alive at the time of her death, with son George a parish priest in New Zealand.

ST. PATRICKS CATHOLIC CHURCH, PORT FAIRY. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no H32492/7521 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/61612

ST. PATRICKS CATHOLIC CHURCH, PORT FAIRY. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no H32492/7521 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/61612

William DAWSON: Died 30 November 1916 at Stawell. William Dawson was born in Stawell around 1868 and followed his father into the chemist business. After his father’s death, William took over the family chemist shop. William’s passion was sport and he was involved in most of what was on offer in Stawell.  He rode high-wheeled bicycles when they were in vogue and was an official at the Stawell Cycling Club. William was also a cricketer and played with state side, the Victorian Rangers. He was also a founding member of the Stawell Rifle Club and Golf Club and was a keen fisherman. Sport aside, William was a prominent member of the Stawell Brass Band.

Bridget MAHONEY: Died 15 November 1918 at Port Fairy. Bridget Mahoney was born in Ireland in 1823. She arrived in Australia with her husband John Clancy in 1855, travelling from America. Bridget and John settled on a farm at Yambuk.  John passed away around 1895 and Bridget continued to live at Yambuk until seven years prior to her death when she moved to Port Fairy to live with her daughter Lizzie.

William REES: Died 29 November 1918 at Stawell. William Rees was born in South Wales around 1830. He began an apprenticeship as a joiner and for the next five years he travelled to Canada and the United States, arriving in California in 1853. In 1854, he was lured to the goldfields of Victoria, including Ballarat, Carisbrook and Ararat. He married another native of South Wales in Jane Symons in 1855. William and Jane arrived at Stawell in 1857. William  worked as a carpenter for the Oriental and North Cross Mining Company for many years.

 

Passing of the Pioneers

Seventeen more obituaries of Western District pioneers join the collection this month, and what a group they are.  I must say I had to pass a lot over, but it will ensure Passing with the Pioneers will be going to at least January 2014!  New papers at Trove has guaranteed that. Obituaries came from the Portland Guardian, Horsham Times and Ballarat Courier.

There are a couple of special ones, those of  James HENTY and Rebecca KITTSON and I highly recommend that you read the obituary in full.  I actually found Rebecca’s obituary rather moving and after driving through the Bridgewater area recently, I have great respect for her family and others that settled there.  To read the full obituary, just click on the pioneer’s name and the obituary will open in a new tab.  Some are a little hard to read, but magnifying the page helps.

I have also included a “young” pioneer who has a family link to me.  Thank you to Rachael Boatwright for allowing me to include a photo of her family member.

James HENTY: – Died 12 January 1882 at Richmond.  I thought trashy magazines today told all, but the obituary of the Honourable James HENTY M.L.C. shared every detail of the last twenty-four hours or so his life.  How can I possibly give a summary of the life of James HENTY, one of the famous pioneering HENTY clan?  Instead, read the obituary, it is great!  Sadly I think James’ life may have ended prematurely, if that is possible at eighty-two, due to a collision with a Newfoundland dog the week before.

JAMES HENTY c1855.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H83.158/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/290239

JAMES HENTY c1855. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H83.158/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/290239

Hugh MCDONALD: Died 30 January 1899 at Portland. This is a timely obituary coming so soon after my Portland trip.  While there, I learnt something of the wreck of the steamer Admella in 1859 and the Portland life boat crew that went to her aid. Hugh McDONALD was one of the brave men on board the life boat during that daring rescue.

William GARDINER: Died 17 January 1904 at Warracknabeal.  William GARDINER, another pioneer with an interesting life.  He arrived in Victoria in 1849 aboard the barque Saxon and spent time in Melbourne, Geelong and the goldfields, before heading to New Zealand.  On his return to Australia, he lived in Port Fairy and Hamilton, working as a journalist, before moving to the Wimmera as a correspondent for the Belfast Gazette.  He like it so much, he decided to select land at Warracknabeal.  He also worked as a correspondent for the Horsham Times and built houses!

Jean McCLINTOCK:  Died 19 January 1904 at Melbourne. While only forty at the time of her death and not an “old pioneer”, I have included Jean as she was the sister-in-law of  Alfred Winslow HARMAN.  Jean married William MILLER and they resided at Rupanyup.  After some illness, Jean travelled to Melbourne for an operation, but she died as a result.

Jean McClintock & William Eaton Miller. Photo courtesy of Rachael Boatwright & family.

