Passing of the Pioneers

This edition of Passing Pioneers includes two months of obituaries, September and October. The photos I have posted at the Western District Families Facebook page have become a useful tool for finding obituaries.  Recent photos of Western District hotels have helped me find a number of obituaries of publicans past and there are four this edition.  During Family History Month in August,  I posted a photo of the Kent family of Casterton on the Facebook page and below you’ll find the obituary of one of the family members.  There is “feature” obituary for each month, with both subjects making significant contributions to their associated towns.  As usual, if you click on any underlined text, you’ll go to further information about the subject.

SEPTEMBER

BEGG, Thomas – Died 3 September 1895 at Branxholme.  Thomas Begg was born at Cumberland, Scotland around 1819.  He married Mary Reid in 1842 and they had three children.  In February 1855, the family left Liverpool onboard the Nashwauk bond for Adelaide, South Australia.  With them were around 300 other immigrants and 130 Irish Orphan girls. On day eighty-nine of the voyage, they reached Gulf St Vincent near Adelaide.  As the ship headed toward the mouth of the Onkaparinga River south of Adelaide, it hit the shoreline. Fortunately, the passengers were rescued and taken to nearby Noarlunga.  Everything the Beggs owned was lost but at least they survived. They travelled by land to Adelaide, where Thomas bid farewell to his family and left for the Bendigo diggings.

After fifteen months in Victoria with no luck, Thomas returned to Adelaide and took a job at a flour mill.  He was suffering from poor health and after doctor’s advice to move to the country they headed for the south-east of South Australia. The family remained there until around 1865 when Thomas selected land at Condah. He named his property Foutus. Thomas was a councillor for the Portland Shire from 1875 and Shire President from 1877 until his resignation in 1880.  He and Mary remained at Condah until the early 1890s when they moved to Branxholme.  In June 1892, Thomas and Mary celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary at the Branxholme Mechanics Institute with 150 guests in attendance.  William died in 1895 after a long illness and buried at the Branxholme Cemetery.  The funeral cortege on 6 September was one of the longest seen in the district and the coffin was almost totally covered with wreaths.  Mary died in 1912 at the age of ninety-two.

MELVILLE, William – Died 7 September 1897 at Byaduk.  William Melville was born in Sutherland, Scotland around 1829.  He arrived in Victoria in 1852 and went into partnership with William Bayles forming Bayles and Melville in Melbourne. In 1858, William married Ann McDonald.  The following year Ann gave birth to a son, William Henry but she died as a result of the birth, aged twenty-four.

“Advertising” The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954) 27 August 1859: 4. Web. 5 Sep 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154826326&gt;.

Meanwhile, business was good for Bayles and Melville and they expanded their interests into grazing land taking up Weerangourt south of Byaduk. On 18 April 1867, William remarried to Annette Margaret Bayles, a daughter of William Bayles and they settled at Weerangourt.  The partnership of Bayles and Melville was eventually dissolved but William continued on at Weerangourt.  In 1893, a new homestead was built.  William was also a Justice of the Peace. At the time of his death, William left his widow Annette and five sons and two daughters.  He was buried at the Hamilton (Old) Cemetery.

GRAVE OF WILLIAM MELVILLE AT HAMILTON (OLD) CEMETERY

JACOBY, Sigismund – Died 15 September 1917 at St Kilda.

“OUR ST. KILDA LEGISLATORS.” The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889 – 1930) 7 September 1889: 3. Web. 9 Sep 2018.

Sigismund Jacoby was born in Toruá, Prussia (now Poland) in 1837, the eldest of Salomon and Rosalie Jacoby’s seven children. Salomon was a soft goods merchant in Toruá.  Sigismund arrived in Australia around 1860 but left soon after for New Zealand where he worked in the retail trade.  He returned to Australia in January 1866 and by the end of April 1866 had opened a store “Albion House” in Gray Street next to the Bank of Victoria.

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser (South Melbourne, Vic. : 1860 – 1870) 28 April 1866: 3. Web. 14 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194470438&gt;.

By June 1866, Sigismund was on a committee investigating the viability of Hamilton having a fire brigade.  He was able to offer knowledge gained while in New Zealand.  By mid-March 1867, he was sitting on the Hamilton Borough Council. Also in 1867, Sigismund went into partnership with Isidore Rehfisch. The partnership was dissolved in 1868 and Sigismund once again traded alone.  In 1869, he partnered with Henry Horwitz of Horwitz & Co, a rival draper in the town. Sigismund moved to the corner of Gray and Thompson Streets and “Albion House” was let.

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 13 April 1870: 1. Web. 11 Sep 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196302868&gt;.

On 4 August 1869 at the synagogue in Bourke Street West, Melbourne (below), Sigismund married Hannah Horwitz, a talented pianist and a daughter of Henry Horwitz.  They had four children, three boys and one girl, all born in Hamilton from 1870 to 1876.

