Passing of the Pioneers

In the post A Box of Chocolates, I explained writing stories of Western District pioneers and Hamilton’s WW1 servicemen is like lifting the lid on a box of chocolates…I never know what I’m going to get.  Writing this month’s Passing of the Pioneers was like dipping into a double layer box of chocolates. I’ve read many editions of the Hamilton Spectator and histories of Hamilton, so I knew of Angelo Palmer, a prominent solicitor in the town, but I’d never delved into Angelo’s life.  When I read his obituary for this post, I got two surprises.  Firstly he was a passenger on a clipper shipwrecked off Victoria’s south-west coast of interest to me because the clipper’s colourful captain also steered my ggg grandparents Charles and Agnes Hadden to Australia aboard the Marco Polo.  Secondly, there was something “magical” about Angelo but you’ll have to read on.

Other pioneers in this edition, combining August and September obituaries, include a Hamilton chemist described as the “poor man’s friend” and from the Darlington district, a man, his son and his son’s wife.  Click on any underlined text throughout the post for further information.

McARTHUR, Peter – Died 3 July 1897 at Camperdown.  Peter McArthur was born to well-off farmers on the island of Islay, off Scotland’s west coast, around 1817.  As a lad, he joined a ship’s crew and left home for a couple of years before returning to his father’s farm.  But in 1836 at the age of nineteen, he was off again with Sydney, Australia was his destination.  By 1839, he had moved south to Melbourne, meeting up with a man who would also become one of the Western District’s notable pioneer, Nicholas Cole.  They met Frenchman Jean Duvarney and the three men made their way to Geelong, buying a flock of sheep from the Manifold brothers. With their sheep, the three men headed further west and took up land near Darlington.

Duvarney left the partnership going on to build the Duverney Inn, later known as the Frenchman’s Inn, at the junction of the busy roads from Melbourne and Geelong to Port Fairy and Portland. In 1852 at that place, the township of Cressy was gazetted, named after Duverney’s hometown Crecy in France.

Around 1850, Peter and Nicolas Cole split their station and Peter named his share  Meningoort and Cole, West Cloven Hills.  In 1855, Peter married Margaret McLean about eighteen years his junior and they went on to have ten children. Margaret is pictured below with two of the couple’s sons.

MARGARET McARTHUR AND TWO OF HER SONS c1865-1870 Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/235430

Peter was one of the first Magistrates in the area, a member of the district’s first Roads Board and a Hampden Shire Councillor. He was also a member of the Leura Lodge of Freemasons. Peter’s wife Margaret died on 23 March 1883 at the age of forty-eight after a long illness.  Peter survived Margaret by fourteen years, dying in 1897 at the age of eighty. He was buried at Camperdown Cemetery.

In 1941, The Australasian included Meningoort in their Famous Pastoral Properties series and you can read the article including more on Peter McArthur on the following link – The  Australasian.   The McArthur and Cole families remained on the properties Meningoort and West Cloven Hills and in 2013, the Warrnambool Standard published an article about the two families still there over 170 years after their forebears arrived.  That article is on the following link – Warrnambool Standard.

ROUNTREE, James Hughes – Died August 1902 at Hamilton.  James Rountree was born around 1847 in Ireland, a son of an Irish Protestant father and a Welsh mother.  He arrived in Victoria aboard the Great Britain in 1864 and worked as a dispenser at the Geelong hospital.  In 1874, he became superintendent of the Hamilton Hospital.  Fifteen years later, James opened a chemist  in Hamilton’s Gray Street.

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 3 September 1889: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225760959&gt;.

James was a man who “abhorred idleness”, never taking a holiday and going about everything he did with great energy.  His commitment to his work meant he had little or no family life. Described as an unselfish and generous man, James often gave free advice to the less wealthy in the town, saving them a visit to a doctor.  James became known as the “poor man’s friend”.  

In 1875, James married Margaret Strang Kitchen and they went on to have eight children.  Most of James and Margaret’s children followed James’ profession.  Daughters Mary, Margaret, Jean, and Ella were chemists as was son James.  Mary Rountree married the well-known jockey Bobby Lewis in 1920.  Lewis rode four Melbourne Cup winners during his career and controversially rode Phar Lap to third in the cup in 1929.  Another daughter Evangeline served as a nurse during WW1.