Joseph JELBART: Died 17 January 1904 at Carapook. Joseph worked as the mail contractor between Carapook and Casterton up until his death. Prior to that, he had worked as a blacksmith and a wheelwright at Chetwynd, Merino and Natimuk. Interesting coincidence, just as Joseph did, his father and brother both died on a Sunday morning in the same house.

Rachel Forward READ: Died 15 January 1904 at Lower Cape Bridgewater.  Rachel Forward READ and her husband Richard Charlton HEDDITCH arrived in Adelaide in 1838 and settled at Cape Bridgewater from 1845 after a stint teaching at the Portland Church of England school.  They resided at the Lal Lal Homestead.  The  Victorian Heritage Database listing for Lal Lal includes a letter home by Rachel after their arrival at Cape Bridgewater.  Rachel was buried at the Cape Bridgewater cemetery rather than the Hedditch family cemetery at Lal Lal.

Donald McRAE: Died 12 January 1914 at Tooan.  Donald McRAE was born in Inverness, Scotland in 1842 and travelled with his parents to Portland. In 1865, he moved to Muntham near Hamilton to farm with brother. The pair eventually selected 320 acres of land each at Natimuk.  Donald was a member of the Horsham Caledonian Society.

Samuel WALKER: Died 24 January 1914 at  Ballarat. Samuel WALKER was born in Cheshire, England around 1828 and travelled to Australia in 1852.  After his arrival on the goldfields of Ballarat, he set up a soda water factory which proved profitable for him.  He then became a partner in Evans and Walkers and worked as an accountant.  He was also the registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages at Ballarat from 1872.

Selina MILLER: Died January 1917 at Wickliffe. Selina MILLER had resided at Wickliffe for almost sixty years.  She was twice married.  Her first husband was Mr HAIG and her second, George HARRIOTT.

Elizabeth HUBBARD: Died 3 January 1919 at Horsham.  Elizabeth HUBBARD was born in Norwich, England around 1831 and travelled to Australia with her husband, Mathias HARDINGHAM in the mid-1850s.  From Geelong, they travelled to the Horsham area and were two of the first pioneers in that district.  Mathias ran the Horsham Hotel for some time.

Christina FOX: Died 8 January 1921 at Vectis.  Christine FOX was born in Yorkshire, England around 1835.  As a teenager, she travelled to South Australia with her parents.  She married Robert SANDERS who had also travelled with his parents on the same immigrant ship.

John W. DAVIS: Died 24 January 1928 at Horsham.  John or “Jack” as he was known, arrived in Australia as a three old, living in Williamstown and then Stawell.  He played with the Temperance Union Band in Stawell and then moved to Horsham in 1877 to play with one of two brass bands in the town.  Known throughout the northwest for his ability as an euphonium player, Jack was also a bandmaster at Natimuk and Noradjuha.

Rebecca KITTSON: Died 4 January 1929 at Portland. What a grand old pioneer Rebecca KITTSON was.  A colonist of eighty-eight years, she was a month from her 102nd birthday.  Arriving in Melbourne from Ireland aged eleven, she spent the next year in Melbourne, before joining her family at Cape Bridgewater where her father James Kittson had settled.  She married Reverend William LIGHTBODY, a Wesleyan minister in 1852.  This obituary is a must read.  Mrs LIGHTBODY, as she was known for most of her life, was the last surviving member of her family and the obituary gives a glimpse at how the KITTSON’S came to be in Australia.

Obituary. (1929, January 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved January 17, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64268096

Adrian ANDERSON: Died 16 January 1932 at Horsham. This is a first for Passing of the Pioneers.  Adrian ANDERSON was an immigrant from the United States. Wisconsin to be precise. He arrived aged four, with his parents and resided in Western Australia until he was ten.  The family moved to Victoria, where he remained.  He ran a shop in Jeparit before his death in the Horsham Base Hospital.

Agnes Sarah COOK: Died 18 January 1942 at Casterton. This obituary begins “Born in a small house on the banks of the  Glenelg River at Casterton seventy-nine years ago…”.  Agnes was a lady that like the past and the future, knowledgeable about the history of Casterton, she also liked to predict the future.  Agnes married  Robert SYLVESTER and they had four children.

Helen GULL: Died 18 January 1942 at Casterton. Helen was born on the ship Helen during her parents’ voyage to Australia in 1852.  The GULL family became respected pioneers throughout the Western District.  Helen married Frederick PERRY in 1876 and they resided at well known Western District properties, Rifle Downs at Digby and Runnymeade at Sandford.  Frederick later ran the Digby Hotel.