THE JEWISH SYNAGOGUE, BOURKE STREET WEST, MELBOURNE. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/236507

On 16 August 1875, Sigismund was elected as Mayor of the Borough of Hamilton.  An inaugural Mayoral dinner was held at the Victoria Hotel on the same day Sigismund was appointed as a Chief Magistrate. He held the Mayoral role until the following August when Councillor Stapylton Bree became Mayor.  Sigismund remained on the council and also sat on the Hamilton Hospital committee and was a founder and director of the Hamilton Gas Company. He believed as a resident, it was his duty to help improve the town.

After the first Hamilton Post Office was demolished in 1876, Sigismund purchased the bluestone to build St Ronans off Pope Street, Hamilton.  The home was of a similar design to the former post office.

ST RONANS, HAMILTON. The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 2 May 1903 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138684187

ST RONANS, HAMILTON

By 1878, Sigismund’s youngest sibling Max had arrived in Hamilton and it was in that year both were naturalised.  The following year, Sigismund travelled to Europe with Hannah as a British subject.  To farewell him, a banquet was held on 3 April 1879, held in the Hamilton Town Hall.  Max took over the running of the store while he was away.

“ITEMS OF NEWS.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 5 August 1880: 2. Web. 15 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225488522&gt;.

In June 1881, Sigismund purchased The Wholesale Clothing Company consisting of five stores and factory in the Melbourne CBD, Fitzroy, Emerald Hill, West Melbourne, Prahran, and Carlton, the location of the head office.  The Bourke Street store was part of the Eastern Market (below).

EASTERN MARKET, BOURKE STREET, MELBOURNE. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/41594

In 1884, moved on from the Wholesale Clothing Company when he purchased the Monster Clothing Company at 21 Bourke Street, Melbourne. The Hamilton Spectator shared the news.

“Items of News.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 24 June 1884: 2. Web. 15 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226048664&gt;.

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 6 March 1886: 6. Web. 17 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225773930&gt;.

Although he had left the town, Sigismund still took an interest in Hamilton affairs.  In 1883, he joined a deputation from the Dundas Railway League who met with the Minister of Railways to present a case for a railway line between Hamilton and Ararat.  In 1888, Sigismund left the rag trade and became a hotelier, taking over the Esplanade Hotel at St Kilda which he operated until 1897.

ESPLANADE HOTEL, ST KILDA 1891. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/54610

In 1897, Sigismund purchased the Port Phillip Club Hotel at 232 Flinders Street, Melbourne across the road from the Flinders Street Railway Station and a few doors away from Young and Jacksons Hotel.  

PORT PHILLIP CLUB HOTEL, FLINDERS STREET, MELBOURNE. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/41779

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 16 November 1897: 1. Web. 20 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226100390&gt;.

A good description of the hotel when Sigismund purchased it is available on the link to Melbourne Punch of 2 September 1897 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article174627105.  Twelve months later, Table Talk published an article on the success of the hotel under Sigismund’s management and the improvements he’d made.  You can read the article on the link http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145862760

Sigismund was a member of the St Kilda council from 1888 until 1914, serving as Mayor four times during that period. The Jacoby Reserve in Cowderoy Street, St Kilda West is named after Sigismund.  He was also one of the original members of the Melbourne Board of Works and he sat on the committee of the Alfred Hospital. At the time of his death, Sigismund left his widow. Hannah and three sons. Hannah died in 1935. Sigismund and Hannah are buried together in the St Kilda Cemetery.

Further information about Sigismund and his involvement with the St Kilda Council is on the link – https://heritage.portphillip.vic.gov.au/People_places/People_of_the_past/Councillor_Sigismund_Jacoby_JP

KENT, Michael – Died 21 September 1918 at Casterton.  Michael Joseph Kent was born in Thomastown, Kilkenny, Ireland and arrived in Victoria with his parents and siblings as a child.  The family lived at Portland and that is where Michael reunited with Norah Nell O’Brien, a girl he went to school with back in Kilkenny.  They married and moved to Casterton. Michael did labouring work with the Glenelg Shire, either employed directly by the shire or with shire employed contractors.  The Kents lived at Tara (below) and had seven children.  Two children died as babies.

TARA, CASTERTON, THE HOME OF THE KENT FAMILY c1890. Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/769213

During winter 1918, Michael Kent was working as a “day man” for the shire. His work as a labourer meant he was out in the wet weather and as a result, he contracted pneumonia and died ten days later.  He was sixty-three.  Nora died in 1941 aged eighty-eight.