James’ strict work ethic appears to have claimed his life.  He died at the Hamilton Hospital aged fifty-five.  James was a member of the Masonic and Orange Lodges and thirty members of the Masonic Lodge led his funeral procession and the hearse was followed by twenty-one members of the Orange Lodge.  James did not approve of flowers at funerals so predictably, flowers were not present at his own funeral by request of the family.

GRAVE OF JAMES HUGH ROUNTREE AND FAMILY, HAMILTON OLD CEMETERY

You can see the memorial window dedicated to James Rountree and his wife Margaret at the Hamilton Christ Church on the following link – Sacred Memorials

PALMER, Angelo Crotch – Died August 1912 at Hamilton. Angelo Palmer was born in Faversham, Kent in 1832 and grew up in Canterbury where his father was a professor of music.  Angelo and his brother William Henry attended boarding school from a young age.  William inherited his father’s musical talent while Angelo was expected to join the legal profession.  After his schooling, Angelo was articled to solicitors in London but with the discovery of gold in Victoria, he decided to leave England and seek his fortune. In 1852 at the age of twenty, he sailed aboard the South Sea, arriving in Victoria in February 1853.  Angelo set off to Castlemaine but within months was back in Melbourne in search of work, finding a labouring job with a builder.

Just as Angelo left England in 1852 so too his brother. William Palmer had gone on to study at the Royal Academy of Music in London but left his studies behind around 1851 after he saw a performance by French magician Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin.  Taking up magic, William changed his name to Robert Heller and travelled to the United States in 1852 where his career took off.   

ROBERT HELLER . Image courtesy of the W. G. Alma conjuring collection. Photographs. State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/342043

With the death of his father in mid-1854, Angelo returned to England. Within a year, he booked his return passage to Australia aboard a clipper on her maiden voyage. On 6 October 1855, the Schomberg (below) left Liverpool captained by James Nicol ‘Bully’ Forbes and with cargo and 430 passengers, including Angelo. The Schomberg was one of the largest and finest clippers built and Forbes was out to break a record of the fastest trip to Victoria, something he had done with the Marco Polo in 1852. His target was sixty days his target. On Boxing Day 1855, the clipper ran aground on a sandbar near Curdies Inlet at Peterborough, Victoria. Fortunately, a passing steamer the SS Queen rescued all passengers and transported them through to Melbourne. There was an investigation into the wreck and while Captain Forbes was acquitted but his reputation was ruined. The Schomberg eventually sunk off the coast.

THE CLIPPER, SCHOMBERG. Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia. Image no, PRG 1373/19/38 http://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/PRG+1373/19/38

Back in Melbourne, Angelo decided to return to law, qualifying as a solicitor in 1859.  In 1860, he married Katherine Walker and a child, Fanny Dolby was born in 1861 at South Yarra. Another daughter was born in 1862 in Melbourne. In the same year, Angelo and family arrived in Hamilton and Angelo went into partnership with Henry Cox. Angelo and Kate’s first son, Saxon Harold, was born in 1864, but in 1866, their eldest daughter Fanny died.  In 1873, the couple lost another daughter, one-year-old Hilda Victoria. By 1869, Angelo was working alone and his services highly sought after. He acted as solicitor for the Shires of Mount Rouse and Dundas and the Borough of Hamilton. He was also one of the original directors of Alexandra College and the Hamilton and Western District College.

From 1869 to 1871, William Palmer as Robert Heller toured Australia and has been credited as the first person to perform a Punch and Judy show in Australia. Music wasn’t totally lost from his life as Robert played piano during his performances and his talent duly noted.  Robert performed in Melbourne, Geelong, Ballarat, and even Smythesdale. It appears that’s as close as he went to Hamilton.

“NEWS AND NOTES.” The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 – 1924) 2 April 1870: 2. Web. 17 Sep 2017 .

The Hamilton Spectator reported on Robert Heller from time to time but never mentioned his connection to Angelo Palmer. It was not until after the death of Robert Heller in Philadelphia in 1878, various papers made the connection, but not the Hamilton Spectator.  William left a large estate and after various beneficiaries received a share, Angelo received the balance. 

“ITEMS OF GENERAL NEWS.” The Telegraph, St Kilda, Prahran and South Yarra Guardian (Vic. : 1866 – 1888) 1 February 1879: 3. Web. 15 Sep 2017 .