McKELLAR, Rachel – Died 2 September 1926 at Malvern.  Rachel was born at Kilmichael, Scotland around 1836.  She travelled to Australia with her parents John McKellar and Rachel Harkness and siblings when she was fourteen. They settled at Knebsworth near Condah where Rachel’s brothers had already settled. On 3 July 1866, Rachel married Thomas Skene of Warrambeech near Hamilton.  Three years later, Thomas purchased Krongurt in South Australia and they moved there. Thomas died in 1884 and Rachel remained at Krongurt until 1902 when she went to live with her daughter in Melbourne.  She left three sons and five daughters and nine grandchildren.

CAVE, Elizabeth – Died 26 September 1944 at Cobden.  Elizabeth Cave was born in the Chatsworth district around 1860.  Known as Lizzie, she met Harry Quiney of Mortlake and they married at Harry’s parent’s home at Mortlake on 10 April 1884.  Harry held the licence of Mac’s Hotel in Mortlake and in 1885, Lizzie gave birth to her first child at the hotel.  In 1909, the Quiney’s built a new hotel on the same site (below).

MAC’S HOTEL, MORTLAKE c1930. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/60755

During the war years, Elizabeth was a member of the Mortlake branch of the Red Cross and acted as secretary. Harry Quiney died in 1920 and Elizabeth continued to run Mac’s Hotel until 1927 when she sold.  She then moved to Cobden to run the Grand Central Hotel (below).

GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL, COBDEN c1920 Image courtesy of the Museums Victoria Collections https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/772415

In 1931, Elizabeth left Cobden for a holiday in Tasmania intending to take up another business on her return.  Elizabeth spent some time away from Cobden but was settled back there by the mid-1930s.

October

HAFERKORN, Charles Ehryott– Died 10 October 1884 at Hamilton. Charles Haferkorn arrived in Victoria around 1850.  He spent time in Melbourne before establishing a brewery and aerated water factory in Gray Street, Hamilton in 1858.

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator and Grange District Advertiser (South Melbourne, Vic. : 1860 – 1870) 12 April 1862: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194859878

In 1860, Charles married Frances “Fanny” Featherby of Croxton East. In 1873, Charles and family went to Balmoral when Charles took up the licence of the Western Hotel but the following year he suffered spinal injuries in a coach accident resulting in paralysis. He continued with the hotel with the help of Fanny.  After six years, the Haferkorns moved on to the Coleraine Hotel.  In 1883, they returned to Hamilton and Charles had the Grange Family Hotel built on the site of his former brewery in Gray Street, Hamilton.  Charles died at the hotel in 1884.  Fanny married Samuel Fogg in 1886 and they continued to run the Grange Family Hotel (below).  The Grange Family Hotel in time became the George Hotel.

GRANGE FAMILY HOTEL, GRAY STREET, HAMILTON. Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 17 April 1888: 1 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR). 

MARKS, Mark – Died 12 October 1892 at Colac West.  Mark Marks was born around 1833.  He settled in Colac and in 1857 he married Sarah Ann Owen and they went on to have eleven children over the next twenty-three years.  Mark operated three hotels in Colac, the Perseverance and Oddfellows Hotels during the 1870s and the Union Club Hotel from 1880 until the mid-1880s.

MURRAY STREET, COLAC LOOKING TOWARD THE UNION CLUB HOTEL ON THE CNR OF GELLIBRAND STREET c1913. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90333175

In 1886, Mark took over the Terang Hotel.  Mark and Sarah returned to Colac in 1891 taking up residence at Laurel Banks estate, Colac West.   Mark was a Colac Shire councillor, a supporter of St Johns Church, Colac and one of the oldest members of the Loyal Colac Lodge.  Mark was fifty-nine at the time of his death. Sarah died in 1907 aged seventy leaving seven sons and two daughters.

BROWN, William Clarke – Died 28 October 1908 at Coleraine.  William Brown was born at Thornbury House, Northampton, England in 1824 and arrived in Victoria in 1844.  He met Margaret Sefton who arrived in 1841 from Ireland, in Melbourne and they married at St James Church Melbourne in 1846.  They went to Heywood and William worked for Mr Bilston’s property before they settled at Dundas Vale, Bil-Bil-Wyt.  William claimed he was the first man to drive a cab in Melbourne and Hamilton. 

William and Margaret celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary on 6 February 1906.  Their thirteen children, eighty-one grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren joined them. James Meek, a photographer from Hamilton took photos at the anniversary celebrations.

“THE FAMILY OF WILLIAM AND MARGARET BROWN .” Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 – 1954) 7 April 1906: 12. Web. 13 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221220108&gt;.

By that time, William was living with his son where he died in 1908.  Margaret died in 1915.

WALSH, Margaret – Died 1 October 1918 at Grassdale.  Margaret Walsh was born in Cork, Ireland in 1817 and arrived in Tasmania in 1841. She met Samuel Evans Young who she married and they left for Portland.  They settled at Tahara and Samuel farmed and during the 1870s, he operated the Tahara store.