The Hamilton Spectator came close to mentioning Angelo’s magician brother in the early 1890s. A magician was touring the colonies claiming he was a nephew of Robert Heller. The Spec reported on the magician’s prophecy for the upcoming for the Melbourne Cup and stated “At any rate, the brother of the late Robert Heller knows of no such nephew”

“SPORTING ECHOES.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 9 August 1892: 4. Web. 15 Sep 2017 .

Melbourne Punch responded and didn’t worry about naming names, even referring to Angelo as “Mr. Hamilton”.

“THEATRICAL GOSSIP.” Melbourne Punch (Vic. : 1855 – 1900) 18 August 1892: 7. Web. 17 Sep 2017 .

In 1907, Kate died at the age of sixty-six. Angelo continued living at the family home in Skene Street and was eighty when he died in 1912. He was buried at the Hamilton Old Cemetery (below) with Kate and beside his young daughters. 

GRAVE OF ANGELO PALMER AND FAMILY, HAMILTON OLD CEMETERY.

It wasn’t until after Angelo’s death, the Hamilton Spectator spoke of the unspoken.

“DEATH OF MR. A.C. PALMER” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 12 August 1912: 3. Web. 15 Sep 2017 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225284343&gt;.

I have only given a broad description of William Palmer/Robert Heller’s life,  but if you would like to find out more, the following sites will give you an idea of how big Robert Heller was in the world of magic and the influence he had on future magicians including Harry Houdini.

The Cemetery Traveller includes photos of Robert Heller’s grave including a photo of Harry Houdini paying his respect.  

The Magic Detective has written twenty-seven posts about Robert Heller and for a trip back into the world of 19th-century theatre, they are well worth reading. You can find the posts on the following link – Robert Heller

Punch and Judy in 19th Century America: A History and Biographical Dictionary by Ryan Howard discusses Heller and his Punch and Judy connection.  You’ll find that on the following link to Google books – Punch and Judy   

Strong on Music: The New York Music Scene in the Days of George Templeton by Vera Brodsky Lawrence has a reference to Robert’s early days in the United States.  You can read more on the following link to Google books – Heller on Broadway

McARTHUR,  Robert Ernest – Died 29 August 1929 at Terang.  Robert McArthur was born in 1867, a son of Peter McArthur (see obituary above) and Margaret McLean. He attended school at Geelong College before studying law at Melbourne University. Qualified as a solicitor, Robert returned to Menengoort to help his father with the property.  Robert had a great love of horses and was an amateur rider in cross-country events across the Western District, mostly for the Manifold brothers.  In 1897 and 1898, Robert won three races in each year at Warrnambool’s Amateur races. He also had success at the Oaklands and Melbourne Hunt Clubs and participated in polo matches.  In later years, Robert joined the committee of the Camperdown Turf Club and was an honourary starter for the Terang Racing Club and sat on the first board of the Western District Racing Association.

ROBERT McARTHUR (on right) -“CUP MEETING OF TERANG RACING CLUB, NEW YEAR’S DAY, 1921.” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 8 January 1921: 41. Web. 15 Sep 2017 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article140252424&gt;.

Robert was also a Hampden Shire councilor from 1897 to 1907.  In December 1898, Robert married Alice Edith Kirkpatrick. In his later years, Robert went to live at Koort-Koort-Nong Station.

KOORT KOORT NONG STATION 1984 Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/217275

Robert McArthur was buried at the Camperdown Cemetery.

GRANT, John Scott – Died 13 September 1879 at Sandford.  John Scott Grant was born in Scotland around 1822. He married Ann Kilpatrick and they left for Victoria arriving in 1841 aboard the Grindlay. With a man named William Murray, John and Ann made their way west.  They first found work at the property of the Whyte brothers near Coleraine before John and Ann moved to Henty’s Merino Downs. John then took up a run near Penola, South Australia but by the early 1850s the lure of gold was too great and he headed to the diggings.  It’s not known how his luck went, but after leaving the diggings, John sold his Penola property and bought the Woodford Inn at Dartmoor.  He stayed there for around three years before purchasing land at Sandford in 1856 where he remained.  John built and operated the Caledonian Hotel at Sandford from 1857.

“Advertising” Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1843; 1854 – 1876) 19 June 1857: 3 (EVENING). Web. 15 Sep 2017 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64568717&gt;.

John’s obituary states he also built a two-story house at Sandford, described as a”…rather pretentious building for those times”.  It apparently later burnt down and another house was built.  John was a member of the Ancient Order of Foresters.  After John’s death, Ann continued on at the Caledonian Hotel until her death in March 1903.

ANDREWS, Catherine Forbes – Died September 1901 at Hamilton. Catherine Andrews was born around 1834 and arrived in Australia in 1854 with her husband John Stewart. They settled at Naracoorte, remaining there for around ten years before John bought Bochara around 1865 and in 1868, the properties Inverary and Louth. The Stewarts lived at Inverary (below) near Branxholme, but when John died in 1882, Catherine moved to Hamilton where she remained until her death.

INVERARY, BRANXHOLME 1978. Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria. http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/215500

STANSMORE, Harry George – Died 2 September 1916 at Camperdown.  Harry Stansmore was born at Terang in 1857 and went to live in Camperdown as a child. He operated a livery business in Camperdown and acted as manager of the Manifold families’ thoroughbreds.  His involvement with the Manifolds saw Harry connected to wins in the Grand National Steeplechase and Australian Hurdle, among others.  About 1911, Harry went into the stock and station agent business.  Harry was involved with the Heytesbury P&A Society and was a well-known judge at shows including the Royal Melbourne Show.  He was a member of the Camperdown Turf Club and Camperdown Polo Club.  Harry married Elizabeth Cohen in 1888 and they had two sons and a daughter

DAVEY, Edith – Died September 1939 at Cobden.  Edith Davey was born at Port Fairy in 1861.  Her parents moved to the Port Campbell district and that’s where Edith remained for the duration of her life.  The Davey property was Edgecombe on the Great Ocean Road, just east of the Loch Ard Gorge. During August 1910, Edith’s sister Annie drowned in the property’s dam at the age of forty-seven and the following year her father died at the age of ninety and in 1915, her mother died aged eighty.  Edith remained alone at the property for the next twenty-four years.  Her obituary in the Camperdown Chronicle described Edith as one of the “grand pioneer women of Australia”.

“MISS EDITH DAVEY” Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954) 26 September 1939: 5. Web. 14 Sep 2017 .

KIRKPATRICK, Alice Edith – Died 22 September 1952 at Melbourne.  Alice Kirkpatrick was born at the Beemery Station near Bourke, N.S.W. in 1870.  In 1898, Alice married Robert McArthur (see obituary above) and she moved to Victoria to live at Koort-Koort-Nong Station near Camperdown.  Like her husband, Alice took an interest in racing and was a life member of the Terang Racing Club and Camperdown Turf Club.  During WW1 she was secretary of the Camperdown Red Cross.  Alice was also secretary of the Camperdown Golf Club Associates. In 1928, Alice and Robert went to live near Princetown but he died the following year.  Alice remained at Princetown until around 1945 when she moved to Melbourne remaining there until her death.

© 2017 Merron Riddiford

 

Passing of the Pioneers

It’s a bumper Passing of the Pioneers for December with twenty-five new pioneer obituaries from across the Western District.  Christmas is a particularly sad time to lose a loved one and this month there are five pioneers who passed away on Christmas Day.  Two of those were at Casterton on Christmas Day 1917.  As with most months, there are those with something in common. This month, sons or grandsons at war was a common theme.  Remember to click on any underlined words to find further information about a subject.

David Wright BRAYSHAY – Died 16 December 1888 at St Kilda.  David Brayshay and his wife Maria Scott arrived in Buninyong near Ballarat around the time the Union Jack Lead near Warrenheip Street opened in 1857. He opened a drapery with a Mr O’Donnell almost opposite the Robert Burns Hotel in Warrenheip Street.  They then built a brick shop near the centre of the township. When the partnership dissolved, David remained in the brick shop and expanded into groceries. During his time in the town, he was a Buninyong Councillor from 1863 until 1869.

Things turned awry in 1869 when the Ballarat Star reported David’s insolvency and an order of compulsory sequestration. His insolvency case continued in the courts into 1870 and it was not long after David and his family arrived in Hamilton.  David purchased a large amount of land near Buckley’s Swamp and took over the running of Hamilton’s Victoria Hotel.

"Advertising" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 9 November 1870: 1. Web. 25 Nov 2016 .

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 9 November 1870: 1. Web. 25 Nov 2016 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196302997&gt;..

1930 Museum Victoria Collections http://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/766568

THE VICTORIA HOTEL, HAMILTON, 1930. image courtesy of the Museum Victoria Collections http://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/766568

David was again drawn to public life serving as a Hamilton Councillor and  Mayor. On 14 February 1884, the Hamilton Spectator reported David wanted to let 1000 acres of land, reclaimed from Buckley Swamp, for farming purposes.  David’s contribution to reclaiming the swamp was remembered in his obituary in the Hamilton Spectator.

"OBITUARY." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 18 December 1888: .

“OBITUARY.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 18 December 1888: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225762827&gt;.

During December 1888, Hamilton agents Robert Stapylton Bree & Co. advertised the sale of David’s land at Buckley’s Swamp because he was leaving the district.  The following advertisement appeared in the Hamilton Spectator on 13 December 1888 for the auction on the following Saturday.

"Advertising" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 13 December 1888: .

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 13 December 1888: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225759630&gt;.

The sale was then postponed because David, staying at The Esplanade Hotel in St Kilda, fell ill and died the day after the scheduled sale.  He left his widow Maria, one son and seven daughters. Maria died at Hamilton in 1902.

Ann SAVAGE – Died 4 December 1898 at Hamilton.  Ann Savage was born in Walkern, Hertfordshire, England around 1823.  She arrived in Victoria during the 1850s and in 1857 at Geelong married Mark William Hughes, widower and father of two sons.  The couple arrived at Strathkellar around 1859 and their first child Ellen was born at Hamilton that year. In 1862, a son Frederick Charles Hughes was born.  Mark set up a nursery business in Gray Street, Hamilton selling seeds and flowers and the family moved to Gray Street. In 1888, Ann and Mark’s son Frederick married my ggg aunt, Martha Harman, daughter of James Harman,  Mark Hughes died in March 1897 and Ann survived for less than two years after. Ann was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery.

John MacLENNAN – Died December 1908 at Mumbannar.  John MacLennan was born at Contin, Ross-Shire, Scotland around 1825 and arrived at Portland aboard the John Davis in 1853. With a good knowledge of sheep, John was employed by Henry Monro at Upper Crawford Station near Hotspur for six years then at Rifle Downs working for Richard Lewis.  In 1869, John took up land at Mumbannar where he was always willing to let the passing travelling public stop at his homestead.

Elizabeth KINSELLA –  Died 6 December 1914 at Hamilton.  Elizabeth Kinsella was born in Dublin, Ireland around 1828 and arrived at Geelong with her husband Richard Mullin during the mid-1850s. After living in Geelong for a couple of years, they moved to Portland and then Hamilton around the mid-1860s.  They lived in Cox Street and Richard worked as a carpenter. In her later years, Elizabeth was independent and had a great memory of all significant dates from her life.  Elizabeth left three daughters at the time of her death.

John LUCAS – Died 5 December 1915 at Macarthur.  John Lucas was born in Tasmania around 1841 and arrived with his parents in Victoria as a young boy.  He lived at Macarthur from the mid-1860s and he worked as a bootmaker.  He married Bridget Haley in 1863. Bridget died in 1903 at Macarthur.  John’s obituary indicates he had previously been married.  At the time of his death, John had five sons, three daughters, forty-four grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Helen LAIDLAW –  Died 18 December 1915 at Hamilton.  Helen Laidlaw was the second daughter of James Laidlaw and Mary Coates and was born at Learmonth on 24 September 1860.  In the 1870s Helen’s father purchased Lake Wallace Station near Edenhope. He was soon back in central Victoria, purchasing  Amphitheatre Station south of Avoca around 1880.  It was at Amphitheatre Station where Helen married John Fenton of Ararat in 1884.

"Family Notices" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 31 July 1884: 2. .

“Family Notices” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 31 July 1884: 2. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226046744&gt;.

The following year, Helen and John’s first child Gwendoline was born at Ararat. Soon after they arrived in Hamilton and Nellie was born there in 1887. John ran a stock and station agency in Gray Street, Hamilton and served as Mayor from 1904 to 1906.

On 21 June 1915, Helen and John’s eldest son John Wilfred Fenton enlisted, embarking on 18 November 1915. Around two weeks later, Helen fell ill and her condition deteriorated until her death on 18 December at the Fenton home Lantana in Gray Street aged just fifty-five.  On 19 June 1918 John Wilfred Fenton, by then a Military Medal recipient, died from the effects of gassing in France.  Helen was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery and a memorial to John Fenton Jr, appears on the headstone.

fenton-2

HEADSTONE OF HELEN FENTON, OLD HAMILTON CEMETERY.

William BROWN –  Died December 1915 at Branxholme.  William Brown was born around 1825 in Scotland and arrived in South Australia about 1850.  Three years later he married Maria Boyne, arriving in the Western District around 1863.  William worked at Muntham and Grassdale stations near Digby then owned by John Coldham.  By 1869, they were living at Branxholme where their daughter Agnes was born.  William worked as a contractor around the Branxholme district.  In February 1909. William lost a daughter and wife. First his daughter Mrs Rosina Joyce of Branxholme then just ten days later his wife Maria died.  Two of William and Maria’s grandsons, brothers Matthew and Thomas Joyce were both killed in France while serving in 1917.

Isabella IRVINE – Died 15 December 1916 at Mortlake. Isabella Irvine was born at Newcastle on Tyne around 1849 and arrived at Portland with her parents and three siblings in 1854 aboard the Indian Ocean.  In 1875, Isabella married Thomas Keogh and they spent their married life living in Mortlake. At the time of her death, Isabella had three sons and one daughter.  Two sisters were also still alive, Annie Boswell Irvine Small and Tomina Irvine Small both living in Mortlake and married to brothers Thomas and Charles Small.

Henry POTTER – Died 4 December 1916 at Hamilton.  Henry Potter was born around 1841 in Norfolk, England and arrived in Adelaide with his parents around 1854.  The family moved to Portland and Henry became an apprentice plasterer.  After his apprenticeship, Henry entered into a partnership with Thomas Wyatt lasting forty years. Henry married in 1861 to Catherine Stokes.  In 1870, Burns and Wyatt moved to Mount Gambier where they remained for five years completing several large jobs including the Mount Gambier Church of England.  By 1874, Henry and Thomas had moved their business to Hamilton and worked on the Alexandra Ladies College and the Hamilton and Western District College.  In his later years, Henry was a Clerk of Works for the Hamilton Borough Council on projects such as the Hamilton YMCA (below).  At the time of his death, Henry was the oldest living member of the Grange Lodge of Freemasons.

dscn0968

THE FORMER YMCA BUILDING IN HAMILTON.

Thomas McALLEN – Died 16 December 1916 at Port Fairy. Thomas McAllen was born around 1836 in County Clare, Ireland and left when he was twenty-seven with his wife Jane.  They arrived at Port Fairy and first lived at Yambuk then Tyrendarra.  Thomas retired to Port Fairy around 1910 and lived in Polding Street where Jane died in March 1915.  At the time of his death, Thomas had three sons and four daughters. Thomas was buried at the  Yambuk Cemetery.

Janet Manson CLARKE – Died 17 December 1916 at South Yarra.  Janet Clarke was born in Scotland around 1835 and on 23 August 1858 she married John Kennedy MacMillan a young Presbyterian minister.  With a demand for Presbyterian clergymen in Victoria, Janet and John left for Australia soon after their marriage and made their way to Beechworth where John was inducted as Reverend of the Beechworth Presbyterian Church.  In 1869, Reverend MacMillan was appointed to the St Andrews Presbyterian Church and remained there  for thirty-five years.

ST. ANDREW'S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH c1890.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/69513

ST. ANDREW’S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH c1890. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/69513

Janet was also active in the community and was a founding member of the Hamilton Ladies Benevolent Society.  In 1891, Janet travelled to the “old country” Scotland accompanied by one of her daughters.

"Items of News." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 12 November 1891: . .

“Items of News.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 12 November 1891: . <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226165639&gt;.

Reverend MacMillan died in February 1904 and Janet survived him a further twelve years.  When she died, Janet had three daughters and five sons.  She was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery.

Elizabeth BYRNE  – Died 12 December 1917 at Tellangatuk. Elizabeth was born in Liverpool, England and was married there in 1858 to Thomas Jasper.  They arrived at Port Fairy around 1864 on the Birkenhead. By then the couple had three young daughters. After spending some time in Port Fairy, they went to Mount Rouse then Dunkeld before settling at Tellangatuk around 1872. The couple had ten children. Thomas died on 7 May 1900.  Elizabeth and Thomas had a further nine children after their arrival in Victoria and when she died, Elizabeth had twenty-six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Bridget GHEOGHAN – Died 25 December 1917 at Casterton.  Bridget Gheoghan was born in England in 1839 and arrived in Australia in 1853  In 1870, Bridget married  Robert Pierce at Penola. Bridget and Robert lived at Mount Gambier for eighteen years before moving to Casterton around 1880.  At the time of her death, Bridget had one daughter and four sons, with her youngest son John serving in France.  John died of pneumonia in France on 17 November 1918, seven days after the Armistice.

Mary Clare TYNAN – Died 25 December 1917 at Casterton. Mary Tynan was born in Ireland around 1864 and arrived with her husband Richard Bolton in Victoria around 1885. They headed  to Casterton where Richard opened a barrister and solicitor practice.  Better known as Clare, Mary left one son and two daughters when she died during the evening of Christmas Day.  Her son Richard was away on active service at the time of her death and returned to Australia on 1 July 1919.  She was just fifty-four.  Richard Bolton died in April 1920.

William Henry ROSEVEAR – Died 27 December 1917 at Condah.  William Rosevear was born around 1848 and in 1869, he married Margaret Morrison. He was a bootmaker at Condah for forty years.  William enjoyed cricket and football and was a longtime goal umpire for the Condah football team.  He left his widow Margaret and four sons.

John GILL – Died 1 December 1918 at Koroit. John Gill was born at Galbally, Ireland about 1844.  He arrived in Melbourne around 1864 and headed straight to the Koroit district to join family members.  He was a carpenter by trade but turned to farming. In 1891, John married Margaret McGrath and they had three children.  John was buried at Tower Hill cemetery.

Catherine GRANT – Died 7 December 1918  at Digby. Catherine was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1839.  She arrived in Australia aboard the Lord Raglan in 1862 with her parents and they made their way to the Digby district.  Catherine’s was a tragic life.  In 1865, she married Thomas Finlay and they had a son Edward in 1867 but tragedy struck in December 1869 when Thomas died as the result of a fall from a hay wagon.

"COUNTRY NEWS." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 28 December 1869: .

“COUNTRY NEWS.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 28 December 1869: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5809360&gt;.

On 8 March 1880, Edward Finlay then fourteen was accidentally shot while he and a friend prepared for a hunting excursion.  Edward died a short time after.  Catherine lost the two closest to her in the space of eleven years.  She never remarried and continued living at Digby for the next thirty-eight years.  As she grew older, living alone became more difficult and on 15 December 1913 Catherine slipped while tending to her chickens and dislocated her shoulder. In February 1915, Catherine fell in her backyard and broke her elbow.  On 7 December 1918, Catherine died aged seventy-nine and a large cortege followed her remains to the Digby Cemetery two days later.

Charles Henry JOHNSTONE – Died December 1930 at Mortlake.  Charles Johnstone was born around 1843 and arrived in Victoria as a fourteen-year-old.  It wasn’t long before he was drawn to the goldfields and spent time at the Ballarat and Clunes diggings. Still keen to chase his fortune, Charles went to the goldfields of New Zealand but had no success. After his return, Charles selected in the Laang district west of Cobden. In 1871, he  married Louisa Molyneaux from Garvoc. Louisa died in 1923. At the time of his death, Charles had sixty-eight grandchildren and forty-five great-grandchildren.

John McLean GALLACHER – Died 1 December 1933 at Hamilton.  John Gallacher was born around 1867 at Redruth on the Wannon River.  As a young man, John went to the Wimmera as land became available but returned to the Western District. He married in 1899 to Emma Payne and they settled at Mount Eccles near Macarthur. In 1917. the family moved to  Hamilton and John and Emma were given a send-off at Macarthur’s Methodist church in July 1917. In his younger years, John excelled at football, cricket, boxing and rope quoits.  His obituary stated John, “by his sterling manliness. won hosts of friends, by whom he was highly respected.”  John and Emma had five daughters and one son and each of the girls became teachers.  John was buried at the Old Hamilton Cemetery and forty-five cars followed the hearse to the cemetery.

Janet Scott MacDONALD – Died December 1934 at Peterborough.  Janet was born around 1844 near Mount Buninyong. Her parents had arrived three years earlier from Perth, Scotland.  She married Charles MacGilivray in 1869.  In 1873, they moved to  Peterborough settling “in the wilderness on the banks of Curdie’s Inlet”,

CURDIE'S RIVER. PETERBOROUGH. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64687

CURDIE’S RIVER. PETERBOROUGH. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64687

In the early days, Janet welcomed pioneering clergymen into her home and Charles MacGilivray was behind the construction of the first church at Peterborough. Janet was often turned to when a history of the town was sought.  She could tell of the times she was lonely when barely anyone else lived around or the tales of the many shipwrecks along the coast near Peterborough.  Janet’s six sisters all lived into their eighties and two were living at the time of her death.

Thomas O’HALLORAN – Died 24 December 1934 at Hamilton.  Thomas was born at Allansford around 1868. His first job was with James Farrar, a Warrnambool coachbuilder. He then went to Macarthur operating  a coachbuilding and undertaking business.  In 1893,  Thomas married local girl Mary Ann Lucas a daughter of John Lucas (listed above). Around 1915, Thomas and Mary Ann moved to Hamilton and Thomas opened Thomas O’Halloran & Son undertakers in Lonsdale Street.

"Advertising" Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918) 3 March 1917: 8. .

“Advertising” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 – 1918) 3 March 1917: 8. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129397006&gt;.

Mary Ann died in 1929 and since Thomas’ health was not good, he retired soon after. Thomas was considered  one of the best cabinetmakers in the state.  His craftsmanship is still on display today in St Mary’s Catholic Church Hamilton, with Thomas having made the tabernacle and canopy over the altar and the confessional. He also made the St. Mary’s Church WW1 Roll of Honour. It was in the same church a Requiem Mass was held for Thomas on Boxing Day after he died on Christmas Eve from a lengthy illness.

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63044

INTERIOR ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH HAMILTON. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63044

William Charles PEVITT – Died 25 December 1938 at Heywood. William was born around 1857, a son of Henry and Harriet Pevitt.  He married Alice Hannah Scantlebury at Sandford in 1880 and they had four children.  Alice died in 1893 at Heywood aged thirty-one.  After Alice’s death, William lived with family at Merino and then Homerton. In 1907, William married Mary Ann Brown at Warrnambool. William returned to Heywood and lived there until his death.  Mary Ann died around 1935.

George Edwin CHARMAN – Died 21 December 1942 at Coleraine.  George Charman was born in  1852 at Moorabbin.  He married Elizabeth Hollis at Portland in 1877. They spent the first nine years or so of their marriage at Portland before moving to Coleraine where they remained and had eleven children.  A sad time came in 1897 when their third daughter Mary Ann died suddenly aged fourteen.

"OBITUARY" Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 4 January 1943: 4 (EVENING). .

“OBITUARY” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 4 January 1943: 4 (EVENING). <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64383343&gt;.

In 1922, Elizabeth died and in time George moved in with his daughter Edith, wife of Ben Rigby.  It was there George died in 1942.  He was buried at the Coleraine Cemetery.

James WILSON – Died 25 December 1944 at Portland.  James Wilson’s parents were earlier settlers at The Lagoons, Bridgewater where he was born in 1863.  In 1886, he married Priscilla Hollard.  James ran a hairdresser and tobacconist shop in Portland and did some work for Messrs Learmonth & Co auctioneers in Portland.

"Mr. James Wilson's New Building." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 14 November 1894: .

“Mr. James Wilson’s New Building.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 14 November 1894: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65397334&gt;.

He spent time in Melbourne running a business and living at 346 Burwood Road Hawthorn in 1918 before moving back to Portland in 1937.  James was closely associated with the Methodist Church and Sons of Temperance.  Priscilla died in January 1943 at Portland.  James and Priscilla had no children.

William Henry ANDERSON – Died 23 December 1950 at Ballarat. William Anderson was born around 1861 at Linton and married Edith Gardiner of Smythesdale.  The couple moved to the Otways, early pioneers of the district.  William ran dairy farms at Princetown and Carlise River.  They remained in the district until 1914 when William and Edith moved to Wangoom, near Warrnambool but remained in dairy farming.  After WW1, William’s returned servicemen sons took up soldier settlement blocks at Chocolyn and William and Edith moved there until 1930. They then moved to Ferguson Street, Camperdown. William was a member of the Oddfellows and enjoyed following football and cricket.  He was buried at the Camperdown Cemetery.  Edith died in November 1951 at Camperdown.