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 26 February 1878: 3. Web. 15 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226069628&gt;.

Margaret and Samuel remained at Tahara until Samuel’s death in July 1907.  The Age reported on Samuel’s death at the age of eighty-four and mentioned his wife was 100 years old.

“HAMILTON.” The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954) 22 July 1907: 6. Web. 13 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198611068&gt;.

However, Margaret lived for another eleven years but wasn’t 111 when she died, rather 101.  She spent those eleven years living with her son at Grassdale. Margaret lived through the reign of six British sovereigns.

MANIFOLD, James Chester – Died 30 October 1918 at Sea.

JAMES CHESTER MANIFOLD. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria

James Manifold was born at Purrumbete estate (below) in 1867, the fourth son of John Manifold and Marion Thomson.  He was educated at Geelong Grammar School.

PURRUMBETE, ON THE BANKS OF LAKE PURRUMBETTE c1913 Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/75086

After the death of their father John in 1877, Purrumbete was divided between the four Manifold brothers. Chester’s share was “Talindert“.

TALINDERT, CAMPERDOWN. The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982) 6 April 1940: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51271786

In 1890, James was elected to the Hampden Shire Council and would go on to serve as President.  The following year, he married Lillian Eva Curle on 11 March 1891 at St Paul’s Church, Camperdown.  James was involved with football and cricket and his in younger years, was one of the best sportsmen in the state. With his brothers William and Edward, he represented Victoria in polo (below).

“INTERCOLONIAL POLO MATCH.” Melbourne Punch (Vic. : 1855 – 1900) 18 May 1899: 21. Web. 16 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180224372&gt;

James was also interested in racing as an owner and breeder. One of his successes, with his brother Edward, was the 1896 Victorian Racing Club Grand National Steeplechase with Dungan (below) considered Australia’s greatest steeplechaser at the time  Dungan was killed less than two weeks later in a race fall at Moonee Valley on 25 July 1896.

“GRAND NATIONAL STEEPLECHASE WINNER.” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 18 July 1896: 24. Web. 16 Oct 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139728388&gt;.

With the approach of Federation in 1901, James ran for the seat of Corangamite.  He was successful and was a member of the first Commonwealth parliament in 1901 but resigned in 1903.  He decided to run again for the Federal seat of Corangamite in 1913 and defeated sitting member James Scullin.

During WW1, James gave 3000 acres of land for returned soldiers and donated thousands of pounds for soldiers’ repatriation. His only son, Thomas Chester Manifold served with the Royal Field Artillery with the British Army. James travelled to England in 1917 for government and private business and in 1918 left Sydney for a trip to San Francisco.  It was on that voyage he developed pneumonia and died on 30 October. He was buried at sea.  James left his widow, Lillian and Thomas Chester. and a daughter.

As a result of his death, a by-election was held in the seat of Corangamite and James Scullin returned as the member.  Scullin went on to become Prime Minister of Australia from 1929 until 1932.  At a local level, James and his brothers were great benefactors to Camperdown.  A statue to honour James (below), located in Manifold Street, Camperdown, was unveiled in 1921.

JAMES CHESTER MANIFOLD STATUE, MANIFOLD STREET, CASTERTON. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/365691

MANIFOLD, William Thomas – Died 20 October 1922 at Camperdown.  William Manifold was born in 1861 at Purrumbete estate, the eldest son of John Manifold and Marion Thomson.  On 6 August 1886, William married Alice Mary Cridland at St Mary’s Church, Papanui in Christchurch, New Zealand.  The couple settled at the family station of Gnarpurt, Lismore for a time after their marriage. William and Alice eventually moved back to Purrumbete. (below) The station became known for its dairy herds.

PURRUMBETE HOMESTEAD. Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/217424

William was a champion polo player and teamed up with his brothers James and Edward to compete for Victoria.  He was a supporter of the Church of England and Vicar’s warden of St Paul’s Church, Camperdown. He donated money to Geelong and Ballarat Grammar Schools and served as a Hampden Shire councillor.  During WW1, William and Alice’s son Lieutenant William Herbert Manifold was killed on 28 April 1917 in France while with the Royal Field Artillery aged twenty-seven.  Just over three years to the day after William Jr’s death, Alice died at the age of fifty-four.

On 20 October 1922, William MacKinnon of Marida Yallock, visited William at Purrumbete.  They were driving nearby when the car became bogged.  While trying to free the car, William had a heart attack, collapsed and died.  He was sixty and left two sons and two daughters.  William and his brothers contributed much to Camperdown and the clock tower they donated to the town in memory of their brother Thomas Peter Manifold who died in 1895 stands today as a reminder of that contribution.

CAMPERDOWN CLOCK TOWER, MANIFOLD STREET, CAMPERDOWN Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64881